Ap37 P4 Frankenstein

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Frankenstein Quizzes & Trivia

Frankenstein, Pre-AP/AP Practice #4
Chapter X, Multiple-choice questions


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

             “Devil,” I exclaimed,” do you dare approach me? and do not you fear the fierce vengeance of my arm wreaked on your miserable head? Begone, vile insect! or rather, stay, that I may trample you to dust! and, oh! that I could, with the extinction of your miserable existence, restore those victims whom you have so diabolically(5)murdered!”         “I expected this reception,” said the daemon. “All men hate the wretched; how, then, must I be hated, who am miserable beyond all living things! Yet you, my creator, detest and spurn me, thy creature, to whom thou art bound by ties only dissoluble by the annihilation of one of us. You purpose to kill me. How dare you(10)sport thus with life? Do your duty towards me, and I will do mine towards you and the rest of mankind.  If you will comply with my conditions, I will leave them and you at peace; but if you refuse, I will glut the maw of death, until it be satiated with the blood of your remaining friends.”         “Abhorred monster! fiend that thou art! the tortures of hell are too mild a(15)vengeance for thy crimes. Wretched devil!  you reproach me with your creation; come on, then, that I may extinguish the spark which I so negligently bestowed.”         My rage was without bounds; I sprang on him, impelled by all the feelings which can arm one being against the existence of another.         He easily eluded me, and said–(20)        “Be calm! I entreat you to hear me, before you give vent to your hatred on my devoted head. Have I not suffered enough that you seek to increase my misery? Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it. Remember, thou hast made me more powerful than thyself; my height is superior to thine; my joints more supple.  But I will not be tempted to set myself in(25)opposition to thee. I am thy creature, and I will be even mild and docile to my natural lord and king, if thou wilt also perform thy part, the which thou owest me. Oh, Frankenstein, be not equitable to every other, and trample upon me alone, to whom thy justice, and even thy clemency and affection, is most due. Remember, that I am thy creature; I ought to be thy Adam; but I am rather the fallen angel,(30)whom thou drivest from joy for no misdeed. Everywhere I see bliss, from which I alone am irrevocably excluded. I was benevolent and good; misery made me fiend. Make me happy, and I shall again be virtuous.”         “Begone! I will not hear you. There can be no community between you and me; we are enemies. Begone, or let us try our strength in a fight, in which one must(35)fall.”         “How can I move thee? Will no entreaties cause thee to turn a favourable eye upon thy creature, who implores thy goodness and compassion?  Believe me, Frankenstein: I was benevolent; my soul glowed with love and humanity: but am I not alone, miserably alone? You, my creator, abhor me; what hope can I gather(40)from your fellow-creatures, who owe me nothing? they spurn and hate me. The desert mountains and dreary glaciers are my refuge. I have wandered here many days; the caves of ice, which I only do not fear, are a dwelling to me, and the only one which man does not grudge. These bleak skies I hail, for they are kinder to me than your fellow-beings. If the multitude of mankind knew of my existence, they(45)would do as you do, and arm themselves for my destruction. Shall I not then hate them who abhor me? I will keep no terms with my enemies. I am miserable, and they shall share my wretchedness. Yet it is in your power to recompense me, and deliver them from an evil which it only remains for you to make so great that not only you and your family, but thousands of others, shall be swallowed up in the(50)whirlwinds of its rage.  Let your compassion be moved, and do not disdain me.  Listen to my tale: when you have heard that, abandon or commiserate me, as you shall judge that I deserve.  But hear me. The guilty are allowed, by human laws, bloody as they are, to speak in their own defence before they are condemned. Listen to me, Frankenstein. You accuse me of murder; and yet you would, with a satisfied(55)conscience, destroy your own creature. Oh, praise the eternal justice of man! Yet I ask you not to spare me:  listen to me; and then, if you can, and if you will, destroy the work of your hands.”         “Why do you call to my remembrance,” I rejoined, “circumstances, of which I shudder to reflect, that I have been the miserable origin and author?  Cursed be the(60)day, abhorred devil, in which you first saw light!  Cursed (although I curse myself) be the hands that formed you! You have made me wretched beyond expression. You have left me no power to consider whether I am just to you or not. Begone!  relieve me from the sight of your detested form.”         “Thus I relieve thee, my creator,” he said, and placed his hated hands before my(65)eyes, which I flung from me with violence; “thus I take from thee a sight which you abhor. Still thou canst listen to me, and grant me thy compassion. By the virtues that I once possessed, I demand this from you.  Hear my tale; it is long and strange, and the temperature of this place is not fitting to your fine sensations; come to the hut upon the mountain. The sun is yet high in the heavens; before it descends to hide(70)itself behind yon snowy precipices, and illuminate another world, you will have heard my story, and can decide.  On you it rests whether I quit for ever the neighbourhood of man, and lead a harmless life, or become the scourge of your fellow-creatures, and the author of your own speedy ruin.”         As he said this, he led the way across the ice: I followed. My heart was full, and(75)I did not answer him; but, as I proceeded, I weighed the various arguments that he had used, and determined at least to listen to his tale. I was partly urged by curiosity, and compassion confirmed my resolution. I had hitherto supposed him to be the murderer of my brother, and I eagerly sought a confirmation or denial of this opinion. For the first time, also, I felt what the duties of a creator towards his(80)creature were, and that I ought to render him happy before I complained of his wickedness. These motives urged me to comply with his demand. We crossed the ice, therefore, and ascended the opposite rock.  The air was cold, and the rain again began to descend: we entered the hut, the fiend with an air of exultation, I with a heavy heart and depressed spirits. But I consented to listen; and, seating myself by(85)the fire which my odious companion had lighted, he thus began his tale.

