Organizational Behaviour Chapter 1

31 Questions  I  By Krista_500 on February 4, 2011

  
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1.  The knowledge, skills, and abilities that employees carry around in their heads. Important part of a company's stock of knowledge. The knowledge makes the company effective.
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2.  The study of what people think, feel, and do in and around organizations.
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3.  Individuals, organizations, or other entities who affect or are affected by the organization's objectives and actions. Personalizes the open systems perspective. Identifies specific people and social entities in the external and internal environment. Recognizes that these types of relations are dynamic.
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4.  The idea that the field should develop from knowledge in other disciplines, not just from its own isolated research base.
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5.  The distribution of knowledge throughout the organization.
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6.  A perspective that organizational effectiveness depends on the organization's capacity to acquire, share, use, and store valuable knowledge.
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7.  A perspective that organizations take their sustenance from the environment and, in turn, affect that environment through their output.
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8.  A broad concept represented by several perspectives, including the organization's fit with external environment, internal subsystems are configured for a high-performance workplace, when companies are learning organizations, and when companies satisfy the needs of key stakeholders.
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9.  Relatively stable, evaluative beliefs that guide a person's preferences for outcomes or courses of action in a variety of situations.
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10.  When information is brought into the organization from the external environment.
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11.  The degree to which a person minimizes conflict between work and nonwork demands.
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12.  Goal-directed behaviours under the individual's control that support organizational obectives.
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13.  The amount of outputs relative to inputs in the organization's transformation process.
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14.  Organizational activities intended to benefit society and the environment beyond the firm's immediate financial interests or legal obligations. The view that companies have a contract with society. Adopts the triple bottom line aimed to survive and be profitable in the marketplace (economic), maintaining or improving conditions for society (social), and environmental spheres of sustainability (physical environment).
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15.  The study of moral principles or values that determine whether outcomes are right or wrong and good or bad.
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16.  We can't rey on a particular concept or practice having the same results in every situation. We need to understand and diagnose the situation and select the strategy most appropriate under those conditions.
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17.  The value derived from an organization's rapport with customer's, suppliers, and others.
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18.  Difference in the psychological characteristics of employees, including personalities, beliefs, values, and attitudes.
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19.  The knowledge captured and retained in an organization's structures, such as the documentation of work procedures and physical layout of the production line.
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20.  Economic, social, and cultural connectivity with people in other parts of the world. Responsible for increasing work intensification.
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21.  The storage and preservation of human capital. Includes information that employees possess as well as knowledge embedded in the organization's systems and structures. Transfers knowledge to other emloyees and also transfers knowledge into structural capital.
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22.  Observable demographic and other covert differences in people, such as their race, ethnicity, gender, age, and physical abilities.
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23.  Voluntary behaviours that have the potential to directly or indirectly harm the organization.
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24.  The result is evidence-based management. Leaders and other decision makers are bombarded with so many ideas. OB research is rarely described in the context of a specific problem in a specific organization. Managers therefore have the difficult task of figuring out which theories are relevant to their unique situation. Some management concepts have become popular because of heavy marketing, not because of any evidence that they are valid. People form perceptions and beliefs quickly and tend to ignore evidence that their beliefs are inaccurate.
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25.  Three levels: individual, team, and organization. Although an organizational behaviour topic is typically pegged into one level, it usually relates to multiple levels.
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26.  The company's stock of knowledge, including human capital, structural capital, and relationship capital.
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27.  Work performed away from the traditional physical workplace using information technology. The most common form is called telecommuting or telworking. Reduces employee stress by offering better work/life balance and dramatically reducing time lost through commuting to the office.
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28.  Various forms of cooperation and helpfulness to others that support the organization's social and psychological context. Companies require contextual performance along with task performance.
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29.  Removes knowledge that no longer adds value to the organization.
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30.  Groups of people who work interdependently toward some purpose. Employees have structured patterns of interaction, complete certain tasks in a coordinated way, and have a sense of purpose.
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31.  A perspective that effective organizations incorporate several workplace practices that leverage the potential of human capital. Human capital helps the organization realize opportunities or minimize threats in the external environment. The two most widely mentioned forms are employee involvement and job autonomy. Another key variable is employee competence. Various forms of financial and nonfinancial rewards are valued by employees.
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