50 Question Anatomy 214 Cranial Nerves Test

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Mackmr
M
Mackmr
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 1,610
Questions: 48 | Attempts: 1,610

SettingsSettingsSettings
Cranial Nerve Quizzes & Trivia

WAIT: when I ask you to name a cranial nerve, just write the name, do not write 'nerve' after or you'll get it wrong!
Covers structural relationships of cranial nerves for the 2012 systemic human anatomy class at McGill University.
Created by Mack Michell-Robinson in 2012 for McGill University, Dept. Of Anatomy and Cell Biology


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Cranial Nerve 1 is called ______.

    Explanation
    Cranial Nerve 1 is called the Olfactory nerve. This nerve is responsible for our sense of smell and carries sensory information from the nose to the brain. The term "olfactory" is derived from the Latin word "olfactus," which means "to smell." Therefore, the correct answer for this question is Olfactory.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    Cranial Nerve 2 is called ______.

    Explanation
    Cranial Nerve 2 is called the Optic nerve. This nerve is responsible for transmitting visual information from the retina to the brain. It plays a crucial role in vision, allowing us to perceive and interpret visual stimuli.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    Cranial Nerve 3 is called ______.

    Explanation
    Cranial Nerve 3 is called the Oculomotor nerve. This nerve is responsible for controlling the movement of the eye muscles, including the muscles that control eye movement in all directions except for up and down. It also controls the constriction of the pupil and the accommodation of the lens for near vision. The term "oculomotor" is derived from the Latin words "oculus" meaning "eye" and "motor" meaning "movement," indicating its role in eye movement control.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    Cranial Nerve 4 is called ______.

    Explanation
    Cranial Nerve 4 is called the Trochlear nerve. The trochlear nerve is responsible for controlling the superior oblique muscle of the eye, which helps with downward and inward eye movement. It is the smallest cranial nerve and is unique because it is the only nerve that emerges from the posterior side of the brainstem.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    Cranial Nerve 5 is called ______.

    Explanation
    Cranial Nerve 5 is called the Trigeminal nerve. The trigeminal nerve is responsible for providing sensory information from the face, as well as controlling the muscles involved in chewing. It is named trigeminal because it has three branches: the ophthalmic branch, the maxillary branch, and the mandibular branch. These branches innervate different areas of the face and are responsible for transmitting sensory information to the brain.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    Cranial Nerve 6 is called ______.

    Explanation
    Cranial Nerve 6 is called Abducens. The term "abducens" refers to the ability of this nerve to control the movement of the eye outward, away from the midline of the body. It is responsible for the lateral movement of the eye, allowing it to look towards the side. This nerve originates in the brainstem and innervates the lateral rectus muscle of the eye. Dysfunction of the Abducens nerve can lead to a condition called abducens nerve palsy, which can result in the inability to move the affected eye laterally.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    Cranial Nerve 7 is called ______.

    Explanation
    The correct answer is Facial. Cranial Nerve 7 is called the Facial nerve. This nerve is responsible for controlling the muscles of facial expression, as well as transmitting taste sensations from the front two-thirds of the tongue. It also controls the production of tears and saliva. Dysfunction of the Facial nerve can lead to facial weakness or paralysis, loss of taste, and difficulty in closing the eye or controlling facial movements.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    Cranial Nerve 9 is called ______.

    Explanation
    Cranial Nerve 9 is called Glossopharyngeal. This nerve is responsible for controlling various functions in the head and neck, including swallowing, taste sensation from the back of the tongue, and monitoring blood pressure. It also plays a role in the gag reflex and helps to regulate salivation. The name "Glossopharyngeal" is derived from the Greek words "glossa" meaning tongue and "pharynx" meaning throat, indicating its involvement in these areas.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    Cranial Nerve 8 is called ______.

    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Vestibulocochlear". Cranial Nerve 8 is also known as the Vestibulocochlear nerve, which is responsible for transmitting sound and balance information from the inner ear to the brain. The term "auditory" is correct as well, as it refers to the nerve's role in hearing. However, "auditory vestibular" is not a commonly used term to describe Cranial Nerve 8, making it an incorrect option.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    Cranial Nerve 10 is called ______.

