Language And Writing Quiz - Learn The Science Behind Writing

43 Questions

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Language And Writing Quiz - Learn The Science Behind Writing

Literature and writing broadly is any collection of written work, but it is also used more specifically for writings narrowly considered to be an art form. We humans have been using literature for thousands of years now to transfer stories and knowledge through time. The art of writing has become more and more technical with time. Take this Quiz about the Science behind writing!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Text is
    • A. 

      A system of language means which serves a definite aim of communication

    • B. 

      Any verbalized communicative event performed via human language in oral mode

    • C. 

      Any verbalized communicative event performed via human language in written or in oral mode

    • D. 

      A complex communicative phenomenon, which includes different factors of interaction

  • 2. 
    Discourse is:
    • A. 

      A complex communicative phenomenon, which includes the text and other factors of interaction.

    • B. 

      Embedded into text

    • C. 

      Any verbalized communicative event performed via human language in written or in oral mode

    • D. 

      A complex communicative phenomenon, which includes comunicative goals and cognitive systems of participants

  • 3. 
    Cohesion is:
    • A. 

      A measure of the extent to which the reader or listener finds that the text makes sense as a unity

    • B. 

      The way certain words can connect a sentence to its predecessors and successors in a text.

    • C. 

      A subjective category assigned to text by a reader or listener.

    • D. 

      Is based on semantic relationships.

  • 4. 
    Coherence is:
    • A. 

      The way certain words can connect a sentence to its predecessors and successors.

    • B. 

      A feature which helps to understand a text as a whole and to comprehend its topic.

    • C. 

      A measure of the extent to which the reader or listener finds that the text makes sense as a unity.

    • D. 

      Determined by lexically and grammatically overt intersentential relationships.

  • 5. 
    Artefact texts:
    • A. 

      Describe the fictional world, created in the imagination of the author.

    • B. 

      Deal with the facts of the real world but have certain linguistic features of fictional texts.

    • C. 

      Perform artistic function.

    • D. 

      Are used either for "changing" the real world or for reporting statements about it.

  • 6. 
    "Grey zone" texts:
    • A. 

      Deal with the facts of the real world but have certain linguistic features of fictional texts.

    • B. 

      Are used either for "changing" the real world or for reporting statements about it.

    • C. 

      Describe the fictional world, created in the imagination of the author.

    • D. 

      Perform communicative function.

  • 7. 
    Functional style is:
    • A. 

      A system of language means which serves a definite aim of communication.

    • B. 

      Any verbalized communicative event performed via human language in written or in oral mode.

    • C. 

      A complex communicative phenomenon, which includes the text and other factors of interaction.

    • D. 

      A main unit of interaction.

  • 8. 
    Cohesion can be:
    • A. 

      Lexical and semantic.

    • B. 

      Phonetic, grammatical, lexical and stylistic.

    • C. 

      Grammatical, lexical and semantic.

    • D. 

      Grammatical and stylistic.

  • 9. 
    Sub-styles of the language of official documents are:
    • A. 

      The language of humanitarian and "exact" sciences, of popular scientific prose.

    • B. 

      The language of legal, business and military documents.

    • C. 

      The language of poetry, drama and emotive prose.

    • D. 

      The language of mass-media, of political and other public speeches and of informational technologies.

  • 10. 
    Texts of official documents are characterised by:
    • A. 

      Conventionality of expression, set expressions, complicated syntax, the encoded character of language.

    • B. 

      Use of "tag questions" and "hedges", speaking "in italics", super-polite forms of expression.

    • C. 

      Set expressions, complicated syntax, conventionality of expression, restricted use of SDs and Ems.

    • D. 

      Asyndetic attributive word-groups, passive constructions, terms, impersonality of expression.

  • 11. 
    Scientific and technical texts are characterised by:
    • A. 

      Conventionality of expression, set expressions, complicated syntax, the encoded character of language.

    • B. 

      Absence of any SDs and EMs, asyndetic attributive word-groups, terms, passive constructions.

    • C. 

      Asyndetic attributive word-groups, passive constructions, terms, impersonality of expression.

    • D. 

      Use of "tag questions" and "hedges", speaking "in italics", super-polite forms of expression. 

  • 12. 
    Sub-styles of the publicistic style are:
    • A. 

      The language of mass-media, of political and other public speeches and of informational technologies.

    • B. 

      The language of poetry, drama and emotive prose.

    • C. 

      The language of humanitarian and "exact" sciences, of popular scientific prose.

