SAT Questions 20 Questions

22 Questions | Total Attempts: 85

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SAT Quizzes & Trivia

This is a test to test your vocabulary. Hope you suceed!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Choose the word or set of words that, when inserted in the sentence, best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.Dahntay’s ------- over winning the prestigious prize was ------- only by the fact that his father was unable to attend the ceremony.
    • A. 

      Incredulity . . misconstrued

    • B. 

      Ebullience . . tempered

    • C. 

      Bashfulness . . extended

    • D. 

      Satisfaction . . confirmed

    • E. 

      Relief . . conveyed

  • 2. 
    Hoping to ------- the dispute, negotiators proposed a compromise that they felt would be ------- to both labor and management
    • A. 

      Enforce . . useful

    • B. 

      End . . divisive

    • C. 

      Overcome . . unattractive

    • D. 

      Extend . . satisfactory

    • E. 

      Resolve . . acceptable

  • 3. 
    Because King Philip's desire to make Spain the dominant power in sixteenth-century Europe ran counter to Queen Elizabeth's insistence on autonomy for England, ------- was -------.
    • A. 

      Reconciliation . . assured

    • B. 

      Warfare . . avoidable

    • C. 

      Ruination . . impossible

    • D. 

      Conflict . . inevitable

    • E. 

      Diplomacy . . simple

  • 4. 
    SAT SENTENCE IMPROVEMENT QUESTIONS 4-8Only one out of every 150,000 chemical compounds proves useful in the field of pharmaceuticals, and thus many research scientists spend their entire careers to investigate drugs that will never receive FDA approval.
    • A. 

      Many research scientists spend their entire careers to investigate drugs

    • B. 

      Many research scientists spend their entire careers investigating drugs

    • C. 

      Many research scientists spend their entire careers investigating drugs

    • D. 

      Many research scientists spend their entire career in the investigation of drugs

    • E. 

      Many research scientists investigate drugs in their entire careers

  • 5. 
    Nomadic tribes herd their goats, sheep, and camels while practice the art of dying wool and weaving intricate carpets
    • A. 

      While practice the art of dying wool and weaving intricate carpets

    • B. 

      While to practice the art of dying wool and weaving intricate carpets

    • C. 

      Which practice the art of dying wool and weaving intricate carpets

    • D. 

      While practicing the art of dying wool and weaving intricate carpets

    • E. 

      That practice the art of dying wool and weaving intricate carpets

  • 6. 
    Alexander Pushkin, one of Russia 's great poets, had a great-grandfather who rose from slavery to becoming a Russian general and favorite advisor of Czar Peter the Great .
    • A. 

      To becoming a Russian general and favorite advisor of Czar Peter the Great

    • B. 

      Becoming a Russian general and favorite advisor of Czar Peter the Great

    • C. 

      To being a Russian general and favorite advisor of Czar Peter the Great

    • D. 

      Becoming a good Russian general and favorite advisor of Czar Peter the Great

    • E. 

      To become a Russian general and favorite advisor of Czar Peter the Great

  • 7. 
    A comparison of monthly sales showed that salespeople perform best when they see their department managers working as hard as them.
    • A. 

      As them

    • B. 

      As they were

    • C. 

      As their work

    • D. 

      As they

    • E. 

      As them working

  • 8. 
    Customers who intend buying inexpensive neckties will not find hardly any bargains on the last day of the sale
    • A. 

      Who intend buying inexpensive neckties will not find hardly any bargains

    • B. 

      Who intend buying inexpensive neckties will not find hard bargains

    • C. 

      Who intend on buying inexpensive neckties will not find hardly any bargains

    • D. 

      Who intend to buy inexpensive neckties will find few bargains

    • E. 

