Urinary Tract Obstruction Questions! Trivia Quiz

51 Questions | Total Attempts: 50

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Urinary Tract Obstruction Questions! Trivia Quiz

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The blockage of the flow of urine at any point in the urinary tract from the collecting ducts in the kidney to the urethra meatus.
    • A. 

      Hydronephrosis

    • B. 

      Urinary tract obstruction

    • C. 

      Urinary tract infection

    • D. 

      Urinary calculi

  • 2. 
    Distention of the renal pelvis and calyces with urine.
    • A. 

      Hydronephrosis

    • B. 

      Urinary tract obstruction

    • C. 

      Urinary tract infection

    • D. 

      Urinary calculi

  • 3. 
    Obstruction of the urinary tract leads to increased risk of UTI's, hydrohypnosis, and kidney damage.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 4. 
    What are the four processes of crystallization that can cause urinary calculi's?
    • A. 

      Supersaturation, matrix formation, lack of specific protective agents that affect the crystallization of stone-forming salts, any combination of the others

    • B. 

      Hyper saturation, matrix formation, lack of specific protective agents that affect the crystallization of stone-forming salts, any combination of the others

    • C. 

      Hyper saturation, pyramid formation, lack of specific protective agents that affect the crystallization of stone-forming salts, any combination of the others

    • D. 

      Supersaturation, pyramid formation, lack of specific protective agents that affect the crystallization of stone-forming salts, any combination of the others

  • 5. 
    What is supersaturation?
    • A. 

      Initiated by the binding of mucoproteins to form the mass of stone.

    • B. 

      Excess solute in the urine due to decreased fluid intake or insolubility.

    • C. 

      Lack of specific protective agents that affect the crystallization of stone-forming salts.

    • D. 

      Any combination of the above.

  • 6. 
    What is matrix formation?
    • A. 

      Initiated by the binding of mucoproteins to form the mass of a stone.

    • B. 

      Excess solute in the urine due to decreased fluid intake or insolubility.

    • C. 

      Lack of specific protective agents that affect the crystallization of stone-forming salts.

    • D. 

      Any combination of the above.

  • 7. 
    Often seen in children. Caused by the renal tubules' inability to absorb the amino acid cysteine.
    • A. 

      Xanthine

    • B. 

      Struvite

    • C. 

      Cystine

    • D. 

      Uric acid

    • E. 

      Calcium

  • 8. 
    Caused by a rare inherited condition which causes excessive excretion of the enzyme xanthine. Often confused with uric acid stone because both are radiolucent.
    • A. 

      Xanthine

    • B. 

      Struvite

    • C. 

      Cystine

    • D. 

      Uric acid

    • E. 

      Calcium

  • 9. 
    Which type of urinary calculi is the only stone to be truly radiolucent?
    • A. 

      Xanthine

    • B. 

      Struvite

    • C. 

      Cystine

    • D. 

      Uric acid

    • E. 

      Calcium

  • 10. 
    Formed when excess concentrated urine. Often associated with gout, lymphoma, and leukemia. Only stone to be truly radiolucent.
    • A. 

      Xanthine

    • B. 

      Struvite

    • C. 

      Cystine

    • D. 

      Uric acid

    • E. 

      Calcium

  • 11. 
    15% of all stones. Present in patients with alkali urine and urinary tract infections caused by the Proteus bacteria. Difficult to treat with antibiotics; surgery is a common treatment.
    • A. 

      Xanthine

    • B. 

      Struvite

    • C. 

      Cystine

    • D. 

      Uric acid

    • E. 

      Calcium

  • 12. 
    80-85 percent of urinary stones consist of this. Most commonly due to an elevated urinary calcium.
    • A. 

      Xanthine

    • B. 

      Struvite

    • C. 

      Cystine

    • D. 

      Uric acid

    • E. 

      Calcium

  • 13. 
    What bacteria can cause urinary tract infections associated with struvite?
    • A. 

      Protozoa

    • B. 

      Proteus

    • C. 

      Panthius

    • D. 

      Pratenz

  • 14. 
    A blind pouch within the muscle wall of the bladder or urethra. Urine is trapped in the pouch, which expands and block urine outflow from the bladder. The trapped urine then stagnates and becomes a potential site for infection.
    • A. 

      Benign prostatic hyperplasia

    • B. 

      Urinary diverticula

    • C. 

      Strictures

    • D. 

      Urinal pocket

  • 15. 
    A benign enlargement of the prostate gland. The prostate gradually grows  in size thus narrowing the urethral lumen. The bladder then has to contract with more force and duration to push urine through the narrow lumen.
    • A. 

      Benign prostatic hyperplasia

    • B. 

      Urinary diverticula

    • C. 

      Strictures

    • D. 

      Urinal pocket

  • 16. 
    Abnormal narrowing of the urethra or ureter. Injury to the urethra leads to the formation of collagen and scar tissue to the injury site. This tissue narrows the urethra and reduces its elasticity.
    • A. 

      Benign prostatic hyperplasia

    • B. 

      Urinary diverticula

    • C. 

      Strictures

    • D. 

