Cranial Nerves: Ultimate MCQ Test! Quiz

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Cranial Nerves: Ultimate MCQ Test! Quiz - Quiz


Did you know that there are twelve pairs of cranial nerves? They each come out individually from the brain stem, which is the lower part of the brain that connects the brain and the spinal cord. Each cranial nerve performs a specific job or task, and some have both sensory and motor impacts. This quiz will teach you about cranial nerves. Make sure you take your certificate when you are done with the quiz.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Mixed; Medulla, jugular foreman Pharynx, larynx, visceral organs in thorax and abdomen

    • A.

      V Trigeminal

    • B.

      VII Facial

    • C.

      IX Glossopharyngeal

    • D.

      X Vagus

    • E.

      XII Hypoglossal

    Correct Answer
    D. X Vagus
    Explanation
    The vagus nerve (X) is responsible for innervating the pharynx, larynx, and visceral organs in the thorax and abdomen. This nerve plays a crucial role in controlling various bodily functions such as swallowing, speech, and regulation of heart rate and digestion. The other nerves listed (V Trigeminal, VII Facial, IX Glossopharyngeal, XII Hypoglossal) are not directly involved in innervating these specific structures and functions mentioned in the question.

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  • 2. 

    Motor; Midbrain; Superior orbital fissure; Superior, medial, inferior rectus; inferior oblique, movement of the eyeball

    • A.

      IV Trochlear

    • B.

      III Oculomotor

    • C.

      XII Hypoglossal

    • D.

      VIII Vestibulochochlear

    • E.

      XI Accessory

    Correct Answer
    B. III Oculomotor
    Explanation
    The correct answer is III Oculomotor. The oculomotor nerve is responsible for the movement of the eyeball. It innervates the superior, medial, and inferior rectus muscles, as well as the inferior oblique muscle. The oculomotor nerve originates from the midbrain and exits the skull through the superior orbital fissure. The other nerves listed (IV Trochlear, VIII Vestibulocochlear, XI Accessory, and XII Hypoglossal) are not involved in the movement of the eyeball.

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  • 3. 

    Mixed; pons, internal auditory meatus; stylomastoid foreman; Taste: anterior 2/3 of tongue Motor: facial expression Lesion: Bell's palsy

    • A.

      IV Trochlear

    • B.

      V Trigeminal

    • C.

      VII Facial

    • D.

      X Vagus

    • E.

      VI Abducens

    Correct Answer
    C. VII Facial
    Explanation
    The correct answer is VII Facial. The facial nerve is responsible for both taste sensation in the anterior 2/3 of the tongue and motor control of facial expression. A lesion or damage to the facial nerve can result in Bell's palsy, which is characterized by weakness or paralysis of the muscles on one side of the face.

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  • 4. 

    Motor; pons; superior orbital fissure; Lateral rectus muscle

    • A.

      VI Abducens

    • B.

      II Optic

    • C.

      V Trigeminal

    • D.

      VIII Vestibulochoclear

    • E.

      IX Glossopharyngeal

    Correct Answer
    A. VI Abducens
    Explanation
    The given answer, VI Abducens, refers to the cranial nerve responsible for innervating the lateral rectus muscle. The lateral rectus muscle is responsible for the abduction of the eye, meaning it moves the eye laterally away from the midline. The other cranial nerves mentioned in the question, II Optic, V Trigeminal, VIII Vestibulochoclear, and IX Glossopharyngeal, are not directly related to the function of the lateral rectus muscle.

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  • 5. 

    Sensory; Nasal mucosa > cribiform plate > olfactory bulb > tract > olfactory area Smell

    • A.

      II Optic

    • B.

      XI Accessory

    • C.

      III Oculomotor

    • D.

      IX Glossopharyngeal

    • E.

      I Olfactory

    Correct Answer
    E. I Olfactory
    Explanation
    The correct answer is I Olfactory because the pathway described in the question matches the pathway for the sense of smell. The sensory information from the nasal mucosa travels through the cribiform plate to reach the olfactory bulb, then continues along the olfactory tract to finally reach the olfactory area in the brain.

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  • 6. 

    Motor; medulla, hypoglossal canal Movement of tongue

    • A.

      XII Hypoglossal

    • B.

      V Trigeminal

    • C.

      III Oculomotor

    • D.

      X Vagus

    • E.

