Understanding Exposure, Chapter 2: Aperture

15 Questions | Total Attempts: 585

SettingsSettingsSettings
Aperture Quizzes & Trivia

This is a quiz for Chapter 2 of Bryan Peterson's book "Understanding Exposure".


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    When you change the aperture setting on your camera, what are you actually changing?
    • A. 

      How large of an opening the curtain makes on the camera

    • B. 

      How large of an opening the blades in the lens make

    • C. 

      The focus of the lens

    • D. 

      How fast light is recorded on your digital sensor or film

  • 2. 
    When you shoot using the lowest number possible for your aperture, what is it called?
    • A. 

      Shooting "slow"

    • B. 

      Shooting "low"

    • C. 

      Shooting "wide open"

    • D. 

      Shooting "small"

  • 3. 
    What is "depth of field"?
    • A. 

      Equal to your focal length

    • B. 

      The total distance from near to far that you are capturing in your photo

    • C. 

      How much of your photo from near to far is in sharp focus

    • D. 

      The measure of your foreground vs background as expressed by FG:BG

  • 4. 
    What determines your depth of field?
    • A. 

      Your aperture alone

    • B. 

      Aperture, focal length, and shutter speed

    • C. 

      Your aperture and the total distance between you and the subject you are focused on

    • D. 

      Your aperture, focal length, and the distance from your camera to the subject you are focusing on

  • 5. 
    Which aperture will give you more light?
    • A. 

      F/4

    • B. 

      F/16

  • 6. 
    Which aperture is more likely to give you a smoothly blurred background?
    • A. 

      F/4

    • B. 

      F/16

  • 7. 
    Which aperture will allow you to use a faster shutter speed?
    • A. 

      F/4

    • B. 

      F/16

  • 8. 
    You have a shot lined up and you want everything in focus from your shoes in the sand in the foreground to the sailboat way off in the distance.  You focus a third of the way into the frame, and set the aperture to f/20, but when you look through the viewfinder the sailboat looks blurry.  Why?
    • A. 

      Your aperture should be smaller, like f/4

    • B. 

      You should focus on the sailboat in the distance

    • C. 

      You should focus at infinity

    • D. 

      The viewfinder doesn't reflect your aperture settings, just take the photo and the sailboat will be sharp in the image

  • 9. 
    You're shooting a photo at f/11 and you decide to press the depth of field preview button to see what happens.  The viewfinder goes dark, although your depth of field looks ok.  What should you do?
    • A. 

      Expose for -1 to make the image brighter

    • B. 

      Expose for +1 to make the image brighter

    • C. 

      Increase the ISO or use f/4 instead

    • D. 

      Increase the ISO or use f/16 instead

    • E. 

      Do nothing, the image won't come out dark

  • 10. 
    If you have a scene where everything is at the same focus distance (like a person standing against a brick wall), what aperture is recommended?
    • A. 

      The smallest number possible like f/2

    • B. 

      F/8-f/11

    • C. 

      F/22 or higher

    • D. 

      The aperture wouldn't matter because there's no depth of field to worry about

  • 11. 
    Will f/4 give you the same depth of field in macro photography as it does in portraits?
    • A. 

      No, it'll be more shallow

    • B. 

      No, it'll be deeper

    • C. 

      Yes

    • D. 

      It's a trick question, small-numbered apertures like f/4 are not available when you focus close

  • 12. 
    Bright points of light in your scene are coming out as hexagons in your photo, you'd rather they come out as perfect circles.  What should you do?
    • A. 

      Use the lowest-numbered aperture possible (like f/2.8)

    • B. 

      Use the highest-numbered aperture possible (like f/22)

    • C. 

      Use f/8-f/11

    • D. 

      The hexagons are a result of your lens blade shape, there's nothing you can do

  • 13. 
    What aperture should you choose when you are really concerned about the sharpness of your subject.
    • A. 

      The lowest-numbered aperture possible, like f/2.8

    • B. 

      The highest-numbered aperture possible, like f/22

    • C. 

      F/8-f/11

    • D. 

      The quality of your lens determines sharpness, your aperture has nothing to do with it

  • 14. 
    What determines the apertures that are available to you?
    • A. 

      Your lens

    • B. 

      Your lens and the lighting conditions

    • C. 

      Your camera

    • D. 

      Your camera and the lighting conditions

  • 15. 
    A 50mm f/1.8 lens is considered "fast" -why is the term "fast" used to describe this lens?
    • A. 

      It focuses fast

    • B. 

      Low-numbered apertures capture moving subjects well

    • C. 

      Using small-numbered apertures results in faster shutter speeds

    • D. 

      The len's blades will open and close very quickly because it's a "prime" (not a "zoom" lens)

Related Topics
Back to Top Back to top