      Who intend buying inexpensive neckties will find few bargains

  • 9. 
    Questions 9 - 12 are based on the following passage. Paragraphs are numbered to help the reader identify the location corresponding to the question. 1. Giovanni's rage broke forth from his sullen gloom like a lightning flash out of a dark cloud. 2. "Accursed one!" cried he, with venomous scorn and anger. "And, finding thy solitude wearisome, thou hast severed me likewise from all the warmth of life and enticed me into thy region of unspeakable horror!" 3. "Giovanni!" exclaimed Beatrice, turning her large bright eyes upon his face. The force of his words had not found its way into her mind; she was merely thunderstruck. 4. "Yes, poisonous thing!" repeated Giovanni, beside himself with passion. "Thou hast done it! Thou hast blasted me! Thou hast filled my veins with poison! Thou hast made me as hateful, as ugly, as loathsome and deadly a creature as thyself-a world's wonder of hideous monstrosity! Now, if our breath be happily as fatal to ourselves as to all others, let us join our lips in one kiss of unutterable hatred, and so die!" 5. "What has befallen me?" murmured Beatrice, with a low moan out of her heart. "Holy Virgin, pity me, a poor heart-broken child!" 6. "Thou,-dost thou pray?" cried Giovanni, still with the same fiendish scorn. "Thy very prayers, as they come from thy lips, taint the atmosphere with death. Yes, yes; let us pray! Let us to church and dip our fingers in the holy water at the portal! They that come after us will perish as by a pestilence! Let us sign crosses in the air! It will be scattering curses abroad in the likeness of holy symbols!" 7. "Giovanni," said Beatrice, calmly, for her grief was beyond passion, "why dost thou join thyself with me thus in those terrible words? I, it is true, am the horrible thing thou namest me. But thou,-what hast thou to do, save with one other shudder at my hideous misery to go forth out of the garden and mingle with thy race, and forget there ever crawled on earth such a monster as poor Beatrice?" 8. "Dost thou pretend ignorance?" asked Giovanni, scowling upon her. "Behold! this power have I gained from the pure daughter of Rappaccini." 9. There was a swarm of summer insects flitting through the air in search of the food promised by the flower odors of the fatal garden. They circled round Giovanni's head, and were evidently attracted towards him by the same influence which had drawn them for an instant within the sphere of several of the shrubs. He sent forth a breath among them, and smiled bitterly at Beatrice as at least a score of the insects fell dead upon the ground. 10. "I see it! I see it!" shrieked Beatrice. "It is my father's fatal science! No, no, Giovanni; it was not I! Never! never! I dreamed only to love thee and be with thee a little time, and so to let thee pass away, leaving but thine image in mine heart; for, Giovanni, believe it, though my body be nourished with poison, my spirit is God's creature, and craves love as its daily food. But my father,-he has united us in this fearful sympathy. Yes; spurn me, tread upon me, kill me! Oh, what is death after such words as thine? But it was not I. Not for a world of bliss would I have done it." 11. Giovanni's passion had exhausted itself in its outburst from his lips. There now came across him a sense, mournful, and not without tenderness, of the intimate and peculiar relationship between Beatrice and himself. They stood, as it were, in an utter solitude, which would be made none the less solitary by the densest throng of human life. Ought not, then, the desert of humanity around them to press this insulated pair closer together? If they should be cruel to one another, who was there to be kind to them? Besides, thought Giovanni, might there not still be a hope of his returning within the limits of ordinary nature, and leading Beatrice, the redeemed Beatrice, by the hand? O, weak, and selfish, and unworthy spirit, that could dream of an earthly union and earthly happiness as possible, after such deep love had been so bitterly wronged as was Beatrice's love by Giovanni's blighting words! No, no; there could be no such hope. She must pass heavily, with that broken heart, across the borders of Time-she must bathe her hurts in some fount of paradise, and forget her grief in the light of immortality, and there be well. Question: The first sentence (Paragraph 1) is characterized by the use of
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Metaphor

    • D. 

      Alliteration

    • E. 

