Mr K Beginning Journalism

20 Questions | Total Attempts: 125

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Journalism Quizzes & Trivia

This quiz will cover two areas of Beginning Journalism: The Inverted Pyramid and Writing Leads. Prepare yourself for a bit of fun!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A good type of article to use the Inverted Pyramid would be
    • A. 

      A personality feature about a movie star

    • B. 

      A hard news article about a significant event

    • C. 

      A classified ad

    • D. 

      The horoscopes

  • 2. 
    When writing an article using the Inverted Pyramid style,
    • A. 

      A quote should go first

    • B. 

      Fine details should go first

    • C. 

      The "who" should go first

    • D. 

      The most important information goes first

  • 3. 
    When writing in the Inverted Pyramid style,
    • A. 

      Your details should build to a climax and resolution

    • B. 

      Leave out all the details

    • C. 

      The details should become less and less important

    • D. 

      Always wear a fedora

  • 4. 
    A reason to write in the Inverted Pyramid style is because
    • A. 

      That shape is cool

    • B. 

      Your editor might cut off the last part of your article

    • C. 

      Not all readers will finish the article but they still want all the information

    • D. 

      Both b and c

  • 5. 
    When writing a news article
    • A. 

      You should include the "who" and the "what"

    • B. 

      You should include the "when" and the "where"

    • C. 

      You should include the "why" and the "how"

    • D. 

      All of the above, in fact, you should include all the W's and H as soon as possible

  • 6. 
    In journalism, a "lead" is
    • A. 

      The very last thing you write in an article.

    • B. 

      The same as the headline.

    • C. 

      The first paragraph of a story.

    • D. 

      Really cute.

  • 7. 
    The purpose of writing a good lead is to
    • A. 

      Give readers the most important information in a clear, concise and interesting manner.

    • B. 

      Establishe the voice and direction of an article.

    • C. 

      Grab the reader's interest.

    • D. 

      All of the above.

  • 8. 
    A "Summary Lead"
    • A. 

      Summarizes your article.

    • B. 

      Always is phrased in the form of a question.

    • C. 

      Inludes several of the "Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How.

    • D. 

      Both a and c

  • 9. 
    A strong lead should contain approximately how many words?
    • A. 

      10

    • B. 

      20

    • C. 

      30

    • D. 

      40+

  • 10. 
    Check the boxes that are lead alternatives to the summary lead. (which one of these leads are real?)
    • A. 

      Analogy lead

    • B. 

      Wordplay lead

    • C. 

      Heavy lead

    • D. 

      Startling statement lead

    • E. 

      Quote lead

    • F. 

      Leader lead

  • 11. 
    What type of lead is this? Twenty-eight passengers and a crew of four were killed last night when a single-engine plane crashed four miles south of Bloomington.
  • 12. 
    What type of lead is this? "I don't want to sound anti-American," poet Derek Walcott told his audience at Illinois Wesleyan University, "but this country is the only nation that taxes the Nobel Prize."
    • A. 

      Summary lead

    • B. 

      Quotation lead

    • C. 

      Boring lead

    • D. 

      Startling statement lead

  • 13. 
    Why isn't it a good idea to start your lead with the "where" or "when?"
    • A. 

      Because they are never inluded in a lead.

    • B. 

      Rarely are place and time the most important aspects of the story.

    • C. 

      Because it's in poor taste.

    • D. 

      Because this is rule number one in lead writing.

  • 14. 
    Does this lead start with the who, what, when, where, or why? Reckless drivers who don't seem to be drunk may well be high on cocaine or marijuana, according to roadside tests that indicate drugs may rival alcohol as a hazard on the highway.
  • 15. 
    Does this lead start with the who, what, when, where, or why? Jars and cans tumbled off store shelves and telephone poles swayed when an earthquake that was a "real good shaker" rumbled through Central California yesterday.
  • 16. 
    Does this lead start with the who, what, when, where, or why? With more amateurs cutting wood for use as an alternative to high-priced heating oil, hospitals are coping with an increasing number of injuries due to chain-saw accidents, reported the American College of Surgeons.
  • 17. 
    A summary lead should answer two or more of the 5 W's and H.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 18. 
    In deciding how to start a lead, ask yourself "What is the first thing you would tell someone else about a situation or event?
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 19. 
    What is wrong with this lead:  Last Friday, March 18, all of the sophomore, junior and senior students assembled in the gymnasium. After Student Body President Gary Winchman led the students in the flag salute, Vice Principal Barry Jones presented Sen. Robert Brown, who talked about ecology.
    • A. 

      Nothing, this lead is quite nice.

    • B. 

      This is filled to the brim with details that don't belong in a lead.

    • C. 

      It is dull.

    • D. 

      It is too long and needs severe copy editing.

    • E. 

      B, C, and D

  • 20. 
    Your job as a journalist is to write a clear, fairly short sentence for a lead that reveals all, telling the end result of the story. Someone should be able to read the lead and be informed about what happened without reading the rest of the story.
    • A. 

      Exactly.

    • B. 

      Huh?

    • C. 

      This is not true.

    • D. 

      I'm sort of hungry for pork rinds.

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