Cranial Nerves Anatomy Exam Quiz! Trivia

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Cranial Nerves Anatomy Exam Quiz! Trivia - Quiz

Cranial nerves are pairs of nerves connected to the brain to different head, neck, and trunk parts. Each nerve has a corresponding Roman numeral between I and XII, based on their location from front to back. This quiz has been created to test your knowledge about Cranial Nerve, including anatomy, function, and dysfunctions. Let's take this quiz.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    CN ____ is responsible for the balance.

    • A.

      VIII

    • B.

      VII

    • C.

      XI

    • D.

      X

    Correct Answer
    A. VIII
    Explanation
    The Roman numeral VIII represents the number 8. In this context, "balance" could refer to the equilibrium or harmony in a system or situation. The number 8 is symmetrical and can be divided into two equal parts, which could symbolize balance. Therefore, VIII is the most suitable option as it represents balance.

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  • 2. 

    __________ is responsible for tongue lateralization (word, not number).

    • A.

      Glossopharyngeal

    • B.

      Hypoglossal

    Correct Answer
    B. Hypoglossal
    Explanation
    The hypoglossal nerve is responsible for tongue lateralization. The glossopharyngeal nerve, on the other hand, is responsible for other functions such as taste and swallowing. Tongue lateralization refers to the movement of the tongue from side to side, and this movement is controlled by the hypoglossal nerve.

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  • 3. 

    A dysfunction in which of the following nerves would cause anosmia?

    • A.

      I

    • B.

      II

    • C.

      III

    • D.

      XI

    • E.

      IX

    Correct Answer
    A. I
    Explanation
    If dysfunction occurs in the first cranial nerve (olfactory nerve), it can lead to anosmia, which is the loss of the sense of smell. The olfactory nerve is responsible for transmitting signals related to smell from the nose to the brain. Therefore, any impairment or damage to this nerve can result in a loss of the ability to detect odors.

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  • 4. 

    Tic Doulereux is a problem associated with which CN?

    • A.

      Trochlear

    • B.

      Trigeminal

    • C.

      Abducens

    • D.

      Facial

    Correct Answer
    B. Trigeminal
    Explanation
    Tic Doulereux, also known as trigeminal neuralgia, is a problem associated with the trigeminal cranial nerve (CN V). This condition is characterized by sudden, severe facial pain that is often triggered by normal activities such as eating or talking. The trigeminal nerve is responsible for transmitting sensory information from the face to the brain, and any disruption or damage to this nerve can result in the symptoms of Tic Doulereux.

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  • 5. 

    If the Optic nerve is cut at the optic chaism, what kind of deficit to vision will occur?

    • A.

      Tunnel vision, bitemporal heteronymous hemianopia

    • B.

      Monocular blindness

    • C.

      Contralateral homonymous hemianopia

    Correct Answer
    A. Tunnel vision, bitemporal heteronymous hemianopia
    Explanation
    When the optic nerve is cut at the optic chiasm, it results in tunnel vision and bitemporal heteronymous hemianopia. Tunnel vision refers to a condition where the person's visual field is narrowed, causing them to only see objects directly in front of them. Bitemporal heteronymous hemianopia, on the other hand, is a type of visual field defect where there is loss of vision in the outer (temporal) half of both visual fields. This means that the person will have difficulty seeing objects on the sides, while maintaining central vision.

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  • 6. 

    If both eyes turn in, which CN is likely injured?

    • A.

      Abducens

    • B.

      Oculomotor

    • C.

      Trochlear

    Correct Answer
    A. Abducens
    Explanation
    If both eyes turn in, it suggests that there is a problem with the lateral rectus muscle, which is responsible for outward eye movement. The abducens nerve (CN VI) innervates the lateral rectus muscle, so if both eyes turn in, it is likely that the abducens nerve is injured.

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  • 7. 

    Bell's Palsy is associated with which nerve?

    • A.

      Trigeminal

    • B.

      Vagus

    • C.

      Accessory

    • D.

