Blood Types And Transfusion Quiz Questions

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Blood Types And Transfusion Quiz Questions - Quiz


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Which of the following statements about blood is FALSE?

    • A.

      Contains buffers that control pH

    • B.

      Is about 55 percent plasma

    • C.

      Normal pH is 6.8 to 7.0

    • D.

      Is more viscous than water

    • E.

      None of the above is false- all are true

    Correct Answer
    C. Normal pH is 6.8 to 7.0
    Explanation
    Blood does not have a normal pH of 6.8 to 7.0. The normal pH range of blood is slightly alkaline, ranging from 7.35 to 7.45. This is important for maintaining homeostasis and ensuring proper functioning of various physiological processes in the body.

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  • 2. 

    Whole blood for testing in a clinical laboratory is usually collected from

    • A.

      A superficial artery

    • B.

      An arteriole

    • C.

      A capillary

    • D.

      A superficial vein

    • E.

      The heart

    Correct Answer
    D. A superficial vein
  • 3. 

    A plasma protein essential for blood coagulation is 

    • A.

      Metalloprotein D

    • B.

      Albumin alpha

    • C.

      Lipoprotein C

    • D.

      Fibrinogen

    • E.

      Immunoglobulin A

    Correct Answer
    D. Fibrinogen
    Explanation
    Fibrinogen is a plasma protein that is essential for blood coagulation. When there is an injury or damage to blood vessels, fibrinogen is converted to fibrin, which forms a mesh-like structure to trap platelets and form a blood clot. This clotting process helps to stop bleeding and promote wound healing. Fibrinogen plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of the circulatory system and preventing excessive blood loss.

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  • 4. 

    The average lifespan of a red blood cell is

    • A.

      24 hours

    • B.

      Many years

    • C.

      4 months

    • D.

      About 1 year

    • E.

      1 month

    Correct Answer
    C. 4 months
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 4 months. Red blood cells, also known as erythrocytes, have an average lifespan of around 120 days or 4 months. They are constantly being produced and replaced in the body by the bone marrow. This turnover is necessary to maintain a healthy level of oxygen-carrying cells in the bloodstream.

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  • 5. 

    The function of hemoglobin is to

    • A.

      Carry oxygen

    • B.

      Carry carbon dioxide

    • C.

      Aid in the process of blood clotting

    • D.

      A, B, and C

    • E.

      A and B only

    Correct Answer
    E. A and B only
    Explanation
    Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells that is responsible for carrying oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carrying carbon dioxide from the tissues back to the lungs. It does not aid in the process of blood clotting, which is primarily carried out by platelets and clotting factors. Therefore, the correct answer is A and B only, as hemoglobin's function is to carry oxygen and carbon dioxide.

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  • 6. 

    A person's blood type is determined largely by the

    • A.

      Volume of the RBCs

    • B.

      Chemical character of the hemoglobin

    • C.

      Presence of specific glycoproteins on the cell membrane

    • D.

      Size of the RBCs

    • E.

      Shape of the RBCs

    Correct Answer
    C. Presence of specific glycoproteins on the cell membrane
    Explanation
    The presence of specific glycoproteins on the cell membrane determines a person's blood type. These glycoproteins act as antigens that can trigger an immune response if they are recognized as foreign by the body. The different blood types, such as A, B, AB, and O, are determined by the specific types of glycoproteins present on the red blood cells. For example, type A blood has A antigens, type B blood has B antigens, type AB blood has both A and B antigens, and type O blood has neither A nor B antigens. This is why blood type compatibility is important for blood transfusions, as the presence of specific glycoproteins can cause an immune reaction if not matched correctly.

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  • 7. 

    All of the following are true of neutrophils, EXCEPT that they are 

    • A.

      Active in fighting bacterial infections

    • B.

      Also known as polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    • C.

      Phagocytic

    • D.

      Important in coagulation

    • E.

      Granular leukocytes

    Correct Answer
    D. Important in coagulation
    Explanation
    Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that play a crucial role in the immune response against bacterial infections. They are also known as polymorphonuclear leukocytes due to their multi-lobed nucleus. Neutrophils are phagocytic, meaning they can engulf and destroy bacteria. They are granular leukocytes, as they contain granules filled with enzymes and chemicals that aid in their antimicrobial activity. However, neutrophils are not important in coagulation. Coagulation refers to the process of blood clotting, which involves platelets and various clotting factors, but not neutrophils.

