Basic Wine Knowledge: Trivia Facts Quiz!

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Basic Wine Knowledge: Trivia Facts Quiz! - Quiz


Are you a wine enthusiast with a thirst for knowledge? Wine, the exquisite alcoholic beverage crafted from fermented grape juice, holds a rich history and a diverse range of flavors. While other fruits like apples, cranberries, and plums can be used to make wine, grapes remain the classic choice for connoisseurs. If you yearn to deepen your understanding of this ancient elixir, our quiz is the perfect challenge.

Put your wine knowledge to the test as you navigate through a series of intriguing questions that explore regions, grape varieties, and wine-making techniques. Uncork your curiosity and embark on this captivating Read morequiz to reveal the extent of your wine expertise!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    How does red wine get its color?

    • A.

      Artificial coloring

    • B.

      Contact with grape skins during fermentation

    • C.

      Crushing the grapes

    • D.

      Reaction from contact with the type of yeast

    Correct Answer
    B. Contact with grape skins during fermentation
    Explanation
    Red wine comes from the use of red (all dark-colored) grapes. During the fermentation process, the grape juice remains in contact with the skins for a period of a couple of weeks, giving the red wine its color. If the skins are removed immediately after the crash, the resulting wine from the red grapes will actually be white or light pink.

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  • 2. 

    White wine comes from which grapes?

    • A.

      White grapes

    • B.

      Red grapes

    • C.

      Both white and red grapes

    Correct Answer
    C. Both white and red grapes
    Explanation
    While the majority of white wine comes from white grapes, white wine can also be made from red grapes if the skins are removed immediately after the crash.

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  • 3. 

    How do rose wines obtain their pink color?

    • A.

      Contact with skins for a short period of time

    • B.

      Blending of a finished red and white wine

    • C.

      Addition of water to a finished red wine

    • D.

      Both A and B

    Correct Answer
    D. Both A and B
    Explanation
    Most fine rose wines result from contact with red grape skins for a short (2-3 day) period of time during fermentation. This requires the winemaker to gauge the desired level of color and remove the skins at the precise moment he achieves the proper color. A much less stressful method used in bulk rose production is to blend a finished red wine with a finished white wine to obtain the proper color level.

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  • 4. 

    How does sparkling wine get its bubbles?

    • A.

      Carbonation

    • B.

      Secondary fermentation in the bottle

    • C.

      Secondary fermentation in a sealed tank

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    While the finest champagnes all result from a secondary fermentation occurring in the bottle, this is also the most labor-intensive (and therefore expensive) method. Other methods include secondary fermentation in a closed tank or simple carbonation (which results in large, flabby, short-lasting bubbles).

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  • 5. 

    Most wines are at their best if stored in a cellar for at least 10 years.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    While hearing about a 1980 Chateau Margaux sounds exotic, the truth is that most wines are created with the intent to be consumed within a short period of time, especially among white and sparkling wines.

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  • 6. 

    How should wine be stored?

    • A.

      In a cool, dark location

    • B.

      In a warm, bright location to prevent mold

    • C.

      Near vibrations (stairs, elevator) to prevent sediment build up

    Correct Answer
    A. In a cool, dark location
    Explanation
    Wine is best stored in a cool, dark location away from vibrations. Sunlight and heat can "cook" a wine.

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  • 7. 

    A wine that smells musty or of wet cardboard, when opened, is a sign of

    • A.

      Oxidation

    • B.

      A good Merlot

    • C.

      Long growing season

    • D.

      Cork taint

    Correct Answer
    D. Cork taint
    Explanation
    Cork taint is a result of contact with a flawed cork. This occurs in 1% to 7% of all wines depending upon your source. Cork taint is undetectable until the wine is opened. It occurs in all quality levels and price ranges of wines. A wine suffering from cork taint is referred to as "corked" and should be discarded.

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  • 8. 

    Why are wines traditionally stored on their side?

    • A.

      Provides easy access to all wines in a rack

    • B.

      Keeps the cork moist

    • C.

      Result of influential cabinet makers in the 12th century

    • D.