  • 2. 

    [Choose the most complete answer.] The daemon’s question, “‘How dare you sport thus with life?’” (lines 9-10)

    • A.

      Implies that Frankenstein lacks reverence for life

    • B.

      Is ironic given what the daemon has done

    • C.

      Implies that Frankenstein lacks reverence for life and is ironic given what the daemon has done

    • D.

      Is ironic given what the daemon has done and is ironic given what the daemon threatens to do

    • E.

      Implies that Frankenstein lacks reverence for life, is ironic given what the daemon has done, and is ironic given what the daemon threatens to do

    Correct Answer
    E. Implies that Frankenstein lacks reverence for life, is ironic given what the daemon has done, and is ironic given what the daemon threatens to do
    Explanation
    implies that Frankenstein lacks reverence for life, is ironic given what the daemon has done, and is ironic given what the daemon threatens to do. “Sport with” means to toy or play with, which implies a lack of reverence. Given that the daemon has killed and threatens to kill again unless he gets what he wants, his question about daring to “sport thus with life” is ironic.

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  • 3. 

    Lines 14-16 contain all of the following literary devices EXCEPT

    • A.

      Alliteration

    • B.

      Polysyndeton

    • C.

      Allusion

    • D.

      Imperative

    • E.

      Symbolism

    Correct Answer
    B. Polysyndeton
    Explanation
    polysyndeton. There is no polysyndeton in these lines. There are examples of alliteration (“that thou, “creation, come,” “then, that”), allusion (hell, devil, creation), and symbol (the “spark” representing life).

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  • 4. 

    The daemon utters the sentence in lines 23-24 as a(n)

    • A.

      Mock

    • B.

      Taunt

    • C.

      Insult

    • D.

      Warning

    • E.

      Boast

    Correct Answer
    D. Warning
    Explanation
    warning. The preceding sentence states the creature’s determination to fight in defense of his life, so the litany of superior physical traits is a definite warning that any attempt by Frankenstein to kill him will be unsuccessful.

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  • 5. 

    In lines 20-32, the daemon, in an attempt to persuade Frankenstein to grant his wish, uses all of the following techniques EXCEPT

    • A.

      Emotional appeal

    • B.

      Ethical appeal

    • C.

      Understatement

    • D.

      Flattery

    • E.

      Allusions

    Correct Answer
    C. Understatement
    Explanation
    understatement. There is no understatement in these lines. The daemon appeals to Frankenstein’s emotions when he says “entreat,” “suffered enough,” “my misery,” and “make me happy.” He uses ethical appeal when he says “perform the part, the which thou owest me” and “justice, clemency.” The daemon flatters Frankenstein when he says “my natural lord and king” and “equitable to every other.” Allusions are made to “Adam” and “fallen angel.”

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  • 6. 

    The tone of the exclamation in line 55 could best be described as

    • A.

      Admiring

    • B.

      Serious

    • C.

      Sarcastic

    • D.

      Humble

    • E.

      Respectful

    Correct Answer
    C. Sarcastic
    Explanation
    sarcastic. Sarcasm is evident in that the preceding sentence points out the injustice of Frankenstein wanting to kill the creature and not thinking it would be murder. It also follows the reference to “bloody justice.”

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  • 7. 

    The daemon places blame for his misdeeds on all of the following EXCEPT

    • A.

      His own lack of understanding of the ways of the world

    • B.

      Frankenstein for creating and then abandoning him

    • C.

      His loneliness and unhappiness

    • D.

      People’s reaction to his monstrous appearance

    • E.

      Circumstances over which he had no control

    Correct Answer
    A. His own lack of understanding of the ways of the world
    Explanation
    his own lack of understanding of the ways of the world. The creature does not blame his lack of understanding; in fact, he understands quite well the ways of the world (lines 7-8 and 28-30). He blames his loneliness and unhappiness in lines 30-32, 37-38, and 46-47. He blames people’s reactions to his ugliness in lines 64-66, 40, and 46. He constantly refers to his fate being a result of his appearance, which causes people to abhor him, and over which he has no control since Frankenstein made him that way.

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  • 8. 

    [Choose the most complete answer.] Frankenstein’s response to the daemon reveals Frankenstein’s sense of

    • A.

      Guilt

    • B.

      Responsibility

    • C.

      Guilt and compassion

    • D.

      Compassion and responsibility

    • E.

      Guilt, compassion, and responsibility

    Correct Answer
    E. Guilt, compassion, and responsibility
    Explanation
    guilt and compassion and responsibility. “My heart was full” and “compassion confirmed” reveal Frankenstein’s sympathy. His guilt is evident in lines 58-60, and his sense of responsibility is shown in lines 79-80, “the duties of a creator toward his creature . . . .”

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  • Current Version
  • Mar 21, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Aug 23, 2016
    Quiz Created by
    Fort_Bend
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