AP Lit Terms Quiz

57 Questions | Total Attempts: 9748

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When students study Literature, they learn to appreciate words and their power. They travel to other realms and times through the texts they read and get to understand about their own culture and others. Below is a multiple-choice quiz on literary terms found on the AP Literature and Composition exam. Give it a try and get to refresh your memory!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    repetition of the same or similar consonant sounds at the beginning of words.
    • A. 

      Assonance

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Metaphor

  • 2. 
    Art of effective communication, especially persuasive discourse.
    • A. 

      Rhetoric

    • B. 

      Allusion

    • C. 

      Style

    • D. 

      Mood

  • 3. 
    a “play on words” based on the multiple meanings of a single word or on words that sound alike but mean different things.
    • A. 

      Metonymy

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

    • D. 

      Pun

  • 4. 
    a statement that appears self-contradictory, but that reveals a kind of truth.
    • A. 

      Paradox

    • B. 

      Irony

    • C. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • D. 

      Simile

  • 5. 
    a work that makes fun of another work by imitating some aspect of the writer’s style.
    • A. 

      Satire

    • B. 

      Farce

    • C. 

      Parody

    • D. 

      Fable

  • 6. 
    poetic and rhetorical device in which normally unassociated ideas, words, or phrases are placed next to one another, creating an effect of surprise and wit.
    • A. 

      Parallel structure

    • B. 

      Rhetorical question

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Juxtaposition

  • 7. 
    a figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things without the use of such specific words of comparison as like, as, than, or resembles.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Juxtaposition

  • 8. 
    the author reveals to the reader what the character is like by describing how the character looks and dresses, by letting the reader hear what the character says, by revealing the character’s private thoughts and feelings, by revealing the characters effect on other people (showing how other characters feel or behave toward the character), or by showing the character in action. Common in modern literature
    • A. 

      Irony

    • B. 

      Dramatic irony

    • C. 

      Indirect characterization

    • D. 

      Direct characterization

  • 9. 
    in general, a story that ends with a happy resolution of the conflicts faced by the main character or characters.
    • A. 

      Tragedy

    • B. 

      Farce

    • C. 

      Comedy

    • D. 

      Satire

  • 10. 
    a speaker or writer’s choice of words.
    • A. 

      Diction

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Mood

    • D. 

      Style

  • 11. 
    A character who acts as contrast to another character. Often a funny side kick to the dashing hero, or a villain contrasting the hero.
    • A. 

      Antihero

    • B. 

      Protagonist

    • C. 

      Antagonist

    • D. 

      Foil

  • 12. 
    a figure of speech that uses an incredible exaggeration or overstatement, for effect. “If I told you once, I’ve told you a million times….”
    • A. 

      Understatement

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Satire

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

  • 13. 
    a figure of speech in which a person, place, or thing, is referred to by something closely associated with it. “We requested from the crown support for our petition.” The crown is used to represent the monarch.
    • A. 

      Oxymoron

    • B. 

      Metonymy

    • C. 

      Metaphor

    • D. 

      Simile

  • 14. 
    An atmosphere created by a writer’s diction and the details selected.
    • A. 

      Tone

    • B. 

      Setting

    • C. 

      Mood

    • D. 

      Style

  • 15. 
    one of the characters tells the story.
    • A. 

      Third person point of view

    • B. 

      First pierson point of view

    • C. 

      Omniscient point of view

    • D. 

      Objective point of view

  • 16. 
    an unknown narrator, tells the story, but this narrator zooms in to focus on the thoughts and feelings of only one character.
    • A. 

      Third person point of view

    • B. 

      First person point of view

    • C. 

      Omniscient point of view

    • D. 

      Objective point of view

  • 17. 
    an all knowing narrator tells the story, also using the third person pronouns. This narrator, instead of focusing on one character only, often tells us everything about many characters.
    • A. 

      Third person point of view

    • B. 

      First person point of view

    • C. 

      Omniscient point of view

    • D. 

      Objective point of view

  • 18. 
    a narrator who is totally impersonal and objective tells the story, with no comment on any characters or events.
    • A. 

      Third person point of view

    • B. 

      First person point of view

    • C. 

      Omniscient point of view

    • D. 

      Objective point of view

  • 19. 
    a figure of speech in which an object or animal is given human feelings, thoughts, or attitudes.
    • A. 

      Personification

    • B. 

      Metonymy

    • C. 

      Polysyndeton

    • D. 

      Metaphor

  • 20. 
    a poem consisting of four lines, or four lines of a poem that can be considered as a unit.
    • A. 

      Couplet

    • B. 

      Quatrain

    • C. 

      Lyric poem

    • D. 

      Confessional poetry

  • 21. 
    a person, place, thing, or event that has meaning in itself and that also stands for something more than itself.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Theme

    • C. 

      Symbol

    • D. 

      Metonymy

  • 22. 
    the attitude a writer takes toward the subject of a work, the characters in it, or the audience, revealed through diction, figurative language, and organization.
    • A. 

      Mood

    • B. 

      Style

    • C. 

      Tone

    • D. 

      Setting

  • 23. 
    the insight about human life that is revealed in a literary work.
    • A. 

      Motif

    • B. 

      Theme

    • C. 

      Justaposition

    • D. 

      Diction

  • 24. 
    story or poem in which characters, settings, and events stand for other people or events or for abstract ideas or qualities.
    • A. 

      Parable

    • B. 

      Satire

    • C. 

      Allegory

    • D. 

      Farce

  • 25. 
    Opponent who struggles against or blocks the hero in a story.
    • A. 

      Antagonist

    • B. 

      Protagonist

    • C. 

      Epithet

    • D. 

      Foil