    Explanation
    Cranial Nerve 10 is called the Vagus nerve. The vagus nerve is the longest cranial nerve and is responsible for various functions in the body, including regulating the heart rate, controlling digestion, and influencing speech and swallowing. It is an essential part of the parasympathetic nervous system, which helps to balance the body's functions and promote relaxation.

    Rate this question:

  • 11. 

    Cranial Nerve 11 is called ______.

    Explanation
    Cranial Nerve 11 is called the Spinal Accessory. This nerve is responsible for controlling the movement of certain muscles in the head and neck, including the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles. It is called the Spinal Accessory because it originates from the spinal cord and travels up to the brainstem, where it joins with other cranial nerves.

    Rate this question:

  • 12. 

    Cranial Nerve 12 is called ______.

    Explanation
    Cranial Nerve 12 is referred to as the hypoglossal nerve. This nerve is responsible for controlling the movement of the tongue, including its muscles and coordination. It plays a crucial role in speech, swallowing, and other functions related to the tongue's movement and position.

    Rate this question:

  • 13. 

    CN2 has what type of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Sensory

    • B.

      Motor

    • C.

      Sympathetic

    • D.

      Parasympathetic

    • E.

      Special Sensory

    Correct Answer
    E. Special Sensory
    Explanation
    CN2, also known as the optic nerve, is responsible for transmitting visual information from the retina to the brain. It is composed of sensory fibers that carry visual signals. Therefore, the correct answer is "Sensory" as it accurately describes the type of fibers found in CN2.

    Rate this question:

  • 14. 

    CN1 has what type of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Sensory

    • B.

      Motor

    • C.

      Sympathetic

    • D.

      Parasympathetic

    • E.

      Special Sensory

    Correct Answer
    E. Special Sensory
    Explanation
    CN1 refers to Cranial Nerve 1, also known as the olfactory nerve. The olfactory nerve is responsible for the sense of smell. Special sensory fibers are a type of nerve fibers that are involved in the special senses, such as smell, taste, vision, hearing, and balance. Therefore, CN1 has special sensory fibers, which is why the correct answer is "Special Sensory".

    Rate this question:

  • 15. 

    CN3 has what type of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Sensory

    • B.

      Motor

    • C.

      Sympathetic

    • D.

      Parasympathetic

    • E.

      Special Sensory

    Correct Answer(s)
    B. Motor
    D. Parasympathetic
    Explanation
    CN3, also known as the oculomotor nerve, contains motor fibers responsible for controlling the movement of certain eye muscles. These muscles allow for functions such as pupil constriction and eye movement. Additionally, CN3 also contains parasympathetic fibers that innervate the ciliary muscles of the eye, which control the shape of the lens and aid in focusing on nearby objects. Therefore, the correct answer is Motor and Parasympathetic.

    Rate this question:

  • 16. 

    CN 4 carries which types of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Motor

    • B.

      Sensory

    • C.

      Sympathetic

    • D.

      Parasympathetic

    • E.

      Special sensory

    Correct Answer
    A. Motor
    Explanation
    CN 4 carries motor fibers.

    Rate this question:

  • 17. 

    CN 5 carries which types of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Motor

    • B.

      Sensory

    • C.

      Sympathetic

    • D.

      Parasympathetic

    • E.

      Special sensory

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Motor
    B. Sensory
    Explanation
    CN 5 carries both motor and sensory fibers. Motor fibers are responsible for controlling the muscles of mastication and other muscles involved in chewing. Sensory fibers transmit sensory information from the face, including touch, pain, and temperature sensations, to the brain.

    Rate this question:

  • 18. 

    CN 5 V1 carries which types of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Motor

    • B.

      Sensory

    • C.

      Sympathetic

    • D.

      Parasympathetic

    • E.

      Special sensory

    Correct Answer
    B. Sensory
    Explanation
    CN 5 V1 carries sensory fibers. The trigeminal nerve (CN 5) has three main branches, and the V1 branch specifically carries sensory information from the ophthalmic region of the face. This includes sensations such as touch, pain, and temperature from the forehead, upper eyelid, and the front part of the scalp. The other branches of CN 5, V2 and V3, carry sensory fibers from different regions of the face and also contain motor fibers for muscle control.

