The New Deal- Ch.15 (Diaz)

34 Questions | Total Attempts: 40

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The New Deal- Ch.15 (Diaz)

The only note you can use without penalty is the chart with the New Deal agencies. Using notes from the chapter is allowed but the highest grade you will receive is a B.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    During the 1930's the government spent more money than it took in from taxes in an attempt to improve the economy.  What is the policy of spending more money than the government receives in revenue?
    • A. 

      Deficit spending

    • B. 

      New deal spending

    • C. 

      Glass Steagall spending

    • D. 

      National Industrial Recovery spending

  • 2. 
    The Works Progess Administration's (WPA) immediate goal was to ______________________
    • A. 

      Give farmers a subsidy

    • B. 

      Help unions

    • C. 

      Create as many jobs as possible

    • D. 

      Provide an education to men

  • 3. 
    What is the point of the Wagner Act?
    • A. 

      To help feed the homeless

    • B. 

      To provide protection for labor unions and improve working conditions

    • C. 

      To provide aid to those 65 and older and unemployed insurance

    • D. 

      To create more regulation for banks and provide insurance for deposits.

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 4. 
    Who played a key role in advising FDR to hire minorties and women?
    • A. 

      Huey Long

    • B. 

      Eleanor Roosevelt

    • C. 

      Father Coughlin

    • D. 

      John Collier

  • 5. 
    Which New Deal organization is most likely responsible for this mural in the Ames post office?
    • A. 

      The Civilian Conservation Corps

    • B. 

      Works Progress Administration

    • C. 

      National Youth Administration

    • D. 

      Tennessee Valley Authority

  • 6. 
    Orson Wells created nation wide panic with_______________________
    • A. 

      Grapes of Wrath

    • B. 

      Gone with the Wind

    • C. 

      War of the Worlds

    • D. 

      Fireside Chat

  • 7. 
    The name of Franklin D. Roosevelt's plan to help the United States recover from the Great Depression was called the Real Deal for Recovery
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    President Roosevelt used radio talks to explain several of the government's new agencies introduced during the New Deal and to gather support for his plan to combat the New Deal.  What were these radio talks called?
    • A. 

      Fireside chats

    • B. 

      Glass-Steagall radio shows

    • C. 

      New Deal speeches

    • D. 

      State of the Union

  • 9. 
    1934- Fireside Chat I am happy to report that after years of uncertainty, culminating in the collapse of the spring of 1933, we are bringing order out of the old chaos with a greater certainty of the employment of labor at a reasonable wage and of more business at a fair profit. These governmental and industrial developments hold promise of new achievements for the nation. Men may differ as to the particular form of governmental activity with respect to industry and business, but nearly all are agreed that private enterprise in times such as these cannot be left without assistance and without reasonable safeguards lest it destroy not only itself but also our processes of civilization. It was in this spirit … that we approached our task of reviving private enterprise in March, 1933. Our first problem was, of course, the banking situation because, as you know, the banks had collapsed. Some banks could not be saved but the great majority of them, either through their own resources or with government aid, have been restored to complete public confidence. This has given safety to millions of depositors in these banks. Closely following this great constructive effort we have, through various Federal agencies, saved debtors and creditors alike in many other fields of enterprise, such as loans on farm mortgages and home mortgages; loans to the railroads and insurance companies and, finally, help for home owners and industry itself… The second step we have taken in the restoration of normal business enterprise has been to clean up thoroughly unwholesome conditions in the field of investment…The country now enjoys the safety of bank savings under the new banking laws, the careful checking of new securities under the Securities Act and the curtailment of rank stock speculation through the Securities Exchange Act… The emergency purpose of the N. R. A. was to put men to work and since its creation more than four million persons have been re-employed, in great part through the cooperation of American business brought about under the codes. Benefits of the Industrial Recovery Program have come, not only to labor in the form of new jobs, in relief from over-work and in relief from under-pay, but also to the owners and managers of industry because, together with a great increase in the payrolls, there has come a substantial rise in the total of industrial profits – a rise from a deficit figure in the first quarter of 1933 to a level of sustained profits within one year from the inauguration of N. R. A. Who is most likely the author of this primary document?
    • A. 

      Huey Long

    • B. 

      Herbert Hoover

    • C. 

      Father Coughlin

    • D. 