      Assonance

  • 10. 
    1. Giovanni's rage broke forth from his sullen gloom like a lightning flash out of a dark cloud. 2. "Accursed one!" cried he, with venomous scorn and anger. "And, finding thy solitude wearisome, thou hast severed me likewise from all the warmth of life and enticed me into thy region of unspeakable horror!" 3. "Giovanni!" exclaimed Beatrice, turning her large bright eyes upon his face. The force of his words had not found its way into her mind; she was merely thunderstruck. 4. "Yes, poisonous thing!" repeated Giovanni, beside himself with passion. "Thou hast done it! Thou hast blasted me! Thou hast filled my veins with poison! Thou hast made me as hateful, as ugly, as loathsome and deadly a creature as thyself-a world's wonder of hideous monstrosity! Now, if our breath be happily as fatal to ourselves as to all others, let us join our lips in one kiss of unutterable hatred, and so die!" 5. "What has befallen me?" murmured Beatrice, with a low moan out of her heart. "Holy Virgin, pity me, a poor heart-broken child!" 6. "Thou,-dost thou pray?" cried Giovanni, still with the same fiendish scorn. "Thy very prayers, as they come from thy lips, taint the atmosphere with death. Yes, yes; let us pray! Let us to church and dip our fingers in the holy water at the portal! They that come after us will perish as by a pestilence! Let us sign crosses in the air! It will be scattering curses abroad in the likeness of holy symbols!" 7. "Giovanni," said Beatrice, calmly, for her grief was beyond passion, "why dost thou join thyself with me thus in those terrible words? I, it is true, am the horrible thing thou namest me. But thou,-what hast thou to do, save with one other shudder at my hideous misery to go forth out of the garden and mingle with thy race, and forget there ever crawled on earth such a monster as poor Beatrice?" 8. "Dost thou pretend ignorance?" asked Giovanni, scowling upon her. "Behold! this power have I gained from the pure daughter of Rappaccini." 9. There was a swarm of summer insects flitting through the air in search of the food promised by the flower odors of the fatal garden. They circled round Giovanni's head, and were evidently attracted towards him by the same influence which had drawn them for an instant within the sphere of several of the shrubs. He sent forth a breath among them, and smiled bitterly at Beatrice as at least a score of the insects fell dead upon the ground. 10. "I see it! I see it!" shrieked Beatrice. "It is my father's fatal science! No, no, Giovanni; it was not I! Never! never! I dreamed only to love thee and be with thee a little time, and so to let thee pass away, leaving but thine image in mine heart; for, Giovanni, believe it, though my body be nourished with poison, my spirit is God's creature, and craves love as its daily food. But my father,-he has united us in this fearful sympathy. Yes; spurn me, tread upon me, kill me! Oh, what is death after such words as thine? But it was not I. Not for a world of bliss would I have done it." 11. Giovanni's passion had exhausted itself in its outburst from his lips. There now came across him a sense, mournful, and not without tenderness, of the intimate and peculiar relationship between Beatrice and himself. They stood, as it were, in an utter solitude, which would be made none the less solitary by the densest throng of human life. Ought not, then, the desert of humanity around them to press this insulated pair closer together? If they should be cruel to one another, who was there to be kind to them? Besides, thought Giovanni, might there not still be a hope of his returning within the limits of ordinary nature, and leading Beatrice, the redeemed Beatrice, by the hand? O, weak, and selfish, and unworthy spirit, that could dream of an earthly union and earthly happiness as possible, after such deep love had been so bitterly wronged as was Beatrice's love by Giovanni's blighting words! No, no; there could be no such hope. She must pass heavily, with that broken heart, across the borders of Time-she must bathe her hurts in some fount of paradise, and forget her grief in the light of immortality, and there be well. Question: Beatrice's reaction in paragraph 7 serves to
    • A. 

      Implicate her guilt in the poisoning of Giovanni

    • B. 

      Demonstrate her sense of superiority to Giovanni

    • C. 