      VIII Vestibulochoclear

    Correct Answer
    A. XII Hypoglossal
    Explanation
    The correct answer is XII Hypoglossal. The hypoglossal nerve, also known as cranial nerve XII, controls the movement of the tongue. It innervates the muscles of the tongue, allowing for speech, swallowing, and other movements of the tongue. The other cranial nerves listed in the options have different functions and are not directly involved in the movement of the tongue.

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  • 7. 

    Sensory; retina > optic foreman > optic chiasm > optic tract > thalmus > primary visual area Vision Lesion: blindness/anopia

    • A.

      I Olfactory

    • B.

      VIII Vestibulochoclear

    • C.

      II Optic

    • D.

      XI Accessory

    • E.

      VII Facial

    Correct Answer
    C. II Optic
    Explanation
    The correct answer is II Optic. This is because the optic nerve carries visual information from the retina to the brain. If there is a lesion or damage to the optic nerve, it can result in blindness or anopia, which is the loss of vision in one or both eyes.

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  • 8. 

    Motor; medulla & C1-C5; Jugular foreman Sternocleidomastoid, trapezius

    • A.

      III Oculomotor

    • B.

      IV Trochlear

    • C.

      X Vagus

    • D.

      XI Accessory

    • E.

      VIII Vestibulochoclear

    Correct Answer
    D. XI Accessory
    Explanation
    The given answer, XI Accessory, is correct because the question is asking for the cranial nerve that innervates the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. The XI Accessory nerve, also known as the spinal accessory nerve, is responsible for controlling these muscles, which are involved in head and neck movements. The other cranial nerves listed in the question have different functions and do not innervate these specific muscles.

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  • 9. 

    Sensory; pons; internal auditory meatus Equilibrium, hearing

    • A.

      I Olfactory

    • B.

      VIII Vestibulochoclear

    • C.

      V Trigeminal

    • D.

      VI Abducens

    • E.

      VII Facial

    Correct Answer
    B. VIII Vestibulochoclear
    Explanation
    The sensory function of the vestibulochoclear nerve (CN VIII) includes both equilibrium and hearing. The pons is the location where CN VIII originates, and it passes through the internal auditory meatus, which is a bony canal in the temporal bone. Therefore, the correct answer is VIII Vestibulochoclear.

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  • 10. 

    Motor; Midbrain; Superior orbital fissure Superior oblique muscle

    • A.

      IV Trochlear

    • B.

      V Trigeminal

    • C.

      IX Glossopharyngeal

    • D.

      X Vagus

    • E.

      XI Accessory

    Correct Answer
    A. IV Trochlear
    Explanation
    The IV Trochlear nerve innervates the superior oblique muscle, which is responsible for downward and outward eye movement. It emerges from the midbrain and passes through the superior orbital fissure to reach the muscle.

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  • 11. 

    Mixed; Medulla, jugular foremanTaste: posterior 1/3 of toungeMotor: elevates pharynx

    • A.

      VIII Vestibulochoclear

    • B.

      IX Glossopharyngeal

    • C.

      X Vagus

    • D.

      XI Accessory

    • E.

      XII Hypoglossal

    Correct Answer
    B. IX Glossopharyngeal
    Explanation
    The correct answer is IX Glossopharyngeal. The glossopharyngeal nerve is responsible for taste sensation in the posterior 1/3 of the tongue and motor function that elevates the pharynx. It is one of the cranial nerves involved in the control of swallowing and speech.

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  • 12. 

    Mixed; pons, ophthalmic, Superior orbital fissure, maxillary, foreman rotundum, mandibular, foreman ovale, mandibular foreman, mental foreman Sensory: Skin, muscle, mucosa, tooth Motor: Chewing muscles Lesion: neuralgia

    • A.

      II Oculomotor

    • B.

      III Trochlear

    • C.

      VI Abducens

    • D.

      V Trigeminal

    • E.

      X Vagus

    Correct Answer
    D. V Trigeminal
    Explanation
    The correct answer is V Trigeminal because the Trigeminal nerve is responsible for both sensory and motor functions related to the face. It has three branches - ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular - which innervate different areas of the face. The sensory branches provide sensation to the skin, muscle, mucosa, and teeth, while the motor branch controls the chewing muscles. A lesion in the Trigeminal nerve can cause neuralgia, which is a type of severe facial pain.

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