What Are Concurrent Powers? Quiz

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What Are Concurrent Powers? Quiz - Quiz


Dive into the realm of governmental authority with our "Concurrent Powers" quiz! Explore the dynamic concept of concurrent powers, where both federal and state governments wield authority over the same domains. Test your knowledge on this intricate balance as you navigate questions that unravel the shared responsibilities between these entities. Will you emerge as a master of understanding the delicate dance between federal and state jurisdictions?

Uncover the nuances of concurrent powers, from taxation to law enforcement, and grasp the intricate web that shapes our governance. Challenge yourself and fellow quiz-takers to unravel the complexities of this constitutional interplay. Become Read morea connoisseur of governmental dynamics and gain insights into the harmonious collaboration of powers. Are you ready to explore the overlapping territories of governance? Embark on this quiz journey now!


Concurrent Powers Questions and Answers

  • 1. 

    What is the name for the constitutional guarantee (in the Tenth Amendment) that the states retain government authority not explicitly granted to the national government?

    • A.

      Concurrent powers

    • B.

      . Granted powers

    • C.

      Reserved powers

    • D.

      National powers

    Correct Answer
    C. Reserved powers
    Explanation
    The Tenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution explicitly states that any powers not delegated to the federal government, nor prohibited to the states, are reserved to the states or the people. This provision ensures a balance of power by limiting federal overreach and empowering states to manage their own affairs in areas not explicitly covered by federal law, thereby preserving a system of decentralization and local control.

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  • 2. 

    What is the name for the constitutional requirement (in Article 4, Section 1) that each state recognizes and upholds laws passed by any other state? 

    • A.

      Elastic clause

    • B.

      Supremacy clause

    • C.

      Full faith and credit clause

    • D.

      Necessary and proper clause

    Correct Answer
    C. Full faith and credit clause
    Explanation
    The Full Faith and Credit Clause, found in Article IV, Section 1 of the Constitution, mandates that each state must respect the "public acts, records, and judicial proceedings" of every other state. This clause is crucial for promoting unity and legal continuity across state lines, ensuring that legal decisions or documents like marriages, driver's licenses, and court judgments are acknowledged and upheld by all states, facilitating interstate cooperation and legal consistency.

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  • 3. 

    What is the name for governmental authority shared jointly by national and state governments, such as the power to tax residents?

    • A.

      Joint powers

    • B.

      Concurrent powers

    • C.

      Parallel powers

    • D.

      Fusion of powers

    Correct Answer
    B. Concurrent powers
    Explanation
    Concurrent powers refer to the political powers that are independently exercisable by both federal and state governments under the Constitution. These powers include taxing, building roads, and establishing judiciary systems. The concept of concurrent powers allows for a flexible, multi-layered approach to governance, where both levels of government can operate effectively in the same spheres of influence, ensuring efficiency and adaptability in public administration.

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  • 4. 

    National government funding provided to state/local governments accompanied by specific instructions about how the funds may be used, are:

    • A.

      Block grants

    • B.

      Grants-in-aid

    • C.

      Devolution

    • D.

      Specific funding accounts.

    Correct Answer
    A. Block grants
    Explanation
    Grants-in-aid are financial aids provided by the federal government to state or local governments for specific projects or programs. These funds come with stipulated requirements or conditions that the recipients must meet to use the money, typically aimed at achieving national objectives in local projects, such as highway construction, education reform, or healthcare improvements. This mechanism allows the federal government to influence local governance in important policy areas while providing necessary funding.

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  • 5. 

    Transferring authority from national to state or local government levels is called:

    • A.

      Devolution

    • B.

      Nullification

    • C.

      Concurrent powers

    • D.

      Joint powers.

    Correct Answer
    A. Devolution
    Explanation
    Devolution represents the process by which certain powers and responsibilities are transferred from the federal level of government down to state or local levels. This decentralization strategy is often pursued to enhance governmental efficiency, increase political participation at the local level, and make government more responsive to regional needs and conditions. It can lead to more tailored, localized governance, allowing states and municipalities to address their unique issues more directly.

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  • 6. 

    What is the term for obligation imposed on state or local government officials by federal legislation, without sufficient federal funding to cover the costs?

    • A.

      Credit claiming

    • B.

      Unfunded mandate

    • C.

      Gridlock

    • D.

      Categorical grants

    Correct Answer
    B. Unfunded mandate
    Explanation
    An unfunded mandate occurs when the federal government requires state or local governments to implement certain policies or regulatory measures without providing adequate funding to cover the associated costs. These mandates can place significant financial strain on state and local budgets, as they must find ways to meet these federal requirements without the corresponding financial support, often leading to budget reallocations or increased state and local taxes.

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  • 7. 

    A national polity governed as a single unit, with the central government exercising all or most political authority, is known as a:

    • A.

      Unitary government

    • B.

      Confederation

    • C.

      Federal government

    • D.

      Communist government

    Correct Answer
    A. Unitary government
    Explanation
    A unitary government is a form of government where a single central authority holds the power, and any administrative divisions (sub-national units) only have powers that the central government chooses to delegate. This is the most common form of government worldwide and contrasts sharply with a federal system where sovereignty is constitutionally divided between the central governing authority and constituent political units.

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  • 8. 

    A group of independent states or nations that yield some of their powers to a national government, although each state retains a degree of sovereign authority, is known as a:

    • A.

      Unitary government

    • B.

      Confederation

    • C.

      Federal government

    • D.

      Communist government.

    Correct Answer
    B. Confederation
    Explanation
    A confederation is a union of sovereign states, united for purposes of common action often in relation to foreign affairs or defense. In a confederation, the central authority is typically weak, and the component states retain a major portion of their political autonomy, as well as their sovereignty, often retaining the right to secede. The European Union is a modern example of a confederation in certain respects.

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  • 9. 

    National government powers set out explicitly in the Constitution are known as:

    • A.

      Granted powers

    • B.

      Concurrent powers

    • C.

      Reserved powers

    • D.

      National powers.

    Correct Answer
    A. Granted powers
    Explanation
    Granted powers, also known as enumerated or expressed powers, are those specifically listed in the Constitution as being conferred to the federal government. These include the power to regulate interstate commerce, to declare war, to levy taxes, and to spend for the general welfare, thereby providing a framework for federal activities and limitations.

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  • 10. 

    The constitutional declaration (in Article 6, Section 2) that the national government's authority prevails over any conflicting state or local government claims is called:

    • A.

      Granted powers

    • B.

      Concurrent powers

    • C.

      Reserved powers

    • D.

      The supremacy clause.

    Correct Answer
    D. The supremacy clause.
    Explanation
    The Supremacy Clause, embedded in Article VI, Section 2 of the Constitution, establishes that the federal Constitution, and federal law generally, take precedence over state laws, and even state constitutions. It is a crucial principle that helps maintain the hierarchy of law throughout the United States, ensuring that federal law is the "supreme law of the land," and resolves conflicts between state and federal laws in favor of the latter.

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  • Current Version
  • May 01, 2024
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Sep 16, 2015
    Quiz Created by
    Jamessteve
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