Storm On The Island

41 Questions | Total Attempts: 299

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Storm On The Island

Seamus Heney talks about the Storm on the Island so vividly but since he tries to imply this to the life of human beings, it becomes hard to fully understand. Find out what exactly he meant and what were the storm and the island in the quiz below.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Where was Seamus Heaney born?
    • A. 

      England

    • B. 

      Wales

    • C. 

      Ireland

    • D. 

      Spain

  • 2. 
    What do we call unrhyming lines that contain five beats or feet?
    • A. 

      Blank verse

    • B. 

      Dramatic monologue

    • C. 

      Rhyming couplets

  • 3. 
    What do we call phrases such as "as you see" (line 4), "you know what I mean" (line 7), "You might think" (line 12)
    • A. 

      Blank verse

    • B. 

      Conversational tags

    • C. 

      Dramatic monologue

    • D. 

      Personification

  • 4. 
    What do we call it when lines are not end stopped but run on from one to another?
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Personification

    • C. 

      Dramatic monologue

    • D. 

      Enjambment

  • 5. 
    Which of the following creates a conversational tone?
    • A. 

      'Can raise a tragic chorus'

    • B. 

      'you know what I mean'

    • C. 

      'exploding comfortably down the cliff'

    • D. 

      The very windows, spits like a tame cat

  • 6. 
    Which of the following devices does the poet use to present a constant flow of infomration that might reflect the constant assault of the storm on the houses?
    • A. 

      Personification

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Enjambment

    • D. 

      Use of short sentences

  • 7. 
    Which of the following is an example of oxymoron?
    • A. 

      Exploding comfortably (line 13)

    • B. 

      Blast:you know (line 7)

    • C. 

      Turned savage (line 16)

    • D. 

      Strafes invisibly

  • 8. 
    Which of the following might be examples of half rhyme?
    • A. 

      Air/fear (lines18-19)

    • B. 

      Cat/dives (lines15-16)

    • C. 

      Us/stacks (lines3-4)

  • 9. 
    Which of the following could be used to argue that the island is 'is a considerate friend who wanted to spare them the trouble of harvesting'?
    • A. 

      ""it has never troubled us"" (line 3)

    • B. 

      There are no stacks/ or stooks that can be lost (lines 3-4)

    • C. 

      Forgetting that it pummels your house too (line 10)

    • D. 

      We just sit tight while the wind drives

  • 10. 
    Which of the following could be used to suggest that 'the sea is not gentle, but spits angrily so that the spray hits the windows of the cliff-top house'?
    • A. 

      "a tame cat / Turned savage"" (line 15)

    • B. 

      'Exploding comfortably' (line 13)

    • C. 

      'And strafes invisibly' (line 17

    • D. 

      We are bombarded' (lines 18)

  • 11. 
    Which of the following can be used to suggest that although the islanders are confident in their preparations, when the storm hits, they are helpless and can do nothing but wait it out?
    • A. 

      'Which might prove company when it blows full (line 6)

    • B. 

      This wizened earth has never troubled us' (line 3)

    • C. 

      Leaves and branches/Can raise a tragic gale (line 8)

    • D. 

      'We just sit tight while the widn drives/and strafesinvisibly ( lines 16-17

  • 12. 
    Which of the following mimics the sound of the wind?
    • A. 

      The s and f sounds in dives and strafes invisibly

    • B. 

      ""leaves and branches...""

    • C. 

      ""a tame cat / Turned savage""

    • D. 

      ""rock and roof""

  • 13. 
    Which of the following create a sense of safety?
    • A. 

      We just sit tight ( line 16)

    • B. 

      We are prepared ( line 1)

    • C. 

      This wizened earth has never troubled us ( line 3)

    • D. 

      Blast: You know what I mean ( line 7)

  • 14. 
    Which of the following is an example of the writer's use of plosive sound??
    • A. 

      We just sit tight ( line 16)

    • B. 

      We are prepared ( line 1)

    • C. 

      This wizened earth has never troubled us ( line 3)

    • D. 

      Blast: You know what I mean ( line 7)

  • 15. 
    In Greek tragedy, a chorus comments on and explains events.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 16. 
    Which of the following could  be interpreted to be a juxtaposition of feelings of fear and safety?
    • A. 

      Exploding comfortably (line 13)

    • B. 

      Turned savage ( line 16)

    • C. 

      We are bombarded ( line 18)

    • D. 

      Strange, it is a huge nothing that we fear (line 19)

  • 17. 
    Form: the poem is written in blank verse which mirrors the patterns of everyday speech and makes the poem sound like everyday speech.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 18. 
    Which of the following does the poet use to slow the pace of line 11 and place emphasis on he second 'no'?
    • A. 

      Caesura

    • B. 

      Oxymoron

    • C. 

      Plosive

    • D. 

      Metaphor

  • 19. 
    What is a plosive?
    • A. 

      One person speaking for a long period of time

    • B. 

      A word that sounds like the thing/sound it is being used to describe

    • C. 

      A short burst of sound made when you say a word containing the letters b,d,g,k, p or t

    • D. 

      Repetition of 's' and 'h' sounds, e.g. sells seashells

  • 20. 
    Which of the following could you use to define the word 'tone'?
    • A. 

      An analogy or comparison implied by using an adverbial preposition such as like or as

    • B. 

      The mood or feelings suggested by the way the writer writes. e.g. thoughtful, confident

    • C. 

      A turning point in a poem, when the argument or tone changes dramatically

    • D. 

      When an object stands for something else

  • 21. 
    Which of the following is used to compare the wind to a fighter plane attacking the island?
    • A. 

      Strafes invisibly ( line 17)

    • B. 

      We are bombarded ( line 18)

    • C. 

      Exploding comfortably ( line 13)

    • D. 

      You can listen to the thing you fear ( line 9)

  • 22. 
    Which of the following combine with the poet's use of sibilant sounds to imitate the hissing and the spitting of the sea?
    • A. 

      Assonant 'i' sounds

    • B. 

      Personification

    • C. 

      Caesura

    • D. 

      Plosive

  • 23. 
    At the start of the poem the speaker sounds confident. The tone changes and the sense of danger increases as familiar things become frightening during the storm.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 24. 
    Which of the following does the speaker use to involve the reader in his fear?
    • A. 

      Peronification

    • B. 

      Caesura

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

    • D. 

      Direct address

  • 25. 
    The use of the word 'nothing' in line 19 can have at least two meanings. One could be that the storm is invisible. The other could be that the storm...
    • A. 

      Proves not to be as dangerous as it sounded

    • B. 

      Is not really a storm

    • C. 

      Existed only in the minds of the villagers

    • D. 

      Does not really happen