      Less likely to fall in case of an earthquake

    Correct Answer
    B. Keeps the cork moist
    Explanation
    If a bottle of wine with a cork is stored upright, the cork will dry out, allowing oxygen to enter the bottle. This will result in the oxidation of the wine, turning the wine (both red and white) browner in color, tasting stale, and giving undesirable flavors.

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  • 9. 

    What are tannins?

    • A.

      Compounds in red wine added by grape skins, seeds, stems, and contact with oak

    • B.

      The technical description for a "leathery" taste in wine

    • C.

      Synthetic corks

    • D.

      How the wine clings to the side of a glass, also referred to as "legs"

    Correct Answer
    A. Compounds in red wine added by grape skins, seeds, stems, and contact with oak
    Explanation
    Red wines will have varying amounts of tannin levels depending on the grape used and the winemaking process. Tannins add astringency (dryness) and bitterness. Wines high in tannins will have the tannins "soften" or "mellow" with age.

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  • 10. 

    Wine aroma refers to

    • A.

      The overall intensity of the wine

    • B.

      Only non-fruit scents

    • C.

      The detection of a single recognizable scent, such as blackberries or vanilla

    Correct Answer
    C. The detection of a single recognizable scent, such as blackberries or vanilla
    Explanation
    Wine enthusiasts are renowned for their ability to detect what sounds like odd or absurd aromas in a wine, from gooseberry to tobacco to pencil shavings. Beginning wine tasters should concentrate on broader characteristics such as "citrus fruit" or "minerals". The collection of all aromas is referred to as the wine's "bouquet".

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  • 11. 

    Red wines from the Bordeaux region are

    • A.

      Full-bodied wines made from Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc

    • B.

      Full-bodied wines made from Syrah, Grenache, and Mourvedre

    • C.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Pinot Noir

    • D.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Sangiovese

    • E.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Tempranillo

    Correct Answer
    A. Full-bodied wines made from Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc
    Explanation
    Bordeaux is located in southwest France, where the Garonne River meets the Atlantic Ocean. Regions on the left bank (south of the river) tend to have a higher percentage of Cabernet Sauvignon, while regions on the right bank (north of the river) use Merlot as the predominant grape.

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  • 12. 

    Red wines from the Burgundy region are

    • A.

      Full-bodied wines made from Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc

    • B.

      Full-bodied wines made from Syrah, Grenache, and Mourvedre

    • C.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Pinot Noir

    • D.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Sangiovese

    • E.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Tempranillo

    Correct Answer
    C. Medium-bodied wines made from Pinot Noir
    Explanation
    Burgundy lies in eastern France along the Soane river. It is the world's most famous region for exceptional red wines made from Pinot Noir.

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  • 13. 

    Red wines from the Cotes du Rhone region are

    • A.

      Full-bodied wines made from Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc

    • B.

      Full-bodied wines made from Syrah, Grenache, and Mourvedre

    • C.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Pinot Noir

    • D.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Sangiovese

    • E.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Tempranillo

    Correct Answer
    B. Full-bodied wines made from Syrah, Grenache, and Mourvedre
    Explanation
    The Rhone valley lies in southeastern France where the Rhone river meets the Mediterranean sea. Wines in the Northern Rhone tend to be made with a high percentage of Syrah while the wines in the south use a higher amount of Grenache along with Syrah and Mourvedre.

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  • 14. 

    Red wines from the Chianti region are

    • A.

      Full-bodied wines made from Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc

    • B.

      Full-bodied wines made from Syrah, Grenache, and Mourvedre

    • C.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Pinot Noir

    • D.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Sangiovese

    • E.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Tempranillo

    Correct Answer
    D. Medium-bodied wines made from Sangiovese
    Explanation
    The Chianti region lies within Tuscany in western Italy. Laws dictate that the grape Sangiovese must be used in order for the wine to be called a "Chianti". Pioneering winemakers have experimented with blending Sangiovese with Cabernet Sauvignon and other grapes to make "Super Tuscan" wines.

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  • 15. 

    Red wines from the Rioja region are

    • A.

      Full-bodied wines made from Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc

    • B.

