Trivia Quiz On Science, English, Maths! Practice Test

60 Questions | Total Attempts: 78

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Trivia Quiz On Science, English, Maths! Practice Test

Are you looking for a trivia quiz on science, English, math? If you consider yourself a genius, you are expected to have adequate knowledge when it comes to different topics, and this practice test will give you a chance to polish your understanding of the three subjects. Do give it a chance and see how well you will do in the end.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Listen to the guide telling about the tour of Kyoto. Choose the correct answer. 
  • 2. 
    A. Railways are not a modern invention as most of us think. The idea of transporting things and people on rails has been around for a long time. Rails were made of wood, stone or metal, and railway wagons were pulled by horses, some were even wind powered and had sails. At the start of the Industrial Revolution in Britain, people needed to transport raw materials such as coal, so created a network of canals and rail links between towns. But canals and horsepower were a very slow way to move things around the country, so the speed of railway wagons needed to be increased.B. By 1800 many industries were using steam engines, designed by James Watt (from where we get the electrical measurement - Watt). Richard Trevithick, a Cornish engineer, refined Watts’ invention and after failing to build a steam powered road vehicle, he designed the first locomotive for an Iron Works in Wales. He called it a 'puffer' because of the noise it made, and on its first journey it travelled at almost 8 km/h an hour! Unfortunately, it was so heavy that it broke the rails - it only made three journeys. But it had shown that steam engines could be used to move trains, and speeds began to increase.C. By 1829 locomotives were travelling at speeds of over 45km/h and the first public railway had been opened, the Stockton and Darlington Railway. The most famous early locomotive was The Rocket. In 1833 it won a competition organised by the owners of the Manchester and Liverpool railway, to find the best locomotive for their new line. Unfortunately, during the competition, a Member of Parliament wasn't careful as he crossed the tracks and The Rocket knocked him down. He died later. This was one of the first train accidents in history. D. The next 130 years can be described as a Golden Age of Steam. Railways were built all over the world, and the size, speed and comfort of trains continued to increase. By 1870 it was possible to cross America by train, and the building of railways in many other countries allowed people and progress to move quickly across the world. There were famous trains and famous journeys. The Orient Express started in 1883 and carried people in luxury through more than 13 countries between France and Turkey. The Flying Scotsman travelled non-stop from London to Edinburgh, between 1928 and 1963, and reached speeds of over 130 km/h. The Trans-Siberian railway was finished in 1916, and is still the longest railway line in the world. It goes between St. Petersburg and Vladivostok, is over 9000 km long and even today the journey takes over a week. The fastest steam train in the world was The Mallard. This locomotive travelled up and down the east coast of England between London and York, and in 1938 reached 202 km/h.E. Although it is still possible to travel on the Trans-Siberian railway, and take the Orient Express from Paris to Vienna, steam trains such as the Mallard or Flying Scotsman, have not travelled regularly for almost 30 years in many countries. Diesel powered locomotives or trains running on electrified lines now run on most railways. Modern trains are cleaner and much faster than steam engines but many people still miss the puffing sound and the romance of steam. F. Quite a few countries now use high speed trains. The famous Bullet Train in Japan and the TGV in France can both carry passengers at speeds of over 300km/h. Journey times are now much shorter, and trains can travel on some unusual routes; up hills, through mountains, even under the sea. Euro-tunnel was opened in 1994 and connects Britain to France through a railway that goes under the sea.G. The future of train travel could be in Maglev trains. These trains are supported by electro-magnets and hover off the ground. Some countries are already using this technology in cities, and others are planning to use it on longer journeys. At the moment they can go more than 500km/h, but some engineers think speeds of over 1000 km/h are possible – some even think they could be used to launch space shuttles! Trains have come a long way since Richard Trevithick’s puffer.  
  • 3. 
    The Himalayas cross five countries ……………………………… .
    • A. 

      Bhutan, India, Nepal, China, and Pakistan

    • B. 

      Bhutan, India, Afghanistan, China, and Pakistan

    • C. 

      Bhutan, India, Nepal, Indonesia, and Pakistan

    • D. 

      Australia, India, Nepal, China, and Pakistan

  • 4. 
    The higher the wind speed and the longer the distance of open water across which the wind blows and waves travel, the ____ waves and the ____ energy they process.
    • A. 