      Reveal her unemotional and cold nature

    • D. 

      Mock Giovanni's anger and passion

    • E. 

      Illustrate her innocence and her resignation to her condition

  • 11. 
    1. Giovanni's rage broke forth from his sullen gloom like a lightning flash out of a dark cloud. 2. "Accursed one!" cried he, with venomous scorn and anger. "And, finding thy solitude wearisome, thou hast severed me likewise from all the warmth of life and enticed me into thy region of unspeakable horror!" 3. "Giovanni!" exclaimed Beatrice, turning her large bright eyes upon his face. The force of his words had not found its way into her mind; she was merely thunderstruck. 4. "Yes, poisonous thing!" repeated Giovanni, beside himself with passion. "Thou hast done it! Thou hast blasted me! Thou hast filled my veins with poison! Thou hast made me as hateful, as ugly, as loathsome and deadly a creature as thyself-a world's wonder of hideous monstrosity! Now, if our breath be happily as fatal to ourselves as to all others, let us join our lips in one kiss of unutterable hatred, and so die!" 5. "What has befallen me?" murmured Beatrice, with a low moan out of her heart. "Holy Virgin, pity me, a poor heart-broken child!" 6. "Thou,-dost thou pray?" cried Giovanni, still with the same fiendish scorn. "Thy very prayers, as they come from thy lips, taint the atmosphere with death. Yes, yes; let us pray! Let us to church and dip our fingers in the holy water at the portal! They that come after us will perish as by a pestilence! Let us sign crosses in the air! It will be scattering curses abroad in the likeness of holy symbols!" 7. "Giovanni," said Beatrice, calmly, for her grief was beyond passion, "why dost thou join thyself with me thus in those terrible words? I, it is true, am the horrible thing thou namest me. But thou,-what hast thou to do, save with one other shudder at my hideous misery to go forth out of the garden and mingle with thy race, and forget there ever crawled on earth such a monster as poor Beatrice?" 8. "Dost thou pretend ignorance?" asked Giovanni, scowling upon her. "Behold! this power have I gained from the pure daughter of Rappaccini." 9. There was a swarm of summer insects flitting through the air in search of the food promised by the flower odors of the fatal garden. They circled round Giovanni's head, and were evidently attracted towards him by the same influence which had drawn them for an instant within the sphere of several of the shrubs. He sent forth a breath among them, and smiled bitterly at Beatrice as at least a score of the insects fell dead upon the ground. 10. "I see it! I see it!" shrieked Beatrice. "It is my father's fatal science! No, no, Giovanni; it was not I! Never! never! I dreamed only to love thee and be with thee a little time, and so to let thee pass away, leaving but thine image in mine heart; for, Giovanni, believe it, though my body be nourished with poison, my spirit is God's creature, and craves love as its daily food. But my father,-he has united us in this fearful sympathy. Yes; spurn me, tread upon me, kill me! Oh, what is death after such words as thine? But it was not I. Not for a world of bliss would I have done it." 11. Giovanni's passion had exhausted itself in its outburst from his lips. There now came across him a sense, mournful, and not without tenderness, of the intimate and peculiar relationship between Beatrice and himself. They stood, as it were, in an utter solitude, which would be made none the less solitary by the densest throng of human life. Ought not, then, the desert of humanity around them to press this insulated pair closer together? If they should be cruel to one another, who was there to be kind to them? Besides, thought Giovanni, might there not still be a hope of his returning within the limits of ordinary nature, and leading Beatrice, the redeemed Beatrice, by the hand? O, weak, and selfish, and unworthy spirit, that could dream of an earthly union and earthly happiness as possible, after such deep love had been so bitterly wronged as was Beatrice's love by Giovanni's blighting words! No, no; there could be no such hope. She must pass heavily, with that broken heart, across the borders of Time-she must bathe her hurts in some fount of paradise, and forget her grief in the light of immortality, and there be well.Question: Throughout the passage, Giovanni's attitude can be characterized as all of the following EXCEPT
    • A. 

