The Westing Game Chapters 1-4

25 Questions | Total Attempts: 249

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The Westing Game Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Which word best describes the mood of Chapters 1-4?
    • A. 

      Joyful

    • B. 

      Suspenseful

    • C. 

      Merry

    • D. 

      Sorrowful

  • 2. 
    The Westing Game is told from which point of view?
    • A. 

      1st person through Turtle

    • B. 

      3rd person omniscient narrator

    • C. 

      3rd person limited to Turtle

    • D. 

      3rd person switching from the perspective of one character to another

  • 3. 
    What type of figurative language does this line contain? They faced north, gaping like statues cast in the moment of discovery.
    • A. 

      Personification

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Alliteration

  • 4. 
    What genre is The Westing Game?
    • A. 

      Drama

    • B. 

      Adventure

    • C. 

      Mystery

    • D. 

      Thriller

  • 5. 
    How is Chris Theodorakis different from most boys?
    • A. 

      He runs track.

    • B. 

      He wants to be a writer.

    • C. 

      He doesn't go outside his apartment.

    • D. 

      He kicks people in the shin when they touch his hair.

  • 6. 
    What is the idiom from this line? "One fella ran out crazy-like, screaming his head off. He never stopped screaming 'til he hit the rocks at the bottom of the cliff."
    • A. 

      Screaming his head off

    • B. 

      Ran out crazy-like

    • C. 

      Bottom of the cliff

    • D. 

      Never stopped screaming

  • 7. 
    Which word best describes Turtle in Chapters 3-4?
    • A. 

      Daring

    • B. 

      Anxious

    • C. 

      Bossy

    • D. 

      Logical

  • 8. 
    What type of figurative language is used in this line? At last slow morning crept up the cliff, and raised the Westing House, the house of whispers, the house of death.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Repetition

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

    • D. 

      Personification

  • 9. 
    What literary device is being used in this line? "No one ever notices Sydelle Pulaski," she muttered, "but now they will. Now they will."
    • A. 

      Flashback

    • B. 

      Foreshadowing

    • C. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • D. 

      Simile

  • 10. 
    Which character could be described as uppity and full of herself?  
    • A. 

      Flora Baumbach

    • B. 

      Grace Wexler

    • C. 

      Angela Wexler

    • D. 

      Sydelle Pulaski

  • 11. 
    Which event happened first in the story?
    • A. 

      Sydelle Pulaski came home with six cans of enamel, paint thinner, and brushes plus four wooden crutches.

    • B. 

      Angela tries on her wedding dress.

    • C. 

      Theo told Chris a story.

    • D. 

      Mr. Hoo tells Doug to do his homework.

  • 12. 
    What is the setting of the story?
    • A. 

      Sunset Towers in New York

    • B. 

      A train station in Toronto

    • C. 

      A magical castle called Hogwarts

    • D. 

      An apartment building on the shore of Lake Michigan in Wisconsin

  • 13. 
    Mysteries often begin with a...
    • A. 

      Major disaster

    • B. 

      A birthday party

    • C. 

      Crime or murder

    • D. 

      A loud noise

  • 14. 
    Who is the character that is religious?
    • A. 

      Angela

    • B. 

      Grace

    • C. 

      Sydelle

    • D. 

      Crow

  • 15. 
    Choose the correct definition of tenants.
    • A. 

      Decayed with usually a very bad or disgusting smell

    • B. 

      To try to solve a problem; to deal with a problem

    • C. 

      Not having enough of something for comfort or happiness

    • D. 

      Someone who rents or leases a house, apartment, etc., from a landlord

  • 16. 
    Choose the correct definition of putrid.
    • A. 

      Someone who rents or leases a house, apartment, etc., from a landlord

    • B. 

      Decayed with usually a very bad or disgusting smell

    • C. 

      To try to solve a problem; to deal with a problem

    • D. 

      Not having enough of something for comfort or happiness

  • 17. 
    Choose the correct definition of grapple.
    • A. 

      Decayed with usually a very bad or disgusting smell

    • B. 

      To try to solve a problem; to deal with a problem

    • C. 

      Not having enough of something for comfort or happiness

    • D. 

      Someone who rents or leases a house, apartment, etc., from a landlord

  • 18. 
    Choose the correct definition of meager.
    • A. 

      Not having enough of something for comfort or happiness

    • B. 

      To try to solve a problem; to deal with a problem

    • C. 

      Someone who rents or leases a house, apartment, etc., from a landlord

    • D. 

      Decayed with usually a very bad or disgusting smell

  • 19. 
    Define personification.
    • A. 

      A comparison between unlike things that uses like, as, or than; ex. He ran like a fox.

    • B. 

      When an author gives human characteristics to something that is not human; ex. the wind whispered

    • C. 

      A phrase that means something other than what the words in it mean; ex. raining cats and dogs

    • D. 

      The repetition of a beginning consonant sound throughout a line or passage; ex. Peter Piper picked a pepper.

  • 20. 
    Define simile.
    • A. 

      A comparison between unlike things that uses like, as, or than; ex. He ran like a fox.

    • B. 

      Words that imitate sounds; ex. thump

    • C. 

      The repetition of a word or phrase to stress something of importance; ex. Stop, stop, stop!

    • D. 

      A comparison between unlike things that does NOT use like or as; ex. He is a lion on the football field!

  • 21. 
    Define idiom.
    • A. 

      A phrase that means something other than what the words in it mean; ex. raining cats and dogs

    • B. 

      When an author gives human characteristics to something that is not human; ex. the wind whispered

    • C. 

      The repetition of a beginning consonant sound throughout a line or passage; ex. Peter Piper picked a pepper.

    • D. 

      A comparison between unlike things that uses like, as, or than; ex. He ran like a fox.

  • 22. 
    Define alliteration.
    • A. 

      A comparison between unlike things that uses like, as, or than; ex. He ran like a fox.

    • B. 

      When an author gives human characteristics to something that is not human; ex. the wind whispered

    • C. 

      A phrase that means something other than what the words in it mean; ex. raining cats and dogs

    • D. 

      The repetition of a beginning consonant sound throughout a line or passage; ex. Peter Piper picked a pepper.

  • 23. 
    Define onomatopoeia.
    • A. 

      The repetition of a word or phrase to stress something of importance; ex. Stop, stop, stop!

    • B. 

      A comparison between unlike things that uses like, as, or than; ex. He ran like a fox.

    • C. 

      Words that imitate sounds; ex. thump

    • D. 

      A comparison between unlike things that does NOT use like or as; ex. He is a lion on the football field!

  • 24. 
    Define metaphor.
    • A. 

      A comparison between unlike things that uses like, as, or than; ex. He ran like a fox.

    • B. 

      Words that imitate sounds; ex. thump

    • C. 

      The repetition of a word or phrase to stress something of importance; ex. Stop, stop, stop!

    • D. 

      A comparison between unlike things that does NOT use like or as; ex. He is a lion on the football field!

  • 25. 
    Define repetition.
    • A. 

      A comparison between unlike things that uses like, as, or than; ex. He ran like a fox.

    • B. 

      Words that imitate sounds; ex. thump

    • C. 

      The repetition of a word or phrase to stress something of importance; ex. Stop, stop, stop!

    • D. 

      A comparison between unlike things that does NOT use like or as; ex. He is a lion on the football field!

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