Blood Proteins Quiz

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Catherine Halcomb
Catherine Halcomb
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 1429 | Total Attempts: 6,106,751
Questions: 50 | Attempts: 1,256

SettingsSettingsSettings
Blood Proteins Quiz - Quiz

Blood proteins, also termed plasma proteins, are proteins present in blood plasma. They serve many different functions, including the transport of lipids, hormones, vitamins, and minerals in the activity and functioning of the immune system.
Check out our online quiz and know more about them with every question you attempt!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    When coagulation occurs, and the blood clot is separated from the liquid portion of blood, it is called:

    • A.

      Serum

    • B.

      Plasma

    Correct Answer
    A. Serum
    Explanation
    When coagulation occurs, and the blood clot is separated from the liquid portion of blood, it is called "serum." Serum is the clear, yellowish fluid that is left after the blood has clotted and the clot has been removed. It contains various proteins, electrolytes, hormones, and waste products. Plasma, on the other hand, is the liquid component of blood that contains clotting factors and other substances necessary for blood clotting. Therefore, the correct answer is serum.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    Does not contain FIBRINOGEN & other clotting factors

    • A.

      Plasma

    • B.

      Serum

    Correct Answer
    B. Serum
    Explanation
    Serum is the correct answer because it is the liquid component of blood that remains after the blood has clotted and the clotting factors, including fibrinogen, have been removed. Unlike plasma, which contains fibrinogen and other clotting factors, serum does not have these components. Therefore, the absence of fibrinogen and other clotting factors makes serum the appropriate answer in this context.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    PLASMA PROTEINS Total conc. = ________

    Correct Answer
    6-8 g/dl
    Explanation
    The total concentration of plasma proteins is typically measured in grams per deciliter (g/dl). The normal range for plasma protein concentration is 6-8 g/dl.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    Proteins can be separate out by

    • A.

      Salting out process

    • B.

      Electrophoresis

    • C.

      All the above

    Correct Answer
    C. All the above
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "all the above" because both the salting out process and electrophoresis are commonly used methods to separate proteins. The salting out process involves adding a high concentration of salt to a protein solution, causing the proteins to precipitate out. Electrophoresis, on the other hand, separates proteins based on their size and charge using an electric field. Therefore, both methods can be used individually or in combination to separate proteins effectively.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    The conc. of each fraction / bands seen in serum protein electrophoresis can be estimated by a densitometer

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The statement is true because a densitometer is a device used to measure the density or concentration of substances in a solution. In the context of serum protein electrophoresis, a densitometer can be used to estimate the concentration of each fraction or band seen in the electrophoresis gel. This allows for quantitative analysis of the protein fractions and helps in diagnosing various medical conditions.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    What are the different bands seen in serum protein electrophoresis?

    • A.

      Albumin

    • B.

      α 1

    • C.

      α 2

    • D.

      β & γ globulins

    • E.

      All the above

    Correct Answer
    E. All the above
    Explanation
    The different bands seen in serum protein electrophoresis are albumin, α1, α2, β, and γ globulins. Albumin is the most abundant protein in the blood and appears as a single band. The α1 and α2 bands represent different types of alpha globulins, while the β and γ bands represent beta and gamma globulins, respectively. Therefore, the correct answer is "all the above," as all of these bands can be observed in serum protein electrophoresis.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    Albumin/ globulin ratio

    • A.

      1.2 – 1.5 : 1

    • B.

      2.1 – 1.5 : 1

    Correct Answer
    A. 1.2 – 1.5 : 1
    Explanation
    The albumin/globulin ratio refers to the ratio of albumin to globulin proteins in the blood. A normal range for this ratio is 1.2 - 1.5 : 1. This means that there should be slightly more albumin than globulin in the blood. This ratio is important as it can provide information about liver function, kidney function, and overall protein status in the body. If the ratio is significantly higher or lower than the normal range, it may indicate certain medical conditions or diseases.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    A/ G ration is lowered due to a decrease in albumin or increase in globulins

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    A decrease in albumin or an increase in globulins can both contribute to a lowered A/G ratio. Albumin is a protein produced by the liver and helps maintain osmotic pressure in the blood. Globulins are a group of proteins that include antibodies and transport proteins. When there is a decrease in albumin or an increase in globulins, the ratio of albumin to globulins (A/G ratio) decreases. This can be seen in conditions such as liver disease, kidney disease, or certain autoimmune disorders. Therefore, the statement is true.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    Albumin is the Major constituent of plasma proteins (60%)

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Albumin is indeed the major constituent of plasma proteins, accounting for approximately 60% of the total protein content in the plasma. It is synthesized in the liver and plays a crucial role in maintaining the osmotic pressure of the blood, transporting various substances such as hormones, fatty acids, and drugs, and contributing to the regulation of pH and buffering capacity. Therefore, the statement "Albumin is the Major constituent of plasma proteins (60%)" is true.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    ½ life of ALBUMIN is

    • A.

