SAT Diagnostic Practice Test 1

107 Questions | Total Attempts: 141

SettingsSettingsSettings
SAT Diagnostic Practice Test 1 - Quiz

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 Passage I Fiction: This passage is adapled from The Diamond Necklace by Guy De Maupaussant, originally published in 1907; English adaptation from Original Short Stories - Volume 4, published prior to 1923. She had no gowns. no jewels. nothing. And she loved nothing but that. She felt made for that. She would have liked so much to please. lo be envied, to be charming, to be sought after. She had a friend, a former schoolmate at the convent. who was rich, and whom she did not like to go and see any more. because she suffered so much when she came back But, one evening, her husband returned home with a triumphant air, holding a large envelope in his hand. “There,' said he, “here is something for you.” She tore the paper sharply and drew out a printed card which bore these words: The Minister of Public Instruction and Mme. Georges Ramponneau request the honor of M. and Mme. Loisels' company at the palace of the Ministry on Monday evening, January 18th. Instead of being delighted, as her husband hoped she threw the invitation on the table with disdain, murmuring, “What do you want me to do with that?" "But, my dear.” he said. “I thought you would be glad. You never go out, and this is such a fine oppor- tunity. I had awful trouble to get it. Every one wants to go; it is vary select, and they are not giving many invitations to clerks. The whole official world will be there. She looked at him with an irritated eye and said. impatiently, “And what do you want me to put on my back?" He had not thought Of that; he Stammered, “Why the dress you go to the theater in. lt looks very well … to me.” He stopped. distracted. seeing that his wife was crying. Two great tears descended slowly from the corners of her eyes towards the comers of her mouth He stuttered, “What`s the matter? What's the matter? But, by a violent effort, she had conquered her grief and replied. with a calm voice. while she wiped her wet cheeks, “Nothing Only I have no dress. and therefore I can't go to this ball. Give your card to some colleague whose wife is better equipped than I He was in despair. He resumed, "Come, let us see. Mathilde. How much would it cost. a suitable dress. which you could use on other occasions, something very simple?" She reflected several seconds. making her calcu- lations and wondering also what sum she could ask without drawing on herself an immediate refusal and a frightened exclamation from the economical clerk. Finally, she replied, hesitatingly: “I don‘t know exactly, but I think I could manage it with four hundred francs.” He grew a little pale, because he was laying aside just that amount to buy a gun and treat himself to a little shooting next summer on the plain of Nanterre, with several friends who went to shoot larks down there, of a Sunday. But he said: “All right. I will give you four hundred francs. And try to have a pretty dress.”
  • 2. 
    The extract is taken from a book written sixty years ago by a British scientist in which he considers the relationship between science and society.      The pioneers of the teaching of science imagined that its      introduction into education would remove the conventionality,      artificiality, and backward-lookingness which were characteristic;      of classical studies, but they were gravely disappointed. So, too, in 5   their time had the humanists thought that the study of the classical      authors in the original would banish at once the dull pedantry and      superstition of medieval scholasticism. The professional      schoolmaster was a match for both of them, and has almost      managed to make the understanding of chemical reactions as dull 10 and as dogmatic an affair as the reading of Virgil's Aeneid.      The chief claim for the use of science in education is that it      teaches a child something about the actual universe in which he is      living, in making him acquainted with the results of scientific 15 discovery, and at the same time teaches him how to think logically      and inductively by studying scientific method. A certain limited      success has been reached in the first of these aims, but practically      none at all in the second. Those privileged members of the      community who have been through a secondary or public school 20 education may be expected to know something about the      elementary physics and chemistry of a hundred years ago, but they      probably know hardly more than any bright boy can pick up from      an interest in wireless or scientific hobbies out of school hours.      As to the learning of scientific method, the whole thing is palpably 25 a farce. Actually, for the convenience of teachers and the      requirements of the examination system, it is necessary that the      pupils not only do not learn scientific method but learn precisely      the reverse, that is, to believe exactly what they are told and to      reproduce it when asked, whether it seems nonsense to them or 30 not. The way in which educated people respond to such quackeries      as spiritualism or astrology, not to say more dangerous ones such      as racial theories or currency myths, shows that fifty years of      education in the method of science in Britain or Germany has      produced no visible effect whatever. The only way of learning the 35 method of science is the long and bitter way of personal      experience, and, until the educational or social systems are altered      to make this possible, the best we can expect is the production of a      minority of people who are able to acquire some of the techniques      of science and a still smaller minority who are able to use and 40 develop them. Adapted from: The Social Function of Science, John D Bernal (1939)