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  • 8. 

    __________ are large phagocytic white cells that spend most of their time outside the blood as fixed and free phagocytic cells.

    • A.

      Monocytes

    • B.

      Neutrophils

    • C.

      Eosinophils

    • D.

      Lymphocytes

    • E.

      Basophils

    Correct Answer
    A. Monocytes
    Explanation
    Monocytes are large phagocytic white cells that can be found both inside and outside the blood. They are able to migrate into tissues and transform into macrophages, which are specialized in engulfing and digesting pathogens. Monocytes are considered as fixed and free phagocytic cells because they can either remain in a fixed position in certain tissues or circulate freely in the blood, depending on the immune response requirements.

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  • 9. 

    Most of the protein factors that are required for clotting are synthesized by

    • A.

      The liver

    • B.

      The kidneys

    • C.

      The spleen

    • D.

      Megakaryoctes

    • E.

      Platelets

    Correct Answer
    A. The liver
    Explanation
    The liver is responsible for synthesizing most of the protein factors required for clotting. These protein factors play a crucial role in the clotting process by forming a mesh-like structure that helps in the formation of blood clots. The liver produces these factors and releases them into the bloodstream, where they can be activated when needed to initiate clotting. Without the liver's synthesis of these protein factors, the clotting process would be impaired, leading to difficulties in stopping bleeding and maintaining hemostasis.

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  • 10. 

    A moving blood clot is called a(n)

    • A.

      Thrombus

    • B.

      Platelet plug

    • C.

      Procoagulant

    • D.

      Embolus

    • E.

      Plaque

    Correct Answer
    D. Embolus
    Explanation
    An embolus is a moving blood clot that travels through the bloodstream and can block blood vessels. This can lead to serious health issues such as stroke or pulmonary embolism. The other options, thrombus, platelet plug, procoagulant, and plaque, are all related to blood clotting but do not specifically refer to a moving blood clot.

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  • 11. 

    Blood returning to the heart from the pulmonary circuit first enters the

    • A.

      Left ventricle

    • B.

      Left atrium

    • C.

      Right ventricle

    • D.

      Right atrium

    • E.

      Conus arteriosus

    Correct Answer
    B. Left atrium
    Explanation
    Blood returning to the heart from the pulmonary circuit first enters the left atrium. This is because after oxygenated blood is pumped from the lungs into the left atrium through the pulmonary veins, it then flows into the left ventricle for the next stage of circulation.

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  • 12. 

    The cusps (leaflets) of atrioventricular valves attach directly to

    • A.

      Interarterial septa

    • B.

      Papillary muscles

    • C.

      Trabeculae carneae

    • D.

      Chordae tendinae

    • E.

      Coronary sulci

    Correct Answer
    D. Chordae tendinae
    Explanation
    The cusps (leaflets) of atrioventricular valves attach directly to chordae tendinae. The chordae tendinae are thin, fibrous cords that connect the cusps of the valves to the papillary muscles in the ventricles of the heart. This connection helps to prevent the valves from inverting or prolapsing during ventricular contraction.

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  • 13. 

    Blood flowing into the heart from the venae cavae flows next through the _______ valve.

    • A.

      Tricuspid

    • B.

      Mitral

    • C.

      Bicuspid

    • D.

      Aortic semilunar

    • E.

      Pulmonary semilunar

    Correct Answer
    A. Tricuspid
    Explanation
    The blood flowing into the heart from the venae cavae flows next through the tricuspid valve. The tricuspid valve is located between the right atrium and the right ventricle. It consists of three flaps or cusps that open to allow blood to flow from the atrium to the ventricle, and close to prevent backflow of blood.

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  • 14. 

    The pulmonary semilunar valve prevents backward flow into the 

    • A.

      Pulmonary trunk

    • B.

      Aorta

    • C.

      Right ventricle

    • D.

      Pulmonary veins

    • E.

      Left atrium

    Correct Answer
    C. Right ventricle
    Explanation
    The pulmonary semilunar valve is located between the right ventricle and the pulmonary trunk. Its main function is to prevent the backward flow of blood from the pulmonary trunk into the right ventricle. This is important because it ensures that oxygenated blood from the lungs is only sent to the rest of the body through the aorta, rather than mixing with deoxygenated blood in the right ventricle.