      Facial

    Correct Answer
    D. Facial
    Explanation
    Bell's Palsy is a condition characterized by sudden weakness or paralysis of the muscles on one side of the face. It is caused by inflammation or compression of the facial nerve, also known as the seventh cranial nerve. The facial nerve controls the muscles responsible for facial expressions, taste, and tear production. Therefore, it is associated with Bell's Palsy, making the correct answer Facial.

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  • 8. 

    If the optic nerve is lesioned at the tract, what will you get?

    • A.

      Tunnel vision

    • B.

      Contralateral homonymous hemianopia

    • C.

      Monocular blindness

    Correct Answer
    B. Contralateral homonymous hemianopia
    Explanation
    If the optic nerve is lesioned at the tract, it will result in contralateral homonymous hemianopia. This means that there will be a loss of vision in the outer half of the visual field in one eye and the inner half of the visual field in the other eye. This occurs because the optic nerve fibers from each eye cross over at the optic chiasm, and a lesion at the optic tract will affect the visual information from both eyes on the opposite side of the brain.

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  • 9. 

    A balance dysfunction is probably due to which nerve:

    • A.

      IV

    • B.

      V

    • C.

      VIII

    • D.

      VII

    • E.

      IX

    Correct Answer
    C. VIII
    Explanation
    A balance dysfunction is likely due to the VIII nerve, also known as the vestibulocochlear nerve. This nerve is responsible for transmitting sensory information from the inner ear to the brain, including information related to balance and spatial orientation. Dysfunction of this nerve can result in symptoms such as dizziness, vertigo, and difficulty maintaining balance.

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  • 10. 

    A person with a hoarse or "trill" voice may have problems with which cranial nerve?

    • A.

      X

    • B.

      IX

    • C.

      XII

    Correct Answer
    A. X
    Explanation
    A person with a hoarse or "trill" voice may have problems with the cranial nerve X, also known as the vagus nerve. The vagus nerve is responsible for controlling the muscles of the larynx, which is involved in producing sound. If there is an issue with the vagus nerve, it can result in vocal cord paralysis or weakness, leading to a hoarse or trill voice.

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  • 11. 

    Oculo Opthalmaplegia involves the following nerves. Pick the one that doesn't belong.

    • A.

      III

    • B.

      IV

    • C.

      V

    • D.

      VI

    Correct Answer
    C. V
    Explanation
    The correct answer is V. The question is asking to identify the nerve that doesn't belong in Oculo Opthalmaplegia. Oculo Opthalmaplegia is a condition that affects the movement of the eye muscles. The nerves involved in this condition are III (oculomotor nerve), IV (trochlear nerve), and VI (abducens nerve). These nerves control the movement of the eye in different directions. However, nerve V (trigeminal nerve) is not involved in the movement of the eye muscles and is therefore the odd one out in this context.

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  • 12. 

    Which of the following is NOT purely sensory?

    • A.

      I

    • B.

      II

    • C.

      III

    • D.

      VIII

    Correct Answer
    C. III
    Explanation
    The given question asks for something that is not purely sensory. Sensory refers to the senses, such as sight, hearing, taste, touch, and smell. Option III is not purely sensory because it is a Roman numeral and does not represent any sensory experience. Options I, II, and VIII could potentially represent sensory experiences, but without further information, it is not possible to determine their nature.

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  • 13. 

    Which Nerve innervates the superior oblique muscle?

    • A.

      IV

    • B.

      V

    • C.

      VI

    • D.

      III

    Correct Answer
    A. IV
    Explanation
    The superior oblique muscle is innervated by the trochlear nerve, which is also known as cranial nerve IV. This nerve is responsible for controlling the movement of the superior oblique muscle, which helps in rotating the eye downwards and outwards.

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  • 14. 

    Which cranial nerve is responsible for taste on the posterior part of the tongue?

    • A.

      Facial

    • B.

      Glossopharyngeal

    • C.

      Hypoglossal

    Correct Answer
    B. Glossopharyngeal
    Explanation
    The cranial nerve responsible for taste on the posterior part of the tongue is the Glossopharyngeal nerve. This nerve carries sensory information from the taste buds located at the back of the tongue to the brain. It also plays a role in other functions such as swallowing and salivation. The Facial nerve is responsible for taste on the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, while the Hypoglossal nerve controls the movement of the tongue.

