Identifying Premises And Conclusions

5 Questions | Total Attempts: 3549

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Philosophy Quizzes & Trivia

Quiz yourself on the terms and concepts you've learned in this section!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Arguments in ordinary language usually aren’t presented in standard form.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 2. 
    “There’s no way you’ll get the job. The job ad says you need a high school diploma to apply.” What premise is assumed, but not explicitly stated, in this argument?
    • A. 

      The job requires a high school diploma.

    • B. 

      You shouldn’t bother applying for the job.

    • C. 

      You don’t have a high school diploma.

  • 3. 
    “They’re letting that criminal go on account of a technicality in the search warrant. I think that’s just awful.”
    • A. 

      This is an argument, and the conclusion is “That’s just awful”.

    • B. 

      This is an argument, and the conclusion is “They’re letting that criminal go on account of a technicality in the search warrant”.

    • C. 

      This isn’t an argument, it’s just a pair of statements. Neither is being offered as a reason to believe the other.

  • 4. 
    “John is a high school teacher, so he probably has a university degree.” What premise is being assumed in this argument?
    • A. 

      All high school teachers have a university degree.

    • B. 

      Most high school teachers have a university degree.

    • C. 

      Most people with university degrees are high school teachers.

  • 5. 
    In ordinary language, the conclusion of an argument always comes after the premises.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

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