      Franklin D. Roosevelt

  • 10. 
    1934- Fireside Chat I am happy to report that after years of uncertainty, culminating in the collapse of the spring of 1933, we are bringing order out of the old chaos with a greater certainty of the employment of labor at a reasonable wage and of more business at a fair profit. These governmental and industrial developments hold promise of new achievements for the nation. Men may differ as to the particular form of governmental activity with respect to industry and business, but nearly all are agreed that private enterprise in times such as these cannot be left without assistance and without reasonable safeguards lest it destroy not only itself but also our processes of civilization. It was in this spirit … that we approached our task of reviving private enterprise in March, 1933. Our first problem was, of course, the banking situation because, as you know, the banks had collapsed. Some banks could not be saved but the great majority of them, either through their own resources or with government aid, have been restored to complete public confidence. This has given safety to millions of depositors in these banks. Closely following this great constructive effort we have, through various Federal agencies, saved debtors and creditors alike in many other fields of enterprise, such as loans on farm mortgages and home mortgages; loans to the railroads and insurance companies and, finally, help for home owners and industry itself… The second step we have taken in the restoration of normal business enterprise has been to clean up thoroughly unwholesome conditions in the field of investment…The country now enjoys the safety of bank savings under the new banking laws, the careful checking of new securities under the Securities Act and the curtailment of rank stock speculation through the Securities Exchange Act… The emergency purpose of the N. R. A. was to put men to work and since its creation more than four million persons have been re-employed, in great part through the cooperation of American business brought about under the codes. Benefits of the Industrial Recovery Program have come, not only to labor in the form of new jobs, in relief from over-work and in relief from under-pay, but also to the owners and managers of industry because, together with a great increase in the payrolls, there has come a substantial rise in the total of industrial profits – a rise from a deficit figure in the first quarter of 1933 to a level of sustained profits within one year from the inauguration of N. R. A. According to the document, why does the author think that the government needed to fix the banking situation?
    • A. 

      Because the banks were corrupt

    • B. 

      He does not think the government should have fixed the banking situation

    • C. 

      Because it has given safety to Americans who deposit their money in banks.

    • D. 

      Because it has provided millions of jobs for bankers who would have otherwise lost their jobs.

  • 11. 
    1934- Fireside Chat I am happy to report that after years of uncertainty, culminating in the collapse of the spring of 1933, we are bringing order out of the old chaos with a greater certainty of the employment of labor at a reasonable wage and of more business at a fair profit. These governmental and industrial developments hold promise of new achievements for the nation. Men may differ as to the particular form of governmental activity with respect to industry and business, but nearly all are agreed that private enterprise in times such as these cannot be left without assistance and without reasonable safeguards lest it destroy not only itself but also our processes of civilization. It was in this spirit … that we approached our task of reviving private enterprise in March, 1933. Our first problem was, of course, the banking situation because, as you know, the banks had collapsed. Some banks could not be saved but the great majority of them, either through their own resources or with government aid, have been restored to complete public confidence. This has given safety to millions of depositors in these banks. Closely following this great constructive effort we have, through various Federal agencies, saved debtors and creditors alike in many other fields of enterprise, such as loans on farm mortgages and home mortgages; loans to the railroads and insurance companies and, finally, help for home owners and industry itself… The second step we have taken in the restoration of normal business enterprise has been to clean up thoroughly unwholesome conditions in the field of investment…The country now enjoys the safety of bank savings under the new banking laws, the careful checking of new securities under the Securities Act and the curtailment of rank stock speculation through the Securities Exchange Act… The emergency purpose of the N. R. A. was to put men to work and since its creation more than four million persons have been re-employed, in great part through the cooperation of American business brought about under the codes. Benefits of the Industrial Recovery Program have come, not only to labor in the form of new jobs, in relief from over-work and in relief from under-pay, but also to the owners and managers of industry because, together with a great increase in the payrolls, there has come a substantial rise in the total of industrial profits – a rise from a deficit figure in the first quarter of 1933 to a level of sustained profits within one year from the inauguration of N. R. A. According to the author of the document what did the National Recovery Act do?
    • A. 

      It has put men to work

    • B. 

      It has put women to work

    • C. 

      It has stopped banks from collapsing

    • D. 

