How Well Do You Know Couplets?

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 556

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How Well Do You Know Couplets? - Quiz

In poetry, a couplet is a pair of lines in a verse. It usually consists of two successive lines that rhyme and have the same meter. What do you know about poetry? Take this quiz to test your knowledge.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A formal couplet is also known as...
    • A. 

      Standard

    • B. 

      Support

    • C. 

      Closed

    • D. 

      Order

  • 2. 
    A run-on couplet is also referred to as...
    • A. 

      Standard

    • B. 

      Tapped

    • C. 

      Order

    • D. 

      Open

  • 3. 
    Each of the two lines in a couplet is...
    • A. 

      Coupled

    • B. 

      Rhymed

    • C. 

      End-stopped

    • D. 

      Versed

  • 4. 
    The lines in a couplet have the same...
    • A. 

      Meter

    • B. 

      Line

    • C. 

      Tone

    • D. 

      Tune

  • 5. 
    The lines in a formal couplet are...
    • A. 

      End-stopped

    • B. 

      Together

    • C. 

      Stopped

    • D. 

      Formal

  • 6. 
    The meaning of the first line continuing to the second is called...
    • A. 

      Opening

    • B. 

      Tuning

    • C. 

      Closure

    • D. 

      Enjambment

  • 7. 
    When the lines form a bounded grammatical unit like a sentence, the couplet is...
    • A. 

      Accurate

    • B. 

      Stopped

    • C. 

      Ended

    • D. 

      Closed

  • 8. 
    Couplets in Iambic pentameter are called...
    • A. 

      Standards

    • B. 

      Trade stanzas

    • C. 

      Mousse verses

    • D. 

      Heroic couplets

  • 9. 
    Which of these poetries adopted the rhyming couplet system?
    • A. 

      Coming Home

    • B. 

      Titanic

    • C. 

      The Canterbury Tales

    • D. 

      The Good Child

  • 10. 
    Which of these is a form of couplet?
    • A. 

      Epigram

    • B. 

      Rhyme

    • C. 

      Poem

    • D. 

      Stanza

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