    Rate this question:

  • 19. 

    CN 5 V2 carries which types of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Special sensory

    • B.

      Motor

    • C.

      Sensory

    • D.

      Sympathetic

    • E.

      Parasympathetic

    Correct Answer
    C. Sensory
    Explanation
    CN 5 V2 carries sensory fibers.

    Rate this question:

  • 20. 

    CN 5 V3 carries which types of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Special sensory

    • B.

      Motor

    • C.

      Sensory

    • D.

      Sympathetic

    • E.

      Parasympathetic

    Correct Answer(s)
    B. Motor
    C. Sensory
    Explanation
    CN 5 V3 carries both motor and sensory fibers. Motor fibers are responsible for controlling the muscles of mastication, while sensory fibers transmit sensations from the face, scalp, and mucous membranes of the mouth and nose. Therefore, the correct answer is motor and sensory.

    Rate this question:

  • 21. 

    CN 6 carries which types of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Special sensory

    • B.

      Motor

    • C.

      Sensory

    • D.

      Sympathetic

    • E.

      Parasympathetic

    Correct Answer
    B. Motor
    Explanation
    CN 6, also known as the abducens nerve, carries motor fibers. Motor fibers are responsible for controlling the movement of muscles. Therefore, CN 6 carries motor fibers that control the movement of the lateral rectus muscle, which is responsible for outward eye movement.

    Rate this question:

  • 22. 

    CN 7 carries which types of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Special sensory

    • B.

      Motor

    • C.

      Sensory

    • D.

      Sympathetic

    • E.

      Parasympathetic

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Special sensory
    B. Motor
    E. Parasympathetic
    Explanation
    CN 7, also known as the facial nerve, carries special sensory fibers, motor fibers, and parasympathetic fibers. Special sensory fibers are responsible for taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. Motor fibers innervate the muscles of facial expression, while parasympathetic fibers control the lacrimal gland, submandibular gland, and sublingual gland, as well as the glands in the nasal and palatine cavities. Sensory fibers, sympathetic fibers, and other types of fibers are not carried by CN 7.

    Rate this question:

  • 23. 

    CN 8 carries which types of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Special sensory

    • B.

      Motor

    • C.

      Sensory

    • D.

      Sympathetic

    • E.

      Parasympathetic

    Correct Answer
    A. Special sensory
    Explanation
    CN 8, also known as the vestibulocochlear nerve, carries special sensory fibers. These fibers are responsible for transmitting information related to hearing and balance from the inner ear to the brain. The special sensory fibers in CN 8 allow us to perceive sound and maintain our sense of equilibrium.

    Rate this question:

  • 24. 

    CN 9 carries which types of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Special sensory

    • B.

      Motor

    • C.

      Sensory

    • D.

      Sympathetic

    • E.

      Parasympathetic

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Special sensory
    B. Motor
    C. Sensory
    E. Parasympathetic
    Explanation
    CN 9 carries special sensory, motor, sensory, and parasympathetic fibers. The glossopharyngeal nerve (CN 9) is responsible for carrying special sensory fibers that provide taste sensation from the posterior one-third of the tongue, motor fibers that innervate the stylopharyngeus muscle involved in swallowing and speech, sensory fibers that transmit general sensation from the oropharynx and posterior tongue, and parasympathetic fibers that control salivation from the parotid gland.

    Rate this question:

  • 25. 

    CN 10 carries which types of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Special sensory

    • B.

      Motor

    • C.

      Sensory

    • D.

      Sympathetic

    • E.

      Parasympathetic

    Correct Answer(s)
    B. Motor
    C. Sensory
    E. Parasympathetic
    Explanation
    CN 10, also known as the Vagus nerve, carries motor, sensory, and parasympathetic fibers. Motor fibers control the muscles of the soft palate, pharynx, and larynx, allowing for swallowing and speaking. Sensory fibers transmit information from the throat, larynx, and other organs to the brain, providing sensations such as taste and touch. Parasympathetic fibers regulate the functions of various organs, including the heart, lungs, and digestive system, promoting rest and relaxation. Therefore, motor, sensory, and parasympathetic fibers are all carried by CN 10.