      It has raised the prices of agricultural goods

  • 12. 
    1934- Fireside Chat I am happy to report that after years of uncertainty, culminating in the collapse of the spring of 1933, we are bringing order out of the old chaos with a greater certainty of the employment of labor at a reasonable wage and of more business at a fair profit. These governmental and industrial developments hold promise of new achievements for the nation. Men may differ as to the particular form of governmental activity with respect to industry and business, but nearly all are agreed that private enterprise in times such as these cannot be left without assistance and without reasonable safeguards lest it destroy not only itself but also our processes of civilization. It was in this spirit … that we approached our task of reviving private enterprise in March, 1933. Our first problem was, of course, the banking situation because, as you know, the banks had collapsed. Some banks could not be saved but the great majority of them, either through their own resources or with government aid, have been restored to complete public confidence. This has given safety to millions of depositors in these banks. Closely following this great constructive effort we have, through various Federal agencies, saved debtors and creditors alike in many other fields of enterprise, such as loans on farm mortgages and home mortgages; loans to the railroads and insurance companies and, finally, help for home owners and industry itself… The second step we have taken in the restoration of normal business enterprise has been to clean up thoroughly unwholesome conditions in the field of investment…The country now enjoys the safety of bank savings under the new banking laws, the careful checking of new securities under the Securities Act and the curtailment of rank stock speculation through the Securities Exchange Act… The emergency purpose of the N. R. A. was to put men to work and since its creation more than four million persons have been re-employed, in great part through the cooperation of American business brought about under the codes. Benefits of the Industrial Recovery Program have come, not only to labor in the form of new jobs, in relief from over-work and in relief from under-pay, but also to the owners and managers of industry because, together with a great increase in the payrolls, there has come a substantial rise in the total of industrial profits – a rise from a deficit figure in the first quarter of 1933 to a level of sustained profits within one year from the inauguration of N. R. A. What are the two main topics of the fireside chat?
    • A. 

      Banks and Jobs

    • B. 

      Banks and Agriculture

    • C. 

      Jobs and Profits

    • D. 

      Stock market and Banks

  • 13. 
          Who does the seated man represent?
    • A. 

      Franklin D. Roosevelt

    • B. 

      Congress

    • C. 

      The American public

    • D. 

      Herbert Hoover

  • 14. 
    Which character is portrayed as the doctor in this document? 
    • A. 

      Franklin D. Roosevelt

    • B. 

      Congress

    • C. 

      The United States

    • D. 

      Herbert Hoover

  • 15. 
    What do each of the bottles on the table represent?
    • A. 

      Opposition to the New Deal

    • B. 

      New Deal Agencies that have been ruled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court

    • C. 

      New Deal Agencies that were created to combat the "sick" economy

    • D. 

      Common drugs used during the Great Depression

  • 16. 
    Which of the following New Deal laws created old-age retirement benefits during the Great Depression?
    • A. 

      Civilian Conservation Corps

    • B. 

      Works Progress Administration

    • C. 

      National Recovery Industrial Administration

    • D. 

      Social Security Act

  • 17. 
    Which New Deal legislation created an insurance program for people who deposited money in banks?
    • A. 

      Social Security Act (SSA)

    • B. 

      Works Progress Administration (WPA)

    • C. 

      Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)

    • D. 

      Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

  • 18. 
    Beginning  in 1929, migrant workes from this group, were deported by the thousands in an effort by the U.S. government to reduce competition for jobs.
    • A. 

      African-Americans

    • B. 

      Native-Americans

    • C. 

      European-Americans

    • D. 

      Mexican-Americans

  • 19. 
    The New Deal coalition is a broad range of groups that supported the Democratic party in the 1930's and 1940's.  This coalition consisted of Southern whites, urban residents, African-Americans, Mexican Americans, and industrial workers
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 20. 
    F. Perkins became the first ____________ to reach the highest levels of U.S. govenment when he/she became a cabinet member in Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration
    • A. 

      African-American

    • B. 

      Woman

    • C. 

      Native American

    • D. 

      Mexican American

  • 21. 
    Which of the following New Deal Agencies hired young men between the ages of 18-25 to work on environmental projects that included creating parks, trails, planting trees, and helping in soil-erosion.
    • A. 

      Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

    • B. 

      Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)

    • C. 

      National Parks Administration (NPA)

    • D. 

      Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA)

  • 22. 
    Huey Long and Father Coughlin were critics of FDR and his policies.  They focused their speeches on freedom and income equality.  They claimed they spoke for the people and against the elites.  This uniquely American speech pattern is called __________
    • A. 

      Fireside chats

    • B. 

      Populism

    • C. 

      Anarchism

    • D. 

      Conservativism

  • 23. 
    Which of the following, at one point or another, did not agree with the New Deal FDR proposed
    • A. 

      Huey Long

    • B. 

      Herbert Hoover

    • C. 

      Supreme Court

    • D. 

      All options

    • E. 

      Charles Coughlin

  • 24. 
    Which of the following was NOT a goal of the New Deal?
    • A. 

      Recovery that would improve the economy

    • B. 

      Reform that would prevent another Great Depression

    • C. 

      Relief for the needy

    • D. 

      Revolution that would make all poor people wealthy

  • 25. 
    Which of the following agencies attempted to accomplish the goal of economic reform that would prevent another Great Depression?
    • A. 

      Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)

    • B. 

      Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA)

    • C. 

      Glass-Steagal Banking Act

    • D. 

      Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)

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