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  • 15. 

    Which nerve is often called the "Wanderer"?

    • A.

      Vagus

    • B.

      Trigeminal

    • C.

      Trochlear

    • D.

      Accessory

    Correct Answer
    A. Vagus
    Explanation
    The nerve often called the "Wanderer" is the Vagus nerve. This is because the Vagus nerve is the longest cranial nerve, and it wanders throughout the body, innervating various organs and structures. It is responsible for controlling functions such as digestion, heart rate, and breathing.

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  • 16. 

    Which nerve innervates the SCM and upper trapezius?

    • A.

      Vagus

    • B.

      Vestibulocochlear

    • C.

      Abducens

    • D.

      Accessory

    Correct Answer
    D. Accessory
    Explanation
    The Accessory nerve, also known as the Cranial Nerve XI, innervates the Sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and upper trapezius muscles. This nerve plays a crucial role in controlling the movement of these muscles, which are responsible for various actions such as rotating the head, flexing the neck, and shrugging the shoulders.

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  • 17. 

    Which nerve is responsible for taste on the anterior 2/3s of the tongue?

    • A.

      Hypoglossal

    • B.

      Glossopharyngeal

    • C.

      Facial

    Correct Answer
    C. Facial
    Explanation
    The facial nerve is responsible for taste on the anterior 2/3s of the tongue. This nerve carries taste sensations from the taste buds located on the front two-thirds of the tongue to the brain. The other nerves listed, hypoglossal and glossopharyngeal, are not involved in taste sensation on the tongue.

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  • 18. 

    Which cranial nerve is associated with pupil constriction?

    • A.

      II

    • B.

      III

    Correct Answer
    B. III
    Explanation
    The correct answer is III. Cranial nerve III, also known as the oculomotor nerve, is responsible for controlling the movement of the eye muscles, including the muscles that constrict the pupil. When this nerve is activated, it causes the pupil to constrict, allowing less light to enter the eye. Therefore, cranial nerve III is associated with pupil constriction.

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  • 19. 

    Which cranial nerve does not come from the pons?

    • A.

      VII

    • B.

      VIII

    • C.

      VI

    • D.

      II

    Correct Answer
    D. II
    Explanation
    Cranial nerve II, also known as the optic nerve, is responsible for transmitting visual information from the retina to the brain. It originates from the diencephalon, specifically the optic chiasm, and not from the pons. The pons, on the other hand, gives rise to cranial nerves V, VI, VII, and VIII. Therefore, cranial nerve II is the correct answer as it does not come from the pons.

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  • 20. 

    Cranial Nerve I is

    • A.

      Phylogenetically old

    • B.

      Tied to limbic system

    • C.

      Tied to hippocampus

    • D.

      Derived from telencephalon

    • E.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    E. All of the above
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "all of the above" because Cranial Nerve I, also known as the Olfactory Nerve, is phylogenetically old, meaning it has been present in evolution for a long time. It is tied to the limbic system, which is responsible for emotions and memory, including the hippocampus. Additionally, Cranial Nerve I is derived from the telencephalon, which is the most advanced part of the brain. Therefore, all of these statements are true about Cranial Nerve I.

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  • 21. 

    Nystagmus is produced because of central connections, via the _______, between the afferent information carried over Cranial Nerve _____ and motor output of CN _______.

    • A.

      Internal vapsule, V, II

    • B.

      Medial Longitudinal Fasciculus, VIII, III/IV/VI

    • C.

      Reticular Formation, VIII, II

    • D.

      None

    Correct Answer
    B. Medial Longitudinal Fasciculus, VIII, III/IV/VI
    Explanation
    Nystagmus is produced because of central connections, via the Medial Longitudinal Fasciculus (MLF), between the afferent information carried over Cranial Nerve VIII and motor output of CN III/IV/VI. The MLF is a bundle of nerve fibers that connects the vestibular nuclei (carrying afferent information from the inner ear) to the oculomotor nuclei (controlling eye movements). This connection allows for the coordination of eye movements and helps to maintain stable vision during head movements. Dysfunction in the MLF can lead to abnormal eye movements, such as nystagmus.

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  • 22. 

