Quiz On Salome By Carol Ann Duffy

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 271

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Quiz On Salome By Carol Ann Duffy

Do you like the poem, Salome by Carol Ann Duffy? Do you know when was Salome written? Why did Salome want John's head in this dramatic monologue? This quiz tests your understanding of Carol Ann Duffy's poem 'Salome'.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Whose head is on Salome's platter?
    • A. 

      Herod Antipas

    • B. 

      Herodias

    • C. 

      John the Baptist

    • D. 

      Saint Peter

  • 2. 
    What is the form of the poem 'Salome'?
    • A. 

      Sonnet

    • B. 

      Monologue

    • C. 

      Lyric

    • D. 

      Epic

  • 3. 
    Which tecnhique did Duffy use when she ran her sentences over from one line of verse to another?
    • A. 

      Enjambment

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Alliteration

  • 4. 
    Which of the following is an example of how 'Salome' uses colloquialisms (informal regional speech)?
    • A. 

      'her innocent clatter'

    • B. 

      'a night on the batter'

    • C. 

      'tea, dry toast, no butter'

    • D. 

      'Simon? Andrew? John?'

  • 5. 
    Why did Duffy choose to use the names Simon, Andrew and John for potential past lovers of Salome's?
    • A. 

      These common names suggest common behaviour

    • B. 

      These names are all the names of friends of Duffy

    • C. 

      These names are all the names of famous politicians in Duffy's time

    • D. 

      These name all have Biblical origins, like Salome

  • 6. 
    What does Salome want to 'cut out'?
    • A. 

      Killing, sex and dancing

    • B. 

      Booze, cigarettes and sex

    • C. 

      Over-eating, hangovers and men

    • D. 

      Simon, Andrew and John

  • 7. 
    What technique did Duffy use when she wrote 'the blighter, the beater and biter'?
    • A. 

      Allusion

    • B. 

      Assonance

    • C. 

      Alliteration

    • D. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 8. 
    Why did Salome say the man's lips were 'colder than pewter'?
    • A. 

      Pewter refers to the material of the platter his head was found on

    • B. 

      Pewter sounds like Peter, another disciple of Jesus

    • C. 

      It near rhymes with the lines before and after it

    • D. 

      Pewter is red, which goes with the blood on the sheets

  • 9. 
    What does the reader learn when Salome 'rang for the maid'?
    • A. 

      Salome's rich

    • B. 

      Salome's guilt contrasts with the maid's innocence

    • C. 

      The maid is the murderer

    • D. 

      The maid discovers the decapitated head

  • 10. 
    Does Salome feel remorse for what she's done?
    • A. 

      Yes

    • B. 

      No

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