      20 days

    • B.

      30 days

    • C.

      40 days

    • D.

      10 days

    Correct Answer
    A. 20 days
    Explanation
    The half-life of albumin is 20 days. This means that it takes approximately 20 days for half of the albumin in the body to be broken down and eliminated. The remaining half will take another 20 days to be further reduced. This information is important in medical settings as it helps determine the dosing and frequency of medication administration, as well as assessing the overall health and functioning of the liver and kidneys.

    Rate this question:

  • 11. 

    Globulin is therapeutically useful for the treatment of burns & hemorrhage

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Globulin is a type of protein found in the blood that plays a role in the immune system. While it may have some therapeutic uses, such as in the treatment of certain immune disorders, burns and hemorrhage are not among them. Therefore, the statement that globulin is therapeutically useful for the treatment of burns and hemorrhage is false.

    Rate this question:

  • 12. 

    Microalbuminuria (30-300 mg/day) is clinically important for predicting the future risk of renal diseases

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Microalbuminuria refers to the presence of a small amount of albumin (a protein) in the urine, typically between 30-300 mg/day. This condition is clinically important because it serves as an early marker for kidney damage. It is often an indication of early-stage kidney disease or a precursor to more severe renal diseases, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD) or diabetic nephropathy. By detecting microalbuminuria, healthcare professionals can identify individuals at a higher risk of developing kidney diseases and take appropriate measures to prevent or manage the condition. Therefore, the statement that microalbuminuria is clinically important for predicting the future risk of renal diseases is true.

    Rate this question:

  • 13. 

    What is the normal concentration of albumin in the serum? ________

    Correct Answer
    3.5 – 5 g/dl
    Explanation
    The normal concentration of albumin in the serum is 3.5 – 5 g/dl.

    Rate this question:

  • 14. 

    Liver do not synthesize which major class of plasma proteins?

    • A.

      Albumin

    • B.

      Haptoglobulin

    • C.

      Gamma globulin

    • D.

      TRANSFERRIN

    Correct Answer
    C. Gamma globulin
    Explanation
    The liver is responsible for synthesizing many major classes of plasma proteins, including albumin, haptoglobulin, and transferrin. However, it does not synthesize gamma globulin, which is primarily produced by plasma cells in the lymphoid tissues, such as the bone marrow and lymph nodes. Gamma globulin is an important component of the immune system and plays a role in antibody production.

    Rate this question:

  • 15. 

    What is the most abundant alpha-1-globulin?

    • A.

      Alpha-1-antiprotease (AKA antitrypsin

    • B.

      α2-Macroglobin

    • C.

      HAPTOGLOBIN (Hp)

    • D.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    A. Alpha-1-antiprotease (AKA antitrypsin
  • 16. 

    What is function of Alpha- anti proteinase?

    • A.

      It combines with trypsin, elastase & other protease enzyme & inhibits their activity

    • B.

      Prevents the loss of free Hb into urine

    • C.

      A transporter of iron in the circulation

    Correct Answer
    A. It combines with trypsin, elastase & other protease enzyme & inhibits their activity
    Explanation
    Alpha-anti proteinase is a protein that functions by combining with trypsin, elastase, and other protease enzymes to inhibit their activity. This helps regulate the activity of these enzymes and prevent them from causing excessive tissue damage. By inhibiting their activity, alpha-anti proteinase helps maintain the balance between protease activity and tissue integrity.

    Rate this question:

  • 17. 

    What is the clinical result of Alpha- anti proteinase absence or non-functioning?

    • A.

      Inflammatory conditions

    • B.

      EMPHYSEMA– abnormal distention of lungs by air and liver damage (hepatitis)

    • C.

      Hemolytic anemia

    Correct Answer
    B. EMPHYSEMA– abnormal distention of lungs by air and liver damage (hepatitis)
  • 18. 