      Urinal pocket

  • 17. 
    Urinary diverticula is commonly found in
    • A. 

      Males

    • B. 

      Females

  • 18. 
    What age group is Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) usually seen in?
    • A. 

      Young boys

    • B. 

      Men in their thirties

    • C. 

      Infants

    • D. 

      Aging men

  • 19. 
    Approximately what percent of men over the age of 50 will have symptoms of Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)?
    • A. 

      60%

    • B. 

      80%

    • C. 

      45%

    • D. 

      75%

  • 20. 
    Who may have a slightly higher occurence rate of BPH?
    • A. 

      Caucasians

    • B. 

      Asians

    • C. 

      African Americans

  • 21. 
    What group may have a slightly lower rate of BPH
    • A. 

      Caucasians

    • B. 

      Asians

    • C. 

      African Americans

  • 22. 
    Due to the greater length of the female urethra, females get strictures more often than males.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 23. 
    What are some reasons females might get strictures?More than one answer
    • A. 

      Hormones

    • B. 

      Intercourse

    • C. 

      Childbirth

    • D. 

      C-sections

    • E. 

      Vaginal surgery

  • 24. 
    Strictures may occur due to congenital malformation or stenosis.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 25. 
    Strictures may also occur because of manipulation of the upper urinary tract during procedures, transurethral surgery, pelvic trauma or having a long-term indwelling urethral catheter.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 26. 
    The union of the ureter and the pelvis of the kidney. This narrow junction occurs as close to a right angle to the kidney. Because of this narrowing, this area is prone to obstruction
    • A. 

      Ureterovesical Junction

    • B. 

      Ureteroiliac Junction

    • C. 

      Ureteropelvic Junction

  • 27. 
    This is the portion of the ureter near the sacroiliac junction
    • A. 

      Ureterovesical Junction

    • B. 

      Ureteroiliac junction

    • C. 

      Ureteropelvic Junction

  • 28. 
    This is created by the union of the distal ureter and the bladder wall. It is a one-way door allowing urine to flow into the bladder and preventing reflux into the kidney.
    • A. 

      Ureterovesical Junction

    • B. 

      Ureteroiliac Junction

    • C. 

      Ureteropelvic Junction

  • 29. 
    Ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction may be the result of inflammation, ischemia, tumors, fibrosis, or Calculi
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 30. 
    What units are the ureterovesical junction (UVJ) composed of?More than one answer
    • A. 

      Introvesical (distal) ureter

    • B. 

      Trigone

    • C. 

      Renal pelvis

    • D. 

      The portion of the bladder wall nearest the kidney

    • E. 

      The portion of the bladder wall nearest the intravesical ureter

  • 31. 
    Flank and abdominal pain radiating to the genitals.
    • A. 

      Renal calculi

    • B. 

      Ureteral calculi

    • C. 

      Vesical calculi

  • 32. 
    Asymptomatic until passage through urethra; may cause dysuria and genital pain.
    • A. 

      Renal calculi

    • B. 

      Ureteral calculi

    • C. 

      Vesical calculi

  • 33. 
    Flank pain on the side of the affected kidney; may radiat into groin or genitals.
    • A. 

      Renal calculi

    • B. 

      Ureteral calculi

    • C. 

      Vesical calculi

  • 34. 
    What are the symptoms of urinary calculi?
    • A. 

      Nausea/vomiting; hematuria; paralytic ileus; fever; colic (kidney or ureteral), the muscles lining the urinary tract begin to spasm; elevated WBC

    • B. 

      History of chronic UTIs; discharge of pus from the urethra; Palpable perineal mass that empties when the perineum is compressed; discovery of false passage during difficult catheterization; development of urethral calculi; painful intercourse

    • C. 

      Voiding hesitancy; decreased force and quality of stream, feeling of incomplete bladder emptying; straining to urinate; dribbling after voiding; urgency; nocturia

    • D. 

      Prolonged voiding with thin, weak stream; voiding hesitancy; dysuria; frequency; nocturia; urgency; urge incontinence

  • 35. 
    What are the signs and symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)?
    • A. 

      Nausea/vomiting; hematuria; paralytic ileus; fever; colic (kidney or ureteral), the muscles lining the urinary tract begin to spasm; elevated WBC

    • B. 

      History of chronic UTIs; discharge of pus from the urethra; Palpable perineal mass that empties when the perineum is compressed; discovery of false passage during difficult catheterization; development of urethral calculi; painful intercourse

    • C. 

      Voiding hesitancy; decreased force and quality of stream, feeling of incomplete bladder emptying; straining to urinate; dribbling after voiding; urgency; nocturia

    • D. 

      Prolonged voiding with thin, weak stream; voiding hesitancy; dysuria; frequency; nocturia; urgency; urge incontinence

  • 36. 
    What are the signs and symptoms of strictures?
    • A. 

      Nausea/vomiting; hematuria; paralytic ileus; fever; colic (kidney or ureteral), the muscles lining the urinary tract begin to spasm; elevated WBC

    • B. 

