Cinematic Technique Terms Quiz

33 Questions | Total Attempts: 10196

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Cinematic Technique Terms Quiz

Movies have been how words are brought to life so that a play does not. They give us the true view of the world in which characters exist. If you wish to make a movie, you should understand cinematic techniques accurately, and which points give the desired view. Do you? Test yourself by taking the eye-opening test below.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    This angle illustrates the new found power that Peter Parker feels from his spider suit.
    • A. 

      High angle

    • B. 

      Low angle

    • C. 

      Eye level angle

    • D. 

      Dutch angle

  • 2. 
    This angle shoots the subject from above to create a feeling of powerlessness and/or weakness.
    • A. 

      High angle

    • B. 

      Low angle

    • C. 

      Eye level angle

    • D. 

      Dutch angle

  • 3. 
    This angle, also called a canted angle, adds tension to a frame and creates a sinister or distorted view of a character.
    • A. 

      High angle

    • B. 

      Low angle

    • C. 

      Eye level angle

    • D. 

      Dutch angle

  • 4. 
    This angle is the most natural and accounts for 90-95% of shots seen in films.
    • A. 

      High angle

    • B. 

      Low angle

    • C. 

      Eye level angle

    • D. 

      Dutch angle

  • 5. 
    This shot is the most natural; subjects are shot from the middle up
    • A. 

      Long shot

    • B. 

      Close up

    • C. 

      Establishing shot

    • D. 

      Medium shot

    • E. 

      Shot

  • 6. 
    The image being shot takes up at least 80 percent of the frame and therefore appears to be very large.
    • A. 

      Long shot

    • B. 

      Close up

    • C. 

      Medium shot

    • D. 

      Sequence

    • E. 

      Shot

  • 7. 
    A shot taken from some distance; shows the full subject and perhaps the surrounding scene as well, often causing the object on the screen to appear small.
    • A. 

      Long shot

    • B. 

      Close up

    • C. 

      Medium shot

    • D. 

      Sequence

    • E. 

      Shot

  • 8. 
    Sets the scene or shows the space of a scene; often a long shot
    • A. 

      Medium shot

    • B. 

      Establishing shot

    • C. 

      Close up

    • D. 

      Sequence

    • E. 

      Shot

  • 9. 
    A single, uninterrupted piece of film.
    • A. 

      Long shot

    • B. 

      Close up

    • C. 

      Medium shot

    • D. 

      Sequence

    • E. 

      Shot

  • 10. 
    A collection of shots forming a natural unit; the shots are no longer perceived as a set of individual shots.
    • A. 

      Long shot

    • B. 

      Close up

    • C. 

      Medium shot

    • D. 

      Sequence

    • E. 

      Shot

  • 11. 
    This type of lighting creates suspense or suspicion in a scene.
    • A. 

      High key lighting

    • B. 

      Low key lighting

    • C. 

      Neutral lighting

    • D. 

      Bottom/side lighting

    • E. 

      Front/rear lighting

  • 12. 
      even lighting throughout the shot; most commonly used
    • A. 

      High key lighting

    • B. 

      Low key lighting

    • C. 

      Neutral lighting

    • D. 

      Bottom/side lighting

    • E. 

      Front/rear lighting

  • 13. 
    creates bright and open-looking scene; conveys warmth, comfort, happiness.
    • A. 

      High key lighting

    • B. 

      Low key lighting

    • C. 

      Neutral lighting

    • D. 

      Bottom/side lighting

    • E. 

      Front/rear lighting

  • 14. 
    direct lighting from below or from one side; often dangerous or evil- looking, may convey split personality, moral ambiguity, or secrecy.
    • A. 

      High key lighting

    • B. 

      Low key lighting

    • C. 

      Neutral lighting

    • D. 

      Bottom/side lighting

    • E. 

      Front rear lighting

  • 15. 
    Direct lighting of an object/person; gives an angelic or innocent impression
    • A. 

      High key lighting

    • B. 

      Low key lighting

    • C. 

      Neutral lighting

    • D. 

      Front/rear lighting

    • E. 

      Bottom/side lighting

  • 16. 
    When a director shifts the focus from one object to another in the same shot in order to direct the audience’s attention. Often signifies a change of power or significance. 
    • A. 

      Soft focus

    • B. 

      Deep focus

    • C. 

      Rack focus

  • 17. 
    When foreground and background are equally in focus
    • A. 

      Soft focus

    • B. 

      Deep focus

    • C. 

      Rack focus

  • 18. 
    When a director intentionally puts his or her object slightly out of focus to make the image look unclear
    • A. 

      Soft focus

    • B. 

      Deep focus

    • C. 

      Rack focus

  • 19. 
    The focal length of the lens changes,  making the object appear to move closer or further away. The lens moves focusing on an important object or face.
    • A. 

      Pan

    • B. 

      Tilt

    • C. 

      Zoom

    • D. 

      Tracking/dolly

  • 20. 
    The camera moves up and down along the vertical axis; often used to emphasize impressiveness of a character or setting.
    • A. 

      Pan

    • B. 

      Tilt

    • C. 

      Zoom

    • D. 

      Tracking/dolly

  • 21. 
    The camera itself is moving with the action – on a track, on wheels, or hand held. Often used for “walk & talks”.
    • A. 

      Pan

    • B. 

      Tilt

    • C. 

      Zoom

    • D. 

      Tracking/dolly

  • 22. 
    The camera pivots along the horizontal axis, left or right; usually for viewer to take in scenery.
    • A. 

      Pan

    • B. 

      Tilt

    • C. 

      Zoom

    • D. 

      Tracking/dolly

  • 23. 
    An image overlaps into another; can create a connection between images. 
    • A. 

      Cut

    • B. 

      Fade

    • C. 

      Dissolve

    • D. 

      Eye-line match

  • 24. 
    Scene fades to black (or another color); often implies that time has passed. 
    • A. 

      Cut

    • B. 

      Fade

    • C. 

      Dissolve

    • D. 

      Eye-line match

  • 25. 
    Abrupt transition of visual content from one shot to another; most common form of editing.
    • A. 

      Cut

    • B. 

      Fade

    • C. 

      Dissolve

    • D. 

      Eye-line match

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