    A non- specific response to the stimulus of infection, injury , various inflammatory conditions, cancer, etc is referred to as

    • A.

      Multiple myeloma

    • B.

      Acute phase response

    • C.

      Wilson disease

    • D.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    B. Acute phase response
    Explanation
    Acute phase response is a non-specific response of the body to various stimuli such as infection, injury, inflammation, and cancer. It is characterized by the release of certain proteins called acute phase proteins, which help in the regulation of the immune response and tissue repair. This response is a part of the body's defense mechanism and is triggered by the activation of the immune system. Multiple myeloma and Wilson disease are specific medical conditions and are not related to the non-specific response known as acute phase response.

    Rate this question:

  • 19. 

    All the following are acute phase protein, except

    • A.

      Antitrypsin

    • B.

      Ceroplasmin

    • C.

      Complement proteins

    • D.

      CRP

    • E.

      Albumin

    Correct Answer
    E. Albumin
    Explanation
    Acute phase proteins are a group of proteins that are produced by the liver in response to inflammation or infection. These proteins help in various immune and inflammatory processes. Antitrypsin, ceruloplasmin, complement proteins, and C-reactive protein (CRP) are all examples of acute phase proteins. However, albumin is not an acute phase protein. It is the most abundant protein in the blood and is involved in maintaining osmotic pressure and transporting various substances.

    Rate this question:

  • 20. 

    During the acute phase, synthesis of certain plasma proteins decreases. These proteins are referred to as negative (-ve) acute phase reactants and includes 

    • A.

      Albumin and transferrin

    • B.

      Albumin and globulin

    • C.

      Ceruloplasmin and albumin

    • D.

      Transferrin and haptoglobin

    Correct Answer
    A. Albumin and transferrin
    Explanation
    During the acute phase, certain plasma proteins, such as albumin and transferrin, decrease in synthesis. These proteins are referred to as negative acute phase reactants because their levels decrease during inflammation or infection. Albumin is an important protein that helps maintain osmotic pressure in the blood and transports various substances, while transferrin is responsible for transporting iron in the blood. A decrease in their synthesis during the acute phase can be attributed to the body's response to inflammation or infection.

    Rate this question:

  • 21. 

    Reference range of high sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) is ________

    Correct Answer
    100-300 ug/ dl
    Explanation
    The reference range of high sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) is 100-300 ug/dl. This range indicates the normal levels of hs-CRP in the blood. It is used as a marker of inflammation in the body, with higher levels suggesting a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, a hs-CRP level within the range of 100-300 ug/dl is considered normal and indicates a lower risk of inflammation-related health issues.

    Rate this question:

  • 22. 

    Estimation of CRP in serum is IMP for the evaluation of acute phase response

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The estimation of CRP (C-reactive protein) in serum is important for evaluating the acute phase response. CRP is a protein produced by the liver in response to inflammation, infection, or tissue injury. It is a marker of inflammation and its levels can increase significantly during the acute phase response. Measuring CRP levels in serum can help in diagnosing and monitoring various inflammatory conditions such as infections, autoimmune diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, it is crucial to estimate CRP in serum for a comprehensive evaluation of the acute phase response.

    Rate this question:

  • 23. 

    Increase levels of high sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) in the circulation are useful for predicting risk of coronary heart disease

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Increased levels of high sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) in the circulation have been found to be associated with inflammation in the body. Inflammation plays a crucial role in the development and progression of coronary heart disease (CHD). Therefore, measuring hs-CRP levels can be a useful tool in predicting the risk of CHD. Higher levels of hs-CRP indicate a higher risk of developing CHD, while lower levels suggest a lower risk. This information can help healthcare professionals identify individuals who may benefit from preventive measures and interventions to reduce their risk of CHD.

    Rate this question:

  • 24. 

    LDH is Present in ALL cells of the body ~ only in the CYTOPLASM of the cell

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    LDH, or lactate dehydrogenase, is an enzyme that is present in all cells of the body. It is responsible for the conversion of lactate to pyruvate during the process of glycolysis. LDH is located in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it carries out its function. Therefore, the statement that LDH is present in all cells of the body and only in the cytoplasm of the cell is true.

    Rate this question:

  • 25. 

    LD-1 & LD-2 predominate

    • A.

