Analyzing Texts: A New Criticism Quiz

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Analyzing Texts: A New Criticism Quiz - Quiz

Welcome to the "Analyzing Texts: A New Criticism Quiz," where we embark on a literary journey delving into the profound realm of New Criticism. This movement, dominating mid-20th-century American literary criticism, revolutionized how we approach and interpret literature. In this quiz, you'll explore the core tenets of New Criticism, the influential figures who shaped it, and the key concepts that define this approach. Each question unravels layers of literary analysis that challenge conventional perspectives.

Prepare to navigate through the literary landscape, unraveling the significance of self-contained aesthetic objects. Whether you're a seasoned literature enthusiast or a newcomer eager to explore critical Read moretheory, this quiz offers a stimulating experience in understanding how New Criticism transformed the way we engage with texts. Let the questions transport you to the mid-20th century, where critics sought to unveil the complexities within literary works, fostering a deeper appreciation for the art of writing. Embrace the challenge and see if you can master the principles of New Criticism!


New Criticism Questions and Answers

  • 1. 

    What is New Criticism?

    • A.

      A historical approach to literature

    • B.

      A comparative study of foreign languages

    • C.

      An empirical scientific approach

    • D.

      A formalist movement in literary theory

    Correct Answer
    D. A formalist movement in literary theory
    Explanation
    New Criticism, a formalist movement, dominated American literary criticism in the mid-20th century. Emphasizing close reading, particularly of poetry, it aimed to unveil a work's self-contained aesthetic objectivity. The movement's name originated from John Crowe Ransom's book, "The New Criticism," outlining its principles of analysis and interpretation.

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  • 2. 

    Who wrote the book "The New Criticism," after which the movement derived its name?

    • A.

      T.S. Eliot

    • B.

      I. A. Richards

    • C.

      Cleanth Brooks

    • D.

      John Crowe Ransom

    Correct Answer
    D. John Crowe Ransom
    Explanation
    The movement derived its name from John Crowe Ransom's book "The New Criticism." Ransom, a key figure, contributed to the movement's foundational principles. The book outlined New Criticism's emphasis on close reading, self-referentiality, and self-containment in literature, making it a seminal work in the development of the movement.

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  • 3. 

    Which Cambridge scholar's works, including "Practical Criticism," were important to New Criticism?

    • A.

      T.S. Eliot

    • B.

      William Empson

    • C.

      I. A. Richards

    • D.

      John Crowe Ransom

    Correct Answer
    C. I. A. Richards
    Explanation
    I. A. Richards, a Cambridge scholar, played a crucial role in New Criticism's development. His works, especially "Practical Criticism," laid the groundwork for empirical scientific approaches to literary analysis. Richards' focus on language and form contributed significantly to the formation of New Critical methodology, influencing subsequent figures like Cleanth Brooks and W. K. Wimsatt.

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  • 4. 

    Who among the following gave the idea of intentional and affective fallacy?

    • A.

      T.S. Eliot

    • B.

      W. K. Wimsatt

    • C.

      Cleanth Brooks

    • D.

      John Crowe Ransom

    Correct Answer
    B. W. K. Wimsatt
    Explanation
    W. K. Wimsatt introduced the idea of intentional and affective fallacy. Wimsatt's emphasis on the work's inherent qualities and autonomy from the author's subjective elements became a foundational aspect of New Criticism.

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  • 5. 

    Which critical essays of T.S. Eliot greatly influenced the formation of New Criticism?

    • A.

      "The Wasteland" and "Prufrock"

    • B.

      "Tradition and the Individual Talent" and "Hamlet and His Problems"

    • C.

      "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" and "The Waste Land"

    • D.

      "The Canonization" and "The Well Wrought Urn"

    Correct Answer
    B. "Tradition and the Individual Talent" and "Hamlet and His Problems"
    Explanation
    T.S. Eliot's essays, especially "Tradition and the Individual Talent" and "Hamlet and His Problems," shaped New Criticism. These essays introduced key concepts like the "theory of impersonality" and "objective correlative," influencing the movement's canon and providing a theoretical basis for the critical analysis of literature.

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  • 6. 

    Which of the following New Critics were the students of John Crowe Ransom, an important inspiration for the New Criticism movement?

    • A.

      T.S. Eliot, W. K. Wimsatt, and I. A. Richards

    • B.

      Allen Tate, Cleanth Brooks, and Robert Penn Warren

    • C.

      William Empson, Monroe Beardsley, and John Dewey

    • D.

      T.S. Eliot, William Empson, and I. A. Richards

    Correct Answer
    B. Allen Tate, Cleanth Brooks, and Robert Penn Warren
    Explanation
    Allen Tate, Cleanth Brooks, and Robert Penn Warren, students of John Crowe Ransom, were instrumental in developing the aesthetics known as New Criticism. Ransom's teachings inspired these scholars, laying the groundwork for the movement. Their contributions, especially in understanding the autonomy of literary works, shaped the core principles of New Criticism.

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  • 7. 

    How did T.S. Eliot's evaluative judgments influence the formation of New Criticism?

    • A.

      Condemning Romantic poets like Keats and Shelley

    • B.

      Liking for Victorian poets like Tennyson

    • C.

      Condemning Classical poets like Homer and Virgil

    • D.