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  • 15. 

    The following is a list of vessels and structures that are associated with the heart
    1. right atrium
    2. left atrium
    3. right ventricle
    4. left ventricle
    5. venae cavae
    6. aorta
    7. pulmonary trunk
    8. pulmonary veins
    What is the correct order for the flow ofg blood entering from the systemic circulation?

    • A.

      1,7,3,8,2,4,6,5

    • B.

      5,3,1,7,8,4,2,6

    • C.

      1,2,7,8,3,4,6,5

    • D.

      5,1,3,8,7,2,4,6

    • E.

      5,1,3,7,8,2,4,6

    Correct Answer
    E. 5,1,3,7,8,2,4,6
  • 16. 

    The long plateau phase of the cardiac muscle action potential is due to

    • A.

      Increased membrane permeability to potassium ion

    • B.

      Decrease in the amount of calcium diffusing across the membrane

    • C.

      Calcium channels remaining open

    • D.

      Movement of fewer sodium ions across the cell membrane

    • E.

      Increased membrane permeability to sodium ions

    Correct Answer
    C. Calcium channels remaining open
    Explanation
    During the plateau phase of the cardiac muscle action potential, the calcium channels remain open. This allows calcium ions to continue flowing into the cell, counteracting the repolarizing effect of potassium ions. The influx of calcium prolongs the depolarization phase, resulting in the extended plateau phase observed in the cardiac muscle action potential. This sustained depolarization is crucial for the proper contraction of the cardiac muscle and the coordination of the heart's pumping function.

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  • 17. 

    The following are structural components of the conducting system of the heart
    1. Purkinje fibers
    2. AV bundle
    3. AV node
    4. SA node
    5. Bundle branches

    • A.

      3,2,4,5,1

    • B.

      4,2,3,5,1

    • C.

      4,3,2,5,1

    • D.

      3,5,4,2,1

    • E.

      1,4,3,2,5

    Correct Answer
    C. 4,3,2,5,1
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 4,3,2,5,1. This is the correct order of the structural components of the conducting system of the heart. The SA node (sinoatrial node) is responsible for initiating the electrical impulses that regulate the heart's rhythm. The AV node (atrioventricular node) receives the impulses from the SA node and delays them before transmitting them to the ventricles. The AV bundle (also known as the bundle of His) carries the impulses from the AV node to the bundle branches. The bundle branches then distribute the impulses to the Purkinje fibers, which stimulate the contraction of the ventricles.

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  • 18. 

    The T wave on an ECG tracing represents

    • A.

      Atrial repolarization

    • B.

      Ventricular depolarization

    • C.

      Atrial depolarization

    • D.

      Ventricular repolarization

    • E.

      Ventricular contraction

    Correct Answer
    C. Atrial depolarization
    Explanation
    The correct answer is incorrect. The T wave on an ECG tracing represents ventricular repolarization, not atrial depolarization. Atrial depolarization is represented by the P wave, while ventricular depolarization is represented by the QRS complex. The T wave occurs after the QRS complex and indicates the repolarization of the ventricles.

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  • 19. 

    The first heart sound is heard when the

    • A.

      Atria contract

    • B.

      AV valves open

    • C.

      AV valves close

    • D.

      Semilunar valves close

    • E.

      Blood enters the aorta

    Correct Answer
    C. AV valves close
    Explanation
    The first heart sound is heard when the AV valves close. This occurs during ventricular systole, when the ventricles contract and push blood out of the heart. The closing of the AV valves prevents backflow of blood into the atria, ensuring that blood flows in the correct direction. This sound is often described as a "lub" sound and is the beginning of the cardiac cycle.

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  • 20. 

    The wall of the left ventricle is thicker than the right because

    • A.

      The left ventricle does more work than the right ventricle

    • B.

      The left ventricle pumps a greater volume of blood than the right ventricle

    • C.

      The left ventricle produces a higher presser than the right ventricle

    • D.

      Both A and B

    • E.