      Liver & skeletal muscle

    • B.

      Cardiac muscle, kidneys & erythrocytes

    Correct Answer
    B. Cardiac muscle, kidneys & erythrocytes
    Explanation
    The given correct answer, "Cardiac muscle, kidneys & erythrocytes," suggests that LD-1 and LD-2 predominates in these specific organs and cells. This means that these organs and cells have a higher concentration of LD-1 and LD-2 isoenzymes compared to other organs, such as the liver and skeletal muscle.

    Rate this question:

  • 26. 

    LD-4 & LD-5 predominate

    • A.

      Cardiac muscle, kidneys & erythrocytes

    • B.

      Liver & skeletal muscle

    Correct Answer
    B. Liver & skeletal muscle
    Explanation
    LD-4 and LD-5 are subunits of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). LD-4 is predominantly found in the liver, while LD-5 is predominantly found in skeletal muscle. This means that the highest levels of LDH activity in the body would be found in the liver and skeletal muscle. Cardiac muscle, kidneys, and erythrocytes may also have some LDH activity, but it is not as predominant as in the liver and skeletal muscle. Therefore, the correct answer is liver and skeletal muscle.

    Rate this question:

  • 27. 

    Spleen, lungs, lymph nodes, leukocytes & platelets - isoenzyme of intermediate mobility ??

    • A.

      LDH-1

    • B.

      LDH-2

    • C.

      LDH-3

    • D.

      LDH-4

    Correct Answer
    C. LDH-3
    Explanation
    LDH-3 is the correct answer because it is the isoenzyme of intermediate mobility. LDH, or lactate dehydrogenase, is an enzyme found in various tissues including the spleen, lungs, lymph nodes, leukocytes, and platelets. It exists in different forms, or isoenzymes, which can be separated based on their mobility during electrophoresis. LDH-3 refers to the specific isoenzyme that has intermediate mobility, meaning it moves at a moderate rate during electrophoresis.

    Rate this question:

  • 28. 

    Which of the following subunits and its location represents LDH

    • A.

      B – CHROMOSOME 14  

    • B.

      M- CHROMOSOME 19

    • C.

      M (A) -muscle –chromosome 11  

    • D.

      H (B) -heart – chromosome 12

    Correct Answer(s)
    C. M (A) -muscle –chromosome 11  
    D. H (B) -heart – chromosome 12
  • 29. 

    Which of the following ATYPICAL forms of CPK is gene is found on chromosome 15 and is located btw the inner & outer membranes of mitochondria

    • A.

      Macro CK

    • B.

      CK-1

    • C.

      CK-Mt

    • D.

      Oligomeric CK-Mt

    Correct Answer
    C. CK-Mt
    Explanation
    The correct answer is CK-Mt. CK-Mt refers to Creatine Kinase-Mitochondrial, which is an atypical form of CPK (Creatine Phosphokinase). This specific gene is found on chromosome 15 and is located between the inner and outer membranes of mitochondria. CK-Mt is involved in the transfer of high-energy phosphate groups from ATP to creatine, which is important for energy metabolism in the mitochondria.

    Rate this question:

  • 30. 

    According to accepted nomenclature, the CK isoenzyme migrating closest to the anode (+ terminal) should be referred to as:

    • A.

      Brain-type CK

    • B.

      CK-3

    • C.

      CK-1

    • D.

      CK-BB

    Correct Answer
    C. CK-1
    Explanation
    According to accepted nomenclature, the CK isoenzyme migrating closest to the anode (+ terminal) should be referred to as CK-1.

    Rate this question:

  • 31. 

    In cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH8.6, migration of serum proteins towards the anode will appear as follows:

    • A.

      +) albumin, alpha-1 globulin, alpha-2 globulin, beta globulin, gamma globulin (-)

    • B.

      +) alpha-1 globulin, alpha-2 globulin, beta globulin, gamma globulin, albumin (-)

    • C.

      +) albumin, alpha-2 globulin, alpha-1 globulin, beta globulin, gamma globulin (-)

    • D.