  • 3. 
    The passage is taken from a biography of Florence Nightingale who is mainly remembered for her heroic work as a nurse during the Crimean War.       The name of Florence Nightingale lives in the memory of the       world by virtue of the heroic adventure of the Crimea. Had she       died - as she nearly did - upon her return to England, her       reputation would hardly have been different; her legend would 5    have come down to us almost as we know it today - that gentle       vision of female virtue which first took shape before the adoring       eyes of the sick soldiers at Scutari. Yet, as a matter of fact, she       lived for more than half a century after the Crimean War; and       during the greater part of that long period all the energy and all the 10  devotion of her extraordinary nature were working at their       highest pitch. What she accomplished in those years of unknown       labor could, indeed, hardly have been more glorious than her       Crimean triumphs; but it was certainly more important. The true       history was far stranger even than the myth. In Miss Nightingale's 15  own eyes the adventure of the Crimea was a mere incident -       scarcely more than a useful stepping-stone in her career. It was the       fulcrum with which she hoped to move the world; but it was       only the fulcrum. For more than a generation she was to sit in       secret, working her lever: and her real life began at the very 20  moment when, in popular imagination, it had ended.       She arrived in England in a shattered state of health. The       hardships and the ceaseless efforts of the last two years had       undermined her nervous system; her heart was affected; she       suffered constantly from fainting-fits and terrible attacks of utter 25  physical prostration. The doctors declared that one thing alone       would save her - a complete and prolonged rest. But that was also       the one thing with which she would have nothing to do. She had       never been in the habit of resting; why should she begin now?       Now, when her opportunity had come at last; now, when the iron 30  was hot, and it was time to strike? No; she had work to do; and,       come what might, she would do it. The doctors protested in vain;       in vain her family lamented and entreated, in vain her friends       pointed out to her the madness of such a course. Madness? Mad -       possessed - perhaps she was. A frenzy had seized upon her. As 35  she lay upon her sofa, gasping, she devoured blue-books, dictated       letters, and, in the intervals of her palpitations, cracked jokes. For       months at a stretch she never left her bed. But she would not rest.       At this rate, the doctors assured her, even if she did not die, she       would become an invalid for life. She could not help that; there 40  was work to be done; and, as for rest, very likely she might rest ...       when she had done it.       Wherever she went, to London or in the country, in the hills       of Derbyshire, or among the rhododendrons at Embley, she was       haunted by a ghost. It was the specter of Scutari - the hideous 45  vision of the organization of a military hospital. She would lay that       phantom, or she would perish. The whole system of the       Army Medical Department, the education of the Medical Officer,       the regulations of hospital procedure ... rest? How could she rest       while these things were as they were, while, if the like necessity 50  were to arise again, the like results would follow? And, even in       peace and at home, what was the sanitary condition of the Army?       The mortality in the barracks, was, she found, nearly double the       mortality in civil life. 'You might as well take 1, 100 men every       year out upon Salisbury Plain and shoot them,' she said. After 55  inspecting the hospitals at Chatham, she smiled grimly. 'Yes, this       is one more symptom of the system which, in the Crimea, put to       death 16,000 men.' Scutari had given her knowledge; and it had       given her power too: her enormous reputation was at her back -       an incalculable force. Other work, other duties, might lie before 60  her; but the most urgent, the most obvious, of all was to look to       the health of the Army. Adapted from: Eminent Victorians, Lytton Strachey (1918)
  • 4. 
    SAT Essay Prompt: To what extent do the various media (television, radio, newspaper, etc.) influence people? Answer in area provided below.
  • 5. 
    If x, y and z are three consecutive odd integers such that 10< x < y < z< 20 and if y and z are prime numbers, what is the value of x + y?
    • A. 