    • D. 

      The language of legal, business and military documents.

  • 13. 
    Special literary vocabulary includes:
    • A. 

      Slang, jargon, professional words, dialectal, obscene and vulgar words.

    • B. 

      Metaphor, metonymy, zeugma, oxymoron, pun, irony, simile, epithet.

    • C. 

      Terms, poetic and highly literary words, obsolete words, barbarisms, neologisms, acronyms.

    • D. 

      Obsolete words, neologisms, poetic and highly literary words, jargon, vulgar words.

  • 14. 
    Special colloquial vocabulary includes:
    • A. 

      Metaphor, metonymy, zeugma, oxymoron, pun, irony, simile, epithet.

    • B. 

      Slang, jargon, professional words, dialectal, obscene and vulgar words.

    • C. 

      Obscene and vulgar words, slang, terms, barbarisms, acronyms.

    • D. 

      Terms, poetic and highly literary words, obsolete words, barbarisms, neologisms, acronyms.

  • 15. 
    Expressive means are:
    • A. 

      Intentional intensifications of some typical structural or semantic properties of language units.

    • B. 

      A mechanism of using a word or phrase in a figurative or idiomatic meaning.

    • C. 

      A certain kind of language used in a certain social situation.

    • D. 

      Phonetic, morphological, lexical, idiomatic and syntactical forms used for emotional intensification.

  • 16. 
    Stylistic devices are:
    • A. 

      Intentional intensifications of some typical structural or semantic properties of language units.

    • B. 

      A mechanism of using a word or phrase in a figurative or idiomatic meaning.

    • C. 

      Phonetic, morphological, lexical, idiomatic and syntactical forms used for emotional intensification.

    • D. 

      A certain kind of language used in a certain social situation.

  • 17. 
    Zeugma is:
    • A. 

      Controversial comparisons.

    • B. 

      Irony.

    • C. 

      Similar syntactic but different semantic relationships between words.

    • D. 

      Colourful attribute.

  • 18. 
    Metaphor is:
    • A. 

      Specific relationship between the dictionary and contextual meanings of a lexical unit.

    • B. 

      Simultaneous implementation of two meanings of a lexical unit.

    • C. 

      Similar syntactic but different semantic relationships between words.

    • D. 

      Comparison.

  • 19. 
    Oxymoron is:
    • A. 

      Controversial comparisons.

    • B. 

      The play of words.

    • C. 

      Colourful attribute.

    • D. 

      Comparison.

  • 20. 
    Communicative aim of texts of belles-lettres style is:
    • A. 

      To make the reader believe the author and thus indirectly influence their behaviour.

    • B. 

      To inform the addressee about events in the real world.

    • C. 

      To persuade the addressee that the author’s point of view is the only correct one.

    • D. 

      To bind the addressee to a certain kind of behaviour.

  • 21. 
    Pragmatics is:
    • A. 

      Relationships between language signs.

    • B. 

      Relationships between the sign, its meaning and its referent.

    • C. 

      Relationships between signs and their users.

    • D. 

      Relationships between the users.

  • 22. 
    The pragmatic component of the text includes:
    • A. 

      The pragmatic component of the text and its compressed proposition.

    • B. 

      Singular author, collective addressee, illocutionary verb.

    • C. 

      Collective author, singular addressee, illocutionary verb.

    • D. 

      Singular or collective author, singular or collective addressee, illocutionary verb.

  • 23. 
    CMP is composed of:
    • A. 

      Singular or collective author, singular or collective addressee, illocutionary verb.

    • B. 

      Deictic markers, noun phrase, verb phrase, illocutionary verb.

    • C. 

      The pragmatic component of the text and deictic axes.

    • D. 

      The pragmatic component of the text and its compressed proposition.

  • 24. 
    If a language favors a certain gender over another, it is:
    • A. 

      Bias-free

    • B. 

      Gender-biased

    • C. 

      Bias-gendered

    • D. 

      Neutral

  • 25. 
    Linguistic features of the "female" languages are:
    • A. 

      Use of "tag questions" and "hedges", speaking "in italics", super-polite forms of expression.

    • B. 

      Special vocabulary, use of "tag questions" and "hedges", absence of direct quotations.

    • C. 

      Use of "empty" adjectives or adverbs, super-polite forms of expression, sense of humour.

    • D. 

      Use of "tag questions" and "hedges", speaking "in italics", correct grammar and pronunciation.

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