      History of chronic UTIs; discharge of pus from the urethra; Palpable perineal mass that empties when the perineum is compressed; discovery of false passage during difficult catheterization; development of urethral calculi; painful intercourse

    • C. 

      Voiding hesitancy; decreased force and quality of stream, feeling of incomplete bladder emptying; straining to urinate; dribbling after voiding; urgency; nocturia

    • D. 

      Prolonged voiding with thin, weak stream; voiding hesitancy; dysuria; frequency; nocturia; urgency; urge incontinence

  • 37. 
    What are the signs and symptoms of urethral diverticula?
    • A. 

      Nausea/vomiting; hematuria; paralytic ileus; fever; colic (kidney or ureteral), the muscles lining the urinary tract begin to spasm; elevated WBC

    • B. 

      History of chronic UTIs; discharge of pus from the urethra; Palpable perineal mass that empties when the perineum is compressed; discovery of false passage during difficult catheterization; development of urethral calculi; painful intercourse

    • C. 

      Voiding hesitancy; decreased force and quality of stream, feeling of incomplete bladder emptying; straining to urinate; dribbling after voiding; urgency; nocturia

    • D. 

      Prolonged voiding with thin, weak stream; voiding hesitancy; dysuria; frequency; nocturia; urgency; urge incontinence

  • 38. 
    Radiologic tests:What are tests like transvaginal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used to test for?
    • A. 

      Urinary calculi

    • B. 

      BPH

    • C. 

      Urinary diverticola

    • D. 

      Strictures

  • 39. 
    Radiologic tests:What would a retrograde urethrogram (RUG) be used to test for?
    • A. 

      Urinary calculi

    • B. 

      BPH

    • C. 

      Urinary diverticola

    • D. 

      Strictures

  • 40. 
    Radiologic tests:What would  an IVP and a renal/prostatic ultrasound be used to test for?
    • A. 

      Urinary calculi

    • B. 

      BPH

    • C. 

      Urinary diverticola

    • D. 

      Strictures

  • 41. 
    Radiologic tests:What would a KUB and an IVP be used to test for?
    • A. 

      Urinary calculi

    • B. 

      BPH

    • C. 

      Urinary diverticula

    • D. 

      Strictures

  • 42. 
    What sort of laboratory tests would you run to test for BPH?
    • A. 

      Urethroscopy

    • B. 

      Urinalysis, urine culture, CBC, Prothrombin (PT), partial thromboplastin times (PTT)

    • C. 

      Urinalysis, Prostate screening for cancer (PSA)

    • D. 

      Urine culture

  • 43. 
    What sort of laboratory tests would you run to test for strictures?
    • A. 

      Urethroscopy

    • B. 

      Urinalysis, urine culture, CBC, Prothrombin (PT), partial thromboplastin times (PTT)

    • C. 

      Urinalysis, Prostate screening for cancer (PSA)

    • D. 

      Urine culture

  • 44. 
    What sort of laboratory tests would you run to test for urinary calculi?
    • A. 

      Urethroscopy

    • B. 

      Urinalysis, urine culture, CBC, Prothrombin (PT), partial thromboplastin times (PTT)

    • C. 

      Urinalysis, Prostate screening for cancer (PSA)

    • D. 

      Urine culture

  • 45. 
    What other tests might you run to test for urinary diverticola?
    • A. 

      Urethroscopy

    • B. 

      Cystourethroscopy, cystometry, pressure flow urodynamic studies, measurement of post-void urine

    • C. 

      Urinary flow rate, urethral catheterization, urethraloscopy, urethral calibration

    • D. 

      Urethral calibration

  • 46. 
    What other tests might you run to test for BPH?
    • A. 

      Urethroscopy

    • B. 

      Cystourethroscopy, cystometry, pressure-flow urodynamic studies, measurement of post-void urine.

    • C. 

      Urinary flow rate, urethral catheterization, urethraloscopy, urethral calibration

    • D. 

      Urethral calibration

  • 47. 
    What other tests might you run to test for strictures?
    • A. 

      Urethroscopy

    • B. 

      Cystourethroscopy, cystometry, pressure flow urodynamic studies, measurement of post-void urine

    • C. 

      Urinary flow rate, urethral catheterization, urethraloscopy, urethral calibration

    • D. 

      Urethral calibration

  • 48. 
    Urinary diverticula do not have any medical treatment available.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 49. 
    Urinary calculi medical intervention would entail using
    • A. 

      Extraterrestrial Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL)

    • B. 

      Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lythotherapy (ESWL)

    • C. 

      Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL)

    • D. 

      Extraterrestrial Shock Wave Lythotherapy (ESWL)

  • 50. 
    What increases contractility of the bladder?
    • A. 

      Alpha blockers

    • B. 

      Beta blockers

    • C. 

      Amino acid

    • D. 

      Ionized sulfur

  • 51. 
    Medicinal treatment for BPH includes
    • A. 

      Alpha blockers

    • B. 

      5Alpha-reductase inhibitors (AKA Proscar)

    • C. 

      Antiandrogen drugs

    • D. 

      Phytotherapy

    • E. 

      Beta blockers