      +) gamma globulin, beta globulin, alpha-2 globulin, alpha-1 globulin, albumin (-)

    Correct Answer
    A. +) albumin, alpha-1 globulin, alpha-2 globulin, beta globulin, gamma globulin (-)
    Explanation
    In cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH 8.6, serum proteins migrate towards the anode based on their net charge. At this pH, albumin has the highest negative charge and will migrate the fastest towards the anode. Alpha-1 globulin, alpha-2 globulin, beta globulin, and gamma globulin have progressively lower negative charges and will migrate in that order towards the anode. Therefore, the correct answer is "+) albumin, alpha-1 globulin, alpha-2 globulin, beta globulin, gamma globulin (-)".

    Rate this question:

  • 32. 

    In electrophoresis of serum proteins, when the sample is placed in an electric field connected to a buffer of pH8.6, all proteins:

    • A.

       have a positive charge

    • B.

      Have a negative charge

    • C.

      Are electrically neutral

    • D.

      Migrate towards the cathode

    Correct Answer
    B. Have a negative charge
    Explanation
    In electrophoresis of serum proteins, when the sample is placed in an electric field connected to a buffer of pH 8.6, the proteins have a negative charge. This is because at pH 8.6, the amino acid residues in the proteins become deprotonated, resulting in a net negative charge. This negative charge causes the proteins to migrate towards the positively charged anode (not the cathode as stated in the question), as opposites attract in an electric field.

    Rate this question:

  • 33. 

     patient is admitted with bone pain and multiple myeloma is diagnosed. When the serum protein electrophoresis is performed, which of the following fractions will most likely be most elevated?

    • A.

      Beta

    • B.

      Alpha-1

    • C.

      Alpha-2

    • D.

      Gamma

    Correct Answer
    D. Gamma
    Explanation
    In multiple myeloma, there is an abnormal proliferation of plasma cells in the bone marrow, leading to the production of excessive amounts of monoclonal immunoglobulins (M proteins). These M proteins can be detected in the serum protein electrophoresis. The gamma fraction represents the immunoglobulins, including the M proteins, and is typically elevated in patients with multiple myeloma. Therefore, in this case, the gamma fraction is most likely to be the most elevated.

    Rate this question:

  • 34. 

    Which of the following migration patterns towards the anode correctly describes the migration of CK and LD isoenzymes in electrophoretic separation?

    • A.

      CK1, CK2, CK3

    • B.

      CK3, CK2, CK1

    • C.

      LD1, LD2, LD3, LD4, LD5

    • D.

      LD5, LD4, LD3, LD2, LD1

    • E.

      A and C

    • F.

      B and D

    Correct Answer
    F. B and D
    Explanation
    The migration pattern of CK and LD isoenzymes in electrophoretic separation is described by options B and D. This means that CK3, CK2, CK1 and LD5, LD4, LD3, LD2, LD1 migrate towards the anode during electrophoresis.

    Rate this question:

  • 35. 

    Which of the following atypical forms of CK is Found transiently in sera (up to 6 %) of hospitalized patients

    • A.

      Macro CK

    • B.

      CK-Mt

    Correct Answer
    A. Macro CK
    Explanation
    Macro CK is an atypical form of creatine kinase that is found transiently in the sera of hospitalized patients. It can be detected in up to 6% of these patients. Macro CK refers to the presence of high molecular weight forms of CK in the blood, which can be caused by various factors such as autoimmune diseases, liver diseases, or malignancies. This form of CK is not specific to any particular condition and its presence in hospitalized patients is likely due to the underlying health issues they are experiencing.

    Rate this question:

  • 36. 

    Both M & B subunits have a C-terminal lysine residue, but only the B subunit is hydrolyze by carboxypeptidases present in blood

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Both M and B subunits have a C-terminal lysine residue, which suggests that both subunits could potentially be hydrolyzed by carboxypeptidases present in blood. Therefore, the statement that only the B subunit is hydrolyzed by carboxypeptidases is incorrect.

    Rate this question:

  • 37. 

    Serum activity of which of the following is greatly elevated in MUSCULAR DYSTROpHY

    • A.

      LDH

    • B.

      CPK

    • C.

      ALP

    Correct Answer
    B. CPK
    Explanation
    Muscular dystrophy is a group of genetic disorders characterized by progressive muscle weakness and degeneration. Creatine kinase (CPK) is an enzyme found in muscle cells, and its levels in the blood are greatly elevated in muscular dystrophy. This is because the muscle cells are damaged and CPK leaks into the bloodstream. Therefore, the correct answer is CPK.

    Rate this question:

Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Sep 17, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Apr 20, 2021
    Quiz Created by
    Catherine Halcomb
Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.