      Passionate

    • B. 

      Optimistic

    • C. 

      Scornful

    • D. 

      Bitter

    • E. 

      Regretful

  • 12. 
    1. Giovanni's rage broke forth from his sullen gloom like a lightning flash out of a dark cloud. 2. "Accursed one!" cried he, with venomous scorn and anger. "And, finding thy solitude wearisome, thou hast severed me likewise from all the warmth of life and enticed me into thy region of unspeakable horror!" 3. "Giovanni!" exclaimed Beatrice, turning her large bright eyes upon his face. The force of his words had not found its way into her mind; she was merely thunderstruck. 4. "Yes, poisonous thing!" repeated Giovanni, beside himself with passion. "Thou hast done it! Thou hast blasted me! Thou hast filled my veins with poison! Thou hast made me as hateful, as ugly, as loathsome and deadly a creature as thyself-a world's wonder of hideous monstrosity! Now, if our breath be happily as fatal to ourselves as to all others, let us join our lips in one kiss of unutterable hatred, and so die!" 5. "What has befallen me?" murmured Beatrice, with a low moan out of her heart. "Holy Virgin, pity me, a poor heart-broken child!" 6. "Thou,-dost thou pray?" cried Giovanni, still with the same fiendish scorn. "Thy very prayers, as they come from thy lips, taint the atmosphere with death. Yes, yes; let us pray! Let us to church and dip our fingers in the holy water at the portal! They that come after us will perish as by a pestilence! Let us sign crosses in the air! It will be scattering curses abroad in the likeness of holy symbols!" 7. "Giovanni," said Beatrice, calmly, for her grief was beyond passion, "why dost thou join thyself with me thus in those terrible words? I, it is true, am the horrible thing thou namest me. But thou,-what hast thou to do, save with one other shudder at my hideous misery to go forth out of the garden and mingle with thy race, and forget there ever crawled on earth such a monster as poor Beatrice?" 8. "Dost thou pretend ignorance?" asked Giovanni, scowling upon her. "Behold! this power have I gained from the pure daughter of Rappaccini." 9. There was a swarm of summer insects flitting through the air in search of the food promised by the flower odors of the fatal garden. They circled round Giovanni's head, and were evidently attracted towards him by the same influence which had drawn them for an instant within the sphere of several of the shrubs. He sent forth a breath among them, and smiled bitterly at Beatrice as at least a score of the insects fell dead upon the ground. 10. "I see it! I see it!" shrieked Beatrice. "It is my father's fatal science! No, no, Giovanni; it was not I! Never! never! I dreamed only to love thee and be with thee a little time, and so to let thee pass away, leaving but thine image in mine heart; for, Giovanni, believe it, though my body be nourished with poison, my spirit is God's creature, and craves love as its daily food. But my father,-he has united us in this fearful sympathy. Yes; spurn me, tread upon me, kill me! Oh, what is death after such words as thine? But it was not I. Not for a world of bliss would I have done it." 11. Giovanni's passion had exhausted itself in its outburst from his lips. There now came across him a sense, mournful, and not without tenderness, of the intimate and peculiar relationship between Beatrice and himself. They stood, as it were, in an utter solitude, which would be made none the less solitary by the densest throng of human life. Ought not, then, the desert of humanity around them to press this insulated pair closer together? If they should be cruel to one another, who was there to be kind to them? Besides, thought Giovanni, might there not still be a hope of his returning within the limits of ordinary nature, and leading Beatrice, the redeemed Beatrice, by the hand? O, weak, and selfish, and unworthy spirit, that could dream of an earthly union and earthly happiness as possible, after such deep love had been so bitterly wronged as was Beatrice's love by Giovanni's blighting words! No, no; there could be no such hope. She must pass heavily, with that broken heart, across the borders of Time-she must bathe her hurts in some fount of paradise, and forget her grief in the light of immortality, and there be well.  Question:The third sentence in paragraph 11 is best understood to mean that
    • A. 