      Larger, more

    • B. 

      Larger, less

    • C. 

      Smaller, more

    • D. 

      Smaller, less

  • 5. 
    The intersecting lines drawn on maps and globes are ... .
    • A. 

      Latitudes

    • B. 

      Longitudes

    • C. 

      Geographic grids

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 6. 
    The hydrological cycle describes ... 
    • A. 

      The movement of water between biosphere and atmosphere

    • B. 

      The movement of water between lithosphere and hydrosphere.

    • C. 

      Both

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 7. 
    The Himalayan range is considered as the world’s highest mountain range, with its tallest peak …………….. on the Nepal–China border.
    • A. 

      Hindu Kush

    • B. 

      Mt. Everest

    • C. 

      Tirich Mir

    • D. 

      Kunlun

  • 8. 
    What makes the wind blow?
    • A. 

      The sun

    • B. 

      The moon

    • C. 

      The tides

    • D. 

      Respiration

  • 9. 
    Holidays In Space You've probably spent lots of holidays by the beach. So how about trying something ... different - like going into space? 
    • A. 

      Certainly

    • B. 

      Completely

    • C. 

      Properly

  • 10. 
    The special planes are expected to ... off from a 3,000-metre runway. 
    • A. 

      Put

    • B. 

      Go

    • C. 

      Take

  • 11. 
    During the flight, passengers could ... up to 15 minutes in space. 
    • A. 

      Spend

    • B. 

      Pass

    • C. 

      Use

  • 12. 
    However, tickets are likely to be ... expensive - so maybe it's a much better idea to go to the beach after all!
    • A. 

      Totally

    • B. 

      Actually

    • C. 

      Absolutely

  • 13. 
    A journey that you make to a place and back again. 
    • A. 

      Trip

    • B. 

      Travel

    • C. 

      Tour

    • D. 

      Ride

    • E. 

      Cruise

  • 14. 
    Expanding Brackets Codebreaker  Look at the code.
  • 15. 
    Solve the problem.A tourist points his camera to the top of a building forming an angle of elevation of 50 degrees. If he stands 70 meters from the building, how tall is the building?
    • A. 

      45 meters

    • B. 

      53.6 meters

    • C. 

      83.4 meters

  • 16. 
    What is the exact angle between the hands of Big Ben at 9.15?
    • A. 

      157.5 degrees

    • B. 

      172.5 degrees

    • C. 

      180 degrees

    • D. 

      270 degrees

  • 17. 
    What time is the bus leaving? 
    • A. 

      9:00

    • B. 

      9:15

    • C. 

      9:50

  • 18. 
    What is Ryoanji Temple famous for?
    • A. 

      Its trees

    • B. 

      Its stone walls

    • C. 

      Its rock garden

  • 19. 
    When was the Golden Pavilion built? 
    • A. 

      In 1397

    • B. 

      In 1379

    • C. 

      In 1339

  • 20. 
    Who invented the first steam engine for trains? 
    • A. 

      James Watt

    • B. 

      Richard Trevithick

  • 21. 
    How much time will visitors have to tour the castle? 
    • A. 

      45 minutes

    • B. 

      60 minutes

    • C. 

      55 minutes

  • 22. 
    What does the guide NOT say about Gion?
    • A. 

      There are different shops to see.

    • B. 

      Tourists should visit the theaters.

    • C. 

      Gion is representative of traditional Kyoto.

  • 23. 
    Solve the problem.In her trip to Switzerland Anna bought 3 boxes with chocolate candies: one of them contained white chocolate candies, another one milk chocolate candies, and the third box contained the mixture of both kinds. What minimal number and from which box should be taken to determine the flavor of each box, considering the fact that ALL the labels on the boxes are mixed?Write the number (in figures) and the box flavour (white/milk/mixed). Answer: [Blank] candy/ies from a [Blank] box.
  • 24. 
    The imaginary line that separates the Northern and Southern hemispheres is called [Blank]. The imaginary line that separates the Eastern and Western hemispheres is called [Blank]. 
  • 25. 
    The U.S. Capitol is located about 38 miles southwest of Baltimore. This is its ... .
    • A. 

      Relative location

    • B. 

      Cultural region

    • C. 

      Absolute location

    • D. 

      None of these

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