      24

    • B. 

      27

    • C. 

      19

    • D. 

      32

    • E. 

      15

  • 6. 
    If p > 0, which of the following is equal to √48p3
    • A. 

      4p√3p

    • B. 

      3p√4p

    • C. 

      2√12p

    • D. 

      3√8p

    • E. 

      16p√3p

  • 7. 
    If 40% of x is equal to 30% of y, what % is x of y?
    • A. 

      50%

    • B. 

      75%

    • C. 

      175%

    • D. 

      20%

    • E. 

      40%

  • 8. 
    If 4(3x - 3) = 24, what is 5x - 5?
    • A. 

      10

    • B. 

      6

    • C. 

      24

    • D. 

      3

    • E. 

      4

  • 9. 
    The average of 11 numbers is 21 . The average of seven of those numbers is 25. What is the average of the remaining four numbers?
    • A. 

      4

    • B. 

      12

    • C. 

      14

    • D. 

      21

    • E. 

      25

  • 10. 
    Which of the following is equivalent to 6x 2 + x - 12 ?
    • A. 

      (2x + 3)(3x - 4)

    • B. 

      (2x - 3)(3x - 4)

    • C. 

      (2x + 3)(3x + 4)

    • D. 

      (6x + 3)(x - 12)

    • E. 

      (x + 3)(2x - 12)

  • 11. 
    • A. 

      81

    • B. 

      40

    • C. 

      72

    • D. 

      9

    • E. 

      18

  • 12. 
    If 2 dots are equal to 3 dashes and 5 dashes equal to 7 stars, what is the ratio of one dot to one star?
    • A. 

      10 ⁄ 21

    • B. 

      3 ⁄ 5

    • C. 

      5 ⁄ 3

    • D. 

      21 ⁄ 10

    • E. 

      2 ⁄ 3

  • 13. 
    A social welfare organization spends 40% of the funds collected towards old-age homes. If during an year 1.6 million dollars was spent on old-age homes, what is the total amount of funds collected in millions of dollars?
    • A. 

      4.0

    • B. 

      6.0

    • C. 

      4.6

    • D. 

      40.0

    • E. 

      1.6

  • 14. 
    In the given figure, Note: Figure not drawn to scale.
    • A. 

      130 degrees

    • B. 

      90 degrees

    • C. 

      100 degrees

    • D. 

      30 degrees

    • E. 

      160 degrees

  • 15. 
    Solve for x: 
    • A. 

      12 < x < 13

    • B. 

      -12 < x < -13

    • C. 

      -5 < x < -5

    • D. 

      -25 < x < 25

    • E. 

      -12 < x < 13

  • 16. 
    A car travels a distance of 250 miles, 700 miles and 325 miles at the rate of 50 miles/hr, 35 miles/hr and 13 miles/hr respectively.Find the average speed of the car in miles/hr.
    • A. 

      30

    • B. 

      25.5

    • C. 

      42.5

    • D. 

      13

    • E. 

      50

  • 17. 
    By which of the following number is 98765432 exactly divisible?
    • A. 

      9

    • B. 

      7

    • C. 

      5

    • D. 

      8

    • E. 

      11

  • 18. 
    In a class of 30 students, 14 take tea and 20 take coffee. How many take both tea and coffee?
    • A. 

      16

    • B. 

      10

    • C. 

      14

    • D. 

      30

    • E. 

      4

  • 19. 
    In the given figure, area of square ABED is 9 square units, BC = 5 units, EF = 1 unit. Find the area of the rectangle BCGF. 
    • A. 

      25 square units

    • B. 

      30 square units

    • C. 

      36 square units

    • D. 

      20 square units

    • E. 

      15 square units

  • 20. 
    If y2 = c, where y and c are integers, which of the following could be the value of c?
    • A. 

      45

    • B. 

      17

    • C. 

      64

    • D. 

      34

    • E. 

      10

  • 21. 
    In a store  
    • A. 

      15

    • B. 

      24

    • C. 

      150

    • D. 

      100

    • E. 

      240

  • 22. 
    Each month for 6 months the price of a commodity is doubled. At the end of the 6 months the price of the commodity is $640. What was the price of the commodity at the end of 3 months?
    • A. 

      $100

    • B. 

      $120

    • C. 

      $80

    • D. 

      $320

    • E. 

      $160

  • 23. 
    Alda can complete a test in  .
    • A. 

      N

    • B. 

      Ab

    • C. 

      Nab

    • D. 

      A

    • E. 

      B

  • 24. 
    An operation * is defined as follows: For any two positive numbers x and y,
    • A. 

      11 * 4

    • B. 

      4 * 9

    • C. 

      4 * 16

    • D. 

      7 * 4

    • E. 

      9 * 9

  • 25. 
    If x2y > 0 and xy2 < 0,then which of the following are true?  
    • A. 

      A. x = 0

    • B. 

      B. y = 0

    • C. 

      C. x > 0 and y < 0

    • D. 

      D. x < 0 and y > 0

    • E. 

      E. x > 0 and y > 0

Related Topics
Back to Top Back to top