      Being surrounded by other people is a sufficient cure for Beatrice's and Giovanni's loneliness

    • B. 

      Even a dense crowd of people cannot thwart Beatrice's and Giovanni's hope of being alone

    • C. 

      The poisonous condition of Beatrice and Giovanni separates them from the rest of human society

    • D. 

      Other people are unable to penetrate the self-imposed solitude of Beatrice and Giovanni

    • E. 

      Beatrice and Giovanni will always be noticeable in a crowd because of their unique condition

  • 13. 
    SAT: Error Identification QuestionsQuestion: Today, as (a) he left for the central office (b), Kenneth felt the uncontrollable urge to change (c) his busy life (d). No error (e)
    • A. 

      Today, as

    • B. 

      Central office

    • C. 

      To change

    • D. 

      His busy life

    • E. 

      No error

  • 14. 
    Question: While some simply cannot properly (a) digest lactose, others develop a intolerance (b) over time (c), despite the fact that as young people, they (d) had no such problems. No error (e)
    • A. 

      Simply cannot properly

    • B. 

      A intolerance

    • C. 

      Over time

    • D. 

      People, they

    • E. 

      No Error

  • 15. 
    Youth (a), as the Greeks and other early civilizations (b) knew, are best spent (c) as a time of learning and of recreation (d). No error (e)
    • A. 

      Youth

    • B. 

      Other early civilizations

    • C. 

      Are best spent

    • D. 

      And of recreation

    • E. 

      No error

  • 16. 
    Question: How (a) people naturally (b) divide themselves (c) is sometimes as important as the way's (d) they feel united. No error (e)
    • A. 

      How

    • B. 

      Naturally

    • C. 

      Themselves

    • D. 

      Way's

    • E. 

      No Error

  • 17. 
    Question: June of 2001, the (a) hottest month that (b) anyone (c) we knew could recall (d). No error (e)
    • A. 

      2001, the

    • B. 

      Month that

    • C. 

      Anyone

    • D. 

      Could recall

    • E. 

      No Error

  • 18. 
    Question: On paper there (a) was nothing wrong with (b) the artists' proposal (c) to build the statue honoring the former governor (d). No error (e)
    • A. 

      Paper there

    • B. 

      Wrong with

    • C. 

      Artists' proposal

    • D. 

      Honoring the former governor

    • E. 

      No Error

  • 19. 
    Finding work right out of college (a) has become the main priority for soon-to-be (b) college graduates, eclipsing (c) world travel or post-graduate (d) research. No error (e)
    • A. 

      Right out of college

    • B. 

      Soon-to-be

    • C. 

      Graduates, eclipsing

    • D. 

      Post-graduate

    • E. 

      No Error

  • 20. 
     Sentence Completion Questions 20-22 Question: Because she thought her hateful cousin's behavior was _____ , it _____ her to hear the adults praise him
    • A. 

      Intangible..thrilled

    • B. 

      Putative..baffled

    • C. 

      Laconic..encouraged

    • D. 

      Insipid..demeaned

    • E. 

      Obnoxious..galled

  • 21. 
    Question: While maintaining an outward appearance of religious _____, medieval scholar Peter Abelard revealed, in his writings, hope for the triumph of reason over faith
    • A. 

      Heterodoxy

    • B. 

      Orthodoxy

    • C. 

      Incredulity

    • D. 

      Vacillation

    • E. 

      Skepticism

  • 22. 
    LAST ONE!!!!!!My cat Lloyd loves to go for car rides and will jump into the back seat with _____ whenever he is invited.
    • A. 

      Devotion

    • B. 

      Aggravation

    • C. 

      Dedication

    • D. 

      Alacrity

    • E. 

      Apathy

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