STS 214 Quiz 3

15 Questions | Total Attempts: 64

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STS 214 Quiz 3

Sts 214 quiz 3


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    In risk regulation at risk, shapiro and glicksman say that risk regulation legislation involves two choices by congress
    • A. 

      Statutory triggers and statutory standards

    • B. 

      Statutory triggers and statutory limitations

    • C. 

      Statutory limitations and statutory standards

    • D. 

      Statutory standards and statutory impositions

  • 2. 
    Shapiro & Glicksman, in risk regulation at risk, say that congress imposes statutory triggers of various kinds, which of the following is NOT one of those kinds
    • A. 

      Risk and efficiency thresholds

    • B. 

      Risk based thresholds

    • C. 

      No threshold

    • D. 

      Unreasonable risk threshold

  • 3. 
    In risk regulation at risk, shapiro & glicksman that congress tends to prefer which kinds of statutory standards?
    • A. 

      Cost benefit and open ended standards

    • B. 

      Open ended and constrained balancing standards

    • C. 

      Constrained balancing and phaseout standards

    • D. 

      Phaseout and cost benefit standards

  • 4. 
    Shapiro and glicksman, in risk regulation at risk, say that congress has
    • A. 

      Generally avoided product or substance phaseouts

    • B. 

      Regularly imposed product or substance phaseouts

    • C. 

      Never imposed product or substance phaseouts

    • D. 

      Increased reliance on phaseouts since the onset of the environment movement

  • 5. 
    In risk regulation at risk, Shapiro and glicksman say that congress generally requires
    • A. 

      That costs of regulation not be considered

    • B. 

      That costs of regulation cannot be measured, and thus cannot be required

    • C. 

      That costs of regulation be taken into account by agencies

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 6. 
    Shapiro and glicksman, in risk regulation at risk, say that the critics of risk regulation have
    • A. 

      Secured a number of administrative procedures that implement their rationality project

    • B. 

      Failed to secure administrative procedures that implement their rationality project

    • C. 

      Lost interest in securing a number of administrative procedures that implement their rationality project

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 7. 
    In risk regulation at risk, shapiro and glicksman say that the critics of risk regulation claim that the "irrational preferences" of the public requires
    • A. 

      The elimination of public input in the risk decision process

    • B. 

      That the public demands be "filtered" through decision making tools that add rationality to the process

    • C. 

      The abandonment of all regulations

    • D. 

      That we return to the "default" risk regulators: the court and markets

  • 8. 
    In risk regulation at risk, Shapiro and glicksman say that the complaint raised by critics of risk regulation,  that risk policy has seen costs greatly exceed benefits,
    • A. 

      Must be taken seriously by pragmatists

    • B. 

      Can be ignored by pragmatists

    • C. 

      Is driven by political ideology

    • D. 

      Is correct

  • 9. 
    Shapiro and glicksman, in risk regulation at risk, say that "comprehensive rationality" is
    • A. 

      Essential in pragmatic risk policy

    • B. 

      Now possible thanks to modern computers

    • C. 

      Impossible

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 10. 
    In risk regulation at risk, shapiro and glicksman say that the concept of "bounded rationality" means that
    • A. 

      Decision making is limited by time, resources, and cognitive ablities

    • B. 

      Decision makers should follow market discipline

    • C. 

      Policy makers should carefully measure public opinion while making decisions

    • D. 

      Real policy making about risk is "bounded" by political constraints

  • 11. 
    In risk regulation at risk, shapiro and glicksman say that pragmatists accept
    • A. 

      That the comprehensive rationality should be the basis of risk management

    • B. 

      That at degree of "muddling through" is inevitable in risk policy

    • C. 

      "incremental decision making" is never appropriate

    • D. 

      "incremental decision making" is merely disguised politics

  • 12. 
    In risk regulation at risk, shapiro and glicksman say that a pragmatic approach to risk management favors
    • A. 

      The promotion of public participation in risk decisions

    • B. 

      The reduction of public participation in risk decisions, because of widespread public irrationality

    • C. 

      Limiting the public participation to organized interest groups, only

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 13. 
    In risk regulation at risk, shapiro and glicksman say that pragmatic risk regulations
    • A. 

      Take costs into account as accurately as cost benefit analysis

    • B. 

      Take costs into account, when required to by law

    • C. 

      Take costs into account, but not in the manner prescribed by economic theory

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 14. 
    In risk regulation at risk, shapiro and glicksman say that there have been noticeable, and in some cases dramatic, reduction in risk posed by modern technology since the
    • A. 

      1960's

    • B. 

      1970's

    • C. 

      1980's

    • D. 

      1990's

  • 15. 
    In Risk Regulation at Risk, Shapiro and Glicksman say that regulators sometimes mis-use their discretion, and therefore
    • A. 

      Bureaucratic discretion should be eliminated completely

    • B. 

      We should just ignore these rare occurences

    • C. 

      We should preserve bureaucratic discretion, while making regulator accountable

    • D. 

      Regulations should use a strictly enforced cost-benefit analysis

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