      Liking for Renaissance poets like Shakespeare

    Correct Answer
    A. Condemning Romantic poets like Keats and Shelley
    Explanation
    Eliot's evaluative judgments, such as his condemnation of Romantic poets like Keats and Shelley, greatly influenced the formation of the New Critical canon. Eliot favored the so-called metaphysical poets and insisted on poetry's impersonality, laying the groundwork for New Criticism's emphasis on objective analysis, self-contained aesthetic objects, and a departure from subjective interpretations based on authorial intent or personal emotions.

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  • 8. 

    Which essay by William K. Wimsatt and Monroe Beardsley argued against an author's intention?

    • A.

      "The Intentional Fallacy"

    • B.

      "Close Reading and Criticism"

    • C.

      "The Authorial Dilemma"

    • D.

      "Analyzing Literary Intent"

    Correct Answer
    A. "The Intentional Fallacy"
    Explanation
    William K. Wimsatt and Monroe Beardsley challenged the relevance of an author's intention in "The Intentional Fallacy" (1946). The essay argued that analyzing literary works based on the author's intended meaning is erroneous, emphasizing the importance of focusing on the text's inherent qualities for a more objective and effective critical analysis.

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  • 9. 

    During which decades was the hey-day of the New Criticism in American high schools and colleges?

    • A.

      1920s and 1930s

    • B.

      1940s and 1950s

    • C.

      1950s and 1960s

    • D.

      1960s and 1970s

    Correct Answer
    B. 1940s and 1950s
    Explanation
    The hey-day of the New Criticism in American high schools and colleges spanned from the 1940s to the mid-1970s. The movement gained prominence during the Cold War decades, with works like Brooks and Warren's "Understanding Poetry" and "Understanding Fiction" becoming foundational texts in literature education during this period.

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  • 10. 

    In which year did William Empson publish his seminal text "Seven Types of Ambiguity"?

    • A.

      1920

    • B.

      1925

    • C.

      1930

    • D.

      1935

    Correct Answer
    C. 1930
    Explanation
    William Empson published "Seven Types of Ambiguity" in 1930. It was a groundbreaking work that marked the inception of New Criticism. The book became a key foundation for the movement, influencing subsequent New Critics and contributing to the development of a more nuanced and structured approach to literary analysis.

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  • 11. 

    In the practice of literary studies, when did the technique of close reading emerge in Britain?

    • A.

      1920s

    • B.

      1930s

    • C.

      1940s

    • D.

      1950s

    Correct Answer
    A. 1920s
    Explanation
    The technique of close reading emerged in 1920s Britain. Pioneered by I. A. Richards, William Empson, and T.S. Eliot, it sought to replace an "impressionistic" view of literature with "practical criticism." American New Critics in the 1930s and 1940s similarly anchored their views in this method, promoting close reading as essential to understanding a work's autonomy and significance.

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  • 12. 

    What does "Seven Types of Ambiguity" by William Empson organize around?

    • A.

      Types of ambiguity in novels

    • B.

      Types of ambiguity in literary genres

    • C.

      Types of ambiguity in poetry

    • D.

      Types of narrative techniques

    Correct Answer
    C. Types of ambiguity in poetry
    Explanation
    "Seven Types of Ambiguity" by William Empson organizes around seven types of ambiguity found in the poetry he discusses. These types delve into the intricate nuances and layers of meaning within poetic language, providing readers and critics with a structured framework for understanding and appreciating the complexity inherent in literary works.

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  • 13. 

    What is the title of Cleanth Brooks' seminal text in the New Critical school of literary criticism?

    • A.

      "The Canonization"

    • B.

      "The Waste Land"

    • C.

      "The Well Wrought Urn"

    • D.

      "Understanding Poetry"

    Correct Answer
    C. "The Well Wrought Urn"
    Explanation
    Cleanth Brooks' seminal text in the New Critical school is "The Well Wrought Urn." This work, divided into eleven chapters, engages in close readings of celebrated English poems. Brooks' exploration of poetry, particularly in the context of "The Well Wrought Urn," emphasizes the importance of understanding the aesthetic qualities and self-contained nature of literary works for effective literary analysis.

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  • 14. 

    According to Brooks, what is considered "heresy" when trying to get at the meaning of a poem?

    • A.

      Paraphrasing a poem

    • B.

      Ignoring historical context

    • C.

      Analyzing meter and rhyme scheme

    • D.

      Disregarding the author's biography

    Correct Answer
    A. Paraphrasing a poem
    Explanation
    Cleanth Brooks argues that paraphrasing a poem is considered "heresy" when attempting to understand its meaning. He contends that reducing a poem to a simple paraphrase oversimplifies its complexity and undermines the nuanced interplay of language and form, advocating for a more detailed and close examination to appreciate the richness of the poetic experience.

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  • 15. 

    What key concept did T.S. Eliot introduce in his essay "Tradition and the Individual Talent"?

    • A.

      The theory of impersonality

    • B.

      The intentional fallacy

    • C.

      The objective correlative

    • D.

      The hermeneutic circle

    Correct Answer
    A. The theory of impersonality
    Explanation
    T.S. Eliot introduced the concept of the "theory of impersonality" in his essay "Tradition and the Individual Talent." This idea emphasized the poet's need to transcend personal emotions and experiences, connecting with a broader cultural and historical tradition. The theory underscored the objective and universal qualities of poetry, influencing the New Critical canon and reinforcing the movement's commitment to self-contained aesthetic objects.

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  • Current Version
  • Nov 19, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Nov 17, 2023
    Quiz Created by
    Sophia Smith
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