    Rate this question:

  • 26. 

    CN 11 carries which types of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Special sensory

    • B.

      Motor

    • C.

      Sensory

    • D.

      Sympathetic

    • E.

      Parasympathetic

    Correct Answer
    B. Motor
    Explanation
    CN 11, also known as the accessory nerve, carries motor fibers. The accessory nerve is responsible for controlling the movement of certain muscles in the head and neck, including the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles. It does not carry sensory, sympathetic, or parasympathetic fibers.

    Rate this question:

  • 27. 

    CN 12 carries which types of fibers (check all that apply).

    • A.

      Special sensory

    • B.

      Motor

    • C.

      Sensory

    • D.

      Sympathetic

    • E.

      Parasympathetic

    Correct Answer
    B. Motor
    Explanation
    CN 12, also known as the hypoglossal nerve, carries motor fibers. This means that it primarily controls the movement of the tongue. It does not carry any sensory, sympathetic, or parasympathetic fibers.

    Rate this question:

  • 28. 

    Where does CN1 exit the skull?

    • A.

      Optic Canal

    • B.

      Foramen Rotundum

    • C.

      Sup. Orbital Fissure

    • D.

      Foramen Ovale

    • E.

      Stylomastoid Foramen

    • F.

      Foramen Lacerum

    • G.

      Internal Auditory Meatus

    • H.

      External Auditory Meatus

    • I.

      Jugular Foramen

    • J.

      Foramen Magnum

    • K.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    K. None of the above
    Explanation
    The fibers of the olfactory nerve enter the nasal mucosa via the cribriform plate of ethmoid

    Rate this question:

  • 29. 

    Where does CN2 exit the skull?

    • A.

      Optic Canal

    • B.

      Foramen Rotundum

    • C.

      Sup. Orbital Fissure

    • D.

      Foramen Ovale

    • E.

      Stylomastoid Foramen

    • F.

      Foramen Lacerum

    • G.

      Internal Auditory Meatus

    • H.

      External Auditory Meatus

    • I.

      Jugular Foramen

    • J.

      Foramen Magnum

    Correct Answer
    A. Optic Canal
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Optic Canal. The optic canal is a small bony canal located in the sphenoid bone of the skull. It is situated in the middle cranial fossa and allows for the passage of the optic nerve (CN2) from the orbit to the cranial cavity. The optic canal is specifically designed to protect and support the optic nerve as it exits the skull and enters the eye socket.

    Rate this question:

  • 30. 

    Where does CN3 exit the skull?

    • A.

      Optic Canal

    • B.

      Foramen Rotundum

    • C.

      Sup. Orbital Fissure

    • D.

      Foramen Ovale

    • E.

      Stylomastoid Foramen

    • F.

      Foramen Lacerum

    • G.

      Internal Auditory Meatus

    • H.

      External Auditory Meatus

    • I.

      Jugular Foramen

    • J.

      Foramen Magnum

    Correct Answer
    C. Sup. Orbital Fissure
    Explanation
    CN3, also known as the oculomotor nerve, exits the skull through the Superior Orbital Fissure. The Superior Orbital Fissure is a small opening located in the sphenoid bone, which is a bone of the skull. This fissure allows the oculomotor nerve, along with other structures such as the ophthalmic nerve, to pass from the inside of the skull to the orbit (eye socket).

    Rate this question:

  • 31. 

    Where does CN5 V1 exit the skull?

    • A.

      Optic Canal

    • B.

      Foramen Rotundum

    • C.

      Sup. Orbital Fissure

    • D.

      Foramen Ovale

    • E.

      Stylomastoid Foramen

    • F.

      Foramen Lacerum

    • G.

      Internal Auditory Meatus

    • H.

      External Auditory Meatus

    • I.

      Jugular Foramen

    • J.