      Both A and C

    Correct Answer
    E. Both A and C
    Explanation
    The wall of the left ventricle is thicker than the right because the left ventricle does more work than the right ventricle and produces a higher pressure than the right ventricle. The left ventricle is responsible for pumping oxygenated blood to the rest of the body, while the right ventricle pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs. Since the left ventricle has to pump blood to the entire body, it needs to generate more force and pressure, resulting in a thicker wall.

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  • 21. 

    The muscular layer of a blood vessel is the

    • A.

      Tunica adventitia

    • B.

      Tunica externa

    • C.

      Tunica media

    • D.

      Tunica interna

    • E.

      Tunica intima

    Correct Answer
    C. Tunica media
    Explanation
    The muscular layer of a blood vessel is called the tunica media. This layer is responsible for regulating the diameter of the blood vessel and controlling blood flow. It contains smooth muscle cells that can contract and relax to adjust the vessel's diameter. The tunica media is located between the tunica externa (outer layer) and the tunica intima (inner layer) of the blood vessel.

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  • 22. 

    Compared to arteries, veins

    • A.

      Hold their shape better when cut

    • B.

      Have a pleated endothelium

    • C.

      Have thinner walls

    • D.

      Have a more smooth muscle in their tunica media

    • E.

      Are more elastic

    Correct Answer
    C. Have thinner walls
    Explanation
    Veins have thinner walls compared to arteries. This is because veins are responsible for carrying deoxygenated blood back to the heart from various parts of the body at a lower pressure. Thinner walls allow veins to expand and accommodate larger volumes of blood. In contrast, arteries carry oxygenated blood away from the heart at a higher pressure, requiring thicker and more muscular walls to withstand the force exerted by the blood flow.

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  • 23. 

    Arrange the structures in the following list in the order that blood will encounter as it flows from the output side to the input side of the cardiovascular flow circuit
    1. venules
    2. arterioles
    3. capillaries
    4. elastic arteries
    5. medium veins
    6. large veins
    7. muscular arteries

    • A.

      5,6,1,3,2,7,4

    • B.

      4,7,2,3,1,5,6

    • C.

      6,5,1,3,2,7,4

    • D.

      7,4,2,3,1,5,6

    • E.

      2,7,6,3,1,5,6

    Correct Answer
    B. 4,7,2,3,1,5,6
    Explanation
    Blood flows from the output side to the input side of the cardiovascular flow circuit in the following order: large veins, medium veins, muscular arteries, capillaries, arterioles, venules, and elastic arteries.

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  • 24. 

    Blood moves forward through veins because of all of the following, EXCEPT

    • A.

      Valves in the veins preventing the backward flow of blood

    • B.

      Muscular compression

    • C.

      The pressure in the veins is lower than in the arteries

    • D.

      Pumping by the smooth muscle in the wall of the vein

    • E.

      The respiratory pump

    Correct Answer
    D. Pumping by the smooth muscle in the wall of the vein
    Explanation
    The correct answer is pumping by the smooth muscle in the wall of the vein. While valves in the veins prevent the backward flow of blood, muscular compression, the pressure in the veins being lower than in the arteries, and the respiratory pump all contribute to the forward movement of blood through the veins. However, the smooth muscle in the wall of the vein does not have a pumping action like the heart does in the arteries.

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  • 25. 

    As blood travels from arteries to veins,

    • A.

      Pressure builds

    • B.

      Viscosity increases

    • C.

      Flow becomes turbulent

    • D.

      Diameter of the blood vessels gets progressively smaller

    • E.

      Pressure drops

    Correct Answer
    E. Pressure drops
    Explanation
    As blood travels from arteries to veins, the diameter of the blood vessels gets progressively smaller. This narrowing of the blood vessels leads to an increase in resistance to blood flow. As a result, the pressure exerted by the blood on the vessel walls decreases. This drop in pressure is necessary for the blood to flow smoothly through the capillaries and return to the heart.

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  • 26. 

    Blood pressure increases with all of the following, EXCEPT increased

    • A.

      Peripheral resistance

    • B.

      Viscosity increases

    • C.

      Flow becomes turbulent

    • D.

      Diameter of the blood vessels gets progressively smaller

    • E.

      Pressure drops

    Correct Answer
    D. Diameter of the blood vessels gets progressively smaller
    Explanation
    Blood pressure is the force exerted by the blood against the walls of the blood vessels. When the