ServSafe Certification: Food Safety Quiz

59 Questions | Total Attempts: 9273

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ServSafe Certification: Food Safety Quiz

Do you know that there is a strict way to handle food to prevent contamination before it reaches the final consumer? Waiters are the people that bring food to a customer and have some knowledge of food handling. Take the ServSafe practice questions to prepare for an upcoming exam and learn interesting facts about safe food handling.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A package of raw chicken breasts is left out at room temperature
    • A. 

      Time temp abuse

    • B. 

      Poor personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Cross contamination

  • 2. 
    A food handler sneezes on a salad
    • A. 

      Time temp abuse

    • B. 

      Poor personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Cross contamination

  • 3. 
    A food handler cooks a rare hamburger
    • A. 

      Time temp abuse

    • B. 

      Poor personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Cross contamination

  • 4. 
    A food handler scratches a cut, and then continues to make a sandwich
    • A. 

      Time temp abuse

    • B. 

      Poor personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Cross contamination

  • 5. 
    A food handler leaves the restroom without washing her hands
    • A. 

      Time temp abuse

    • B. 

      Poor personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Cross contamination

  • 6. 
    A food handler cuts up raw chicken. He then use the same knife to chop carrots for a salad.
    • A. 

      Time temp abuse

    • B. 

      Poor personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Cross contamination

  • 7. 
    Why are elderly people at a higher risk for food borne illnesses?
    • A. 

      Their immune systems have weakened with age

    • B. 

      They are more likely to spend time in a hospital

    • C. 

      Climb a tree

  • 8. 
    The three categories of food safety hazards are biological, physical, and
    • A. 

      Temporal

    • B. 

      Chemical

    • C. 

      Biological

  • 9. 
    For a food borne illness to be considered an "outbreak," a minimum of how many people must experience the same illness after eating the same food?
    • A. 

      1

    • B. 

      2

    • C. 

      20

  • 10. 
    The three keys to food safety are practicing good personal hygiene, preventing cross contamination, and
    • A. 

      Toxic metal leaching

    • B. 

      Time temperature control

    • C. 

      Thawing it out

  • 11. 
    According to the CDC, the five common causes for food borne illnesses are failing to cook food adequately, holding food at incorrect temperatures, using contaminated equipment, practicing poor personal hygiene, and
    • A. 

      Reheating leftover food

    • B. 

      Purchasing food from unsafe sources

    • C. 

      Cool it down

  • 12. 
    FATTOM stands for
    • A. 

      Food, Acidity, Temperature, Time, Oxygen, Moisture

    • B. 

      Food, Action, Temperature, Temporal, Oxygen, Mixture

    • C. 

      Food, Acidity, Temperature, Twitch, Orange, Moisture

  • 13. 
    Temperature danger zone is
    • A. 

      35* F- 145*F

    • B. 

      41*F- 135*F

    • C. 

      41*F- 145*F

  • 14. 
    Hemorrhagic colitis
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 15. 
    Neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP)
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 16. 
    Listeriosis
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 17. 
    Amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP)
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 18. 
    Vibrio vulnificus primary septicemia
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 19. 
    Staphylococcal gastroenteritis
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 20. 
    Norovirus gastroenteritis
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 21. 
    Salmonellosis
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 22. 
    Giardiasis
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 23. 
    Scombroid poisoning
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 24. 
    Shigellosis
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 25. 
    Bacillus cereus gastroenteritis
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

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