      Foramen Magnum

    Correct Answer
    C. Sup. Orbital Fissure
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Superior Orbital Fissure.

    Rate this question:

  • 32. 

    Where does CN5 V2 exit the skull?

    • A.

      Optic Canal

    • B.

      Foramen Rotundum

    • C.

      Sup. Orbital Fissure

    • D.

      Foramen Ovale

    • E.

      Stylomastoid Foramen

    • F.

      Foramen Lacerum

    • G.

      Internal Auditory Meatus

    • H.

      External Auditory Meatus

    • I.

      Jugular Foramen

    • J.

      Foramen Magnum

    Correct Answer
    B. Foramen Rotundum
    Explanation
    CN5 V2 exits the skull through the Foramen Rotundum.

    Rate this question:

  • 33. 

    Where does CN5 V3 exit the skull?

    • A.

      Optic Canal

    • B.

      Foramen Rotundum

    • C.

      Sup. Orbital Fissure

    • D.

      Foramen Ovale

    • E.

      Stylomastoid Foramen

    • F.

      Foramen Lacerum

    • G.

      Internal Auditory Meatus

    • H.

      External Auditory Meatus

    • I.

      Jugular Foramen

    • J.

      Foramen Magnum

    Correct Answer
    D. Foramen Ovale
    Explanation
    CN5 V3, also known as the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve, exits the skull through the Foramen Ovale. This foramen is located in the greater wing of the sphenoid bone, which is a part of the skull. The mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve carries sensory information from the lower face, including the jaw, lower teeth, and gums. It also innervates the muscles involved in chewing. Therefore, the Foramen Ovale is the correct exit point for CN5 V3.

    Rate this question:

  • 34. 

    Where does CN6 exit the skull?

    • A.

      Optic Canal

    • B.

      Foramen Rotundum

    • C.

      Sup. Orbital Fissure

    • D.

      Foramen Ovale

    • E.

      Stylomastoid Foramen

    • F.

      Foramen Lacerum

    • G.

      Internal Auditory Meatus

    • H.

      External Auditory Meatus

    • I.

      Jugular Foramen

    • J.

      Foramen Magnum

    Correct Answer
    C. Sup. Orbital Fissure
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Sup. Orbital Fissure. CN6, also known as the abducens nerve, exits the skull through the superior orbital fissure. The superior orbital fissure is a narrow opening located between the greater and lesser wings of the sphenoid bone. It allows for the passage of several structures, including the abducens nerve, as it travels from the brain to innervate the lateral rectus muscle of the eye.

    Rate this question:

  • 35. 

    CN 7 enters (1st answer), and exits (2nd answer) which foramen?

    • A.

      Optic Canal

    • B.

      Foramen Rotundum

    • C.

      Sup. Orbital Fissure

    • D.

      Foramen Ovale

    • E.

      Stylomastoid Foramen

    • F.

      Foramen Lacerum

    • G.

      Internal Auditory Meatus

    • H.

      External Auditory Meatus

    • I.

      Jugular Foramen

    • J.

      Foramen Magnum

    Correct Answer(s)
    E. Stylomastoid Foramen
    G. Internal Auditory Meatus
    Explanation
    CN7 enters the internal auditory meatus and exits the stylomastoid foramen

    Rate this question:

  • 36. 

    Where does CN 12 exit the skull?

    • A.

      Optic Canal

    • B.

      Foramen Rotundum

    • C.

      Sup. Orbital Fissure

    • D.

      Foramen Ovale

    • E.

      Stylomastoid Foramen

    • F.

      Foramen Lacerum

    • G.

      Internal Auditory Meatus

    • H.

      External Auditory Meatus

    • I.

      Jugular Foramen

    • J.

      Foramen Magnum

    • K.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    K. None of the above
    Explanation
    Hypoglossal Canal

    Rate this question:

  • 37. 

    The nerve supply for the lateral pterygoid muscle is the V3 Mandibular branch called the lateral pterygoid nerve.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The lateral pterygoid muscle is innervated by the V3 mandibular branch, specifically the lateral pterygoid nerve. This nerve supplies the necessary motor function to the muscle, allowing it to perform its actions, such as opening and closing the jaw and assisting in chewing. Therefore, the statement is true.