      Full-bodied wines made from Syrah, Grenache, and Mourvedre

    • C.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Pinot Noir

    • D.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Sangiovese

    • E.

      Medium-bodied wines made from Tempranillo

    Correct Answer
    E. Medium-bodied wines made from Tempranillo
    Explanation
    Rioja lies in Northern Spain along the Ebro river.

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  • 16. 

    As a general rule, red wines in order of lightest to darkest are:

    • A.

      Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir

    • B.

      Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot

    • C.

      Merlot, Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon

    • D.

      Pinot Noir, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon

    Correct Answer
    D. Pinot Noir, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon
    Explanation
    While winemakers can certainly manipulate the final wine, generally speaking, Pinot Noir wines tend to be lightest and lowest in tannins while Cabernet Sauvignon is the boldest and most tannic. Merlot is usually right in the middle.

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  • 17. 

    Which red wine is usually served slightly chilled?

    • A.

      Cabernet Sauvignon

    • B.

      Malbec

    • C.

      Beaujolais-Nouveau

    • D.

      Shiraz

    Correct Answer
    C. Beaujolais-Nouveau
    Explanation
    Beaujolais-Nouveau is produced from the Gamay grape and comes from the Beaujolais region in Eastern France (just south of Burgundy). This light red wine benefits from being slightly chilled and is best consumed very young.

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  • 18. 

    Syrah and Shiraz are the same grape varietal.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    While most of the word refers to the grape as Syrah, Australia refers to it as Shiraz. Two of the world's best regions for this grape are the Cotes du Rhone in southeastern France and the Barossa Valley in South Australia.

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  • 19. 

    Why is red wine typically paired with heavier meats such as beef?

    • A.

      The tannins help to break apart the meat while chewing.

    • B.

      A white wine would be overpowered by the strong flavors of the meat.

    • C.

      A red wine can balance well with the pronounced flavors of the meat.

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    Tannins can help soften and break down a chewy piece of meat. Dark red wines balance well with rich cuts of meat while lighter reds and nearly all whites would be overwhelmed by the flavors of the meat.

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  • 20. 

    What color of wine would you pair with a pasta dish?

    • A.

      A full bodied red

    • B.

      A crisp, high acid white

    • C.

      It depends on the sauce.

    • D.

      A heavily oaked Chardonnay

    Correct Answer
    C. It depends on the sauce.
    Explanation
    The pasta itself rarely is the deciding factor on which wine to use. It is the other components of the pasta dish (sauce, filling) that are the determining factor. A good rule of thumb is white sauce goes with white wine, while red sauce goes with red wine.

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  • 21. 

    Which white wine is typically light in the body, lower in alcohol, and frequently off-dry (slightly sweet)?

    • A.

      Chardonnay

    • B.

      Sauvignon Blanc

    • C.

      Riesling

    Correct Answer
    C. Riesling
    Explanation
    Riesling traditionally hails from Germany, although it also does well in Alsace, the Pacific Northwest, New York, and cooler regions in Australia and New Zealand. It is light-bodied, fruity, and tangy.

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  • 22. 

    Which white wine is typically medium in body, high in acidity, and rarely aged in oak?

    • A.

      Chardonnay

    • B.

      Sauvignon Blanc

    • C.

      Riesling

    Correct Answer
    B. Sauvignon Blanc
    Explanation
    Sauvignon Blanc is a very versatile white wine that pairs well with a wide variety of foods. Its most famous regions are New Zealand, France (Loire Valley and Bordeaux), and California.

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  • 23. 

    Which white wine is typically full in body, frequently oaked, and known for its rich, buttery flavor?

    • A.

      Chardonnay

    • B.

      Sauvignon Blanc

    • C.

      Riesling

    Correct Answer
    A. Chardonnay
    Explanation
    Chardonnay is the world's most popular wine. While most of us know it for the heavy oak and butter flavors, neither of these flavors actually come from the grape, but from winemaking techniques frequently applied to this particular grape.

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Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Jul 18, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Feb 16, 2011
    Quiz Created by
    Bacchusmike

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