    If someone could not produce tears, which CN may be damaged?

    • A.

      Optic

    • B.

      Oculomotor

    • C.

      Facial

    • D.

      Glossopharnyngeal

    Correct Answer
    C. Facial
    Explanation
    If someone is unable to produce tears, it suggests damage to the Facial cranial nerve. The Facial nerve controls the muscles responsible for tear production, so damage to this nerve would result in a decrease or absence of tears. The other cranial nerves listed (Optic, Oculomotor, and Glossopharyngeal) are not directly involved in tear production.

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  • 23. 

    Which of the following is not an SSA nerve?

    • A.

      II

    • B.

      III

    • C.

      VIII

    Correct Answer
    B. III
    Explanation
    The question is asking for a nerve that is not part of the SSA (Special Sensory Afferent) category. SSA nerves are responsible for special sensory functions such as vision, hearing, and balance. Option III does not represent any specific nerve, so it cannot be classified as an SSA nerve.

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  • 24. 

    Which CN carries whte afferent part of the pupillary light reflex?

    • A.

      II

    • B.

      III

    Correct Answer
    A. II
    Explanation
    CN II, also known as the optic nerve, carries the afferent part of the pupillary light reflex. This means that it transmits the sensory information from the retina to the brain, allowing the brain to process and interpret the incoming light signals. In the pupillary light reflex, when light is shone into one eye, CN II carries the information about the light stimulus to the brain, which then sends signals through CN III (oculomotor nerve) to constrict the pupil of that eye. Therefore, CN II is responsible for transmitting the afferent information in the pupillary light reflex.

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  • 25. 

    If someone had trouble with speech and swallowing and the larynx, which n. may be to blame?

    • A.

      X

    • B.

      XI

    • C.

      IX

    • D.

      XII

    Correct Answer
    A. X
    Explanation
    The nerve that may be to blame for someone having trouble with speech and swallowing and the larynx is the Xth cranial nerve, also known as the Vagus nerve. This nerve provides motor innervation to the muscles of the larynx, which are responsible for speech and swallowing. Dysfunction of the Vagus nerve can lead to difficulty in controlling these muscles, resulting in speech and swallowing problems.

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  • 26. 

    Which of the following does not go to the pharynx?

    • A.

      IX

    • B.

      X

    • C.

      XI

    Correct Answer
    C. XI
    Explanation
    The pharynx is a muscular tube that connects the nasal cavity and mouth to the esophagus and larynx. Cranial nerves IX (glossopharyngeal) and X (vagus) both innervate the pharynx, while cranial nerve XI (accessory) does not directly innervate the pharynx. Instead, cranial nerve XI primarily innervates the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles, which are involved in head and neck movements. Therefore, cranial nerve XI does not go to the pharynx.

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  • 27. 

    Which CN is responsible for mastication?

    • A.

      V

    • B.

      VII

    • C.

      VIII

    • D.

      I

    Correct Answer
    A. V
    Explanation
    CN V, also known as the trigeminal nerve, is responsible for mastication, or the process of chewing. It is the largest cranial nerve and has three major branches that innervate the muscles of mastication, allowing for the movement of the jaw during chewing. This nerve also provides sensory information from the face, including touch, temperature, and pain sensations. Therefore, CN V is the correct answer for the question.

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  • 28. 

    If you have a loss of the corneal reflex, which CN may be involved?

    • A.

      V

    • B.

      II

    • C.

      III

    Correct Answer
    A. V
    Explanation
    If you have a loss of the corneal reflex, CN V (trigeminal nerve) may be involved. The corneal reflex is mediated by the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve (CN V1), which carries sensory information from the cornea to the brainstem. Damage or dysfunction of CN V can result in a loss of the corneal reflex, leading to an inability to blink or close the eye in response to corneal stimulation.

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  • 29. 

    Which CN is responsible for salivation?

    • A.

      IX

    • B.

      XI

    • C.

      XII

    • D.

      IV

    Correct Answer
    A. IX
    Explanation
    The cranial nerve responsible for salivation is the IX cranial nerve, also known as the glossopharyngeal nerve. This nerve innervates the salivary glands and controls the production and release of saliva in the mouth.

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