    Rate this question:

  • 38. 

    The lingual nerve is a branch of V3 mandibular.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The lingual nerve is indeed a branch of V3 mandibular. V3 mandibular is one of the three divisions of the trigeminal nerve, which is responsible for providing sensory innervation to the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The lingual nerve specifically carries sensory information from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, as well as the floor of the mouth. Therefore, the statement that the lingual nerve is a branch of V3 mandibular is correct.

    Rate this question:

  • 39. 

    The mental nerve exits the infraorbital foramen.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Exits the mental foramen

    Rate this question:

  • 40. 

    Chorda Tympani is part of CN7.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The Chorda Tympani is a branch of the facial nerve (CN7) that supplies taste sensation to the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. Therefore, it is accurate to say that the Chorda Tympani is part of CN7.

    Rate this question:

  • 41. 

    Where does CN 8 exit the skull?

    • A.

      Optic Canal

    • B.

      Foramen Rotundum

    • C.

      Sup. Orbital Fissure

    • D.

      Foramen Ovale

    • E.

      Stylomastoid Foramen

    • F.

      Foramen Lacerum

    • G.

      Internal Auditory Meatus

    • H.

      External Auditory Meatus

    • I.

      Jugular Foramen

    • J.

      Foramen Magnum

    • K.

      None of the Above

    Correct Answer
    K. None of the Above
    Explanation
    CN8 does not exit the skull, it innervates the cochlea and vestibular apparatus inside the skull.

    Rate this question:

  • 42. 

    Where does CN 10 exit the skull?

    • A.

      Optic Canal

    • B.

      Foramen Rotundum

    • C.

      Sup. Orbital Fissure

    • D.

      Foramen Ovale

    • E.

      Stylomastoid Foramen

    • F.

      Foramen Lacerum

    • G.

      Internal Auditory Meatus

    • H.

      External Auditory Meatus

    • I.

      Jugular Foramen

    • J.

      Foramen Magnum

    • K.

      None of the Above

    Correct Answer
    I. Jugular Foramen
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Jugular Foramen. The cranial nerve 10, also known as the vagus nerve, exits the skull through the jugular foramen. This opening is located in the base of the skull, at the junction between the temporal and occipital bones. The vagus nerve is responsible for various functions, including controlling the muscles of the throat and voice box, regulating heart rate and blood pressure, and contributing to the digestive system.

    Rate this question:

  • 43. 

    Where does CN 11 exit the skull?

    • A.

      Optic Canal

    • B.

      Foramen Rotundum

    • C.

      Sup. Orbital Fissure

    • D.

      Foramen Ovale

    • E.

      Stylomastoid Foramen

    • F.

      Foramen Lacerum

    • G.

      Internal Auditory Meatus

    • H.

      External Auditory Meatus

    • I.

      Jugular Foramen

    • J.

      Foramen Magnum

    • K.

      None of the Above

    Correct Answer
    I. Jugular Foramen
    Explanation
    CN 11, also known as the accessory nerve, exits the skull through the Jugular Foramen. This is a large opening located at the base of the skull, near the junction of the occipital and temporal bones. The Jugular Foramen is an important passageway for several structures, including the glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX), vagus nerve (CN X), and the internal jugular vein.

    Rate this question:

  • 44. 

    Where does CN 9 exit the skull?

    • A.

      Optic Canal

    • B.

      Foramen Rotundum

    • C.

      Sup. Orbital Fissure

    • D.

      Foramen Ovale

    • E.

      Stylomastoid Foramen

    • F.

      Foramen Lacerum

    • G.

      Internal Auditory Meatus

    • H.

      External Auditory Meatus

    • I.

      Jugular Foramen

    • J.

      Foramen Magnum

    • K.

      None of the Above

    Correct Answer
    I. Jugular Foramen
    Explanation
    The glossopharyngeal nerve (CN 9) exits the skull through the Jugular Foramen.

    Rate this question:

Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 21, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Oct 23, 2012
    Quiz Created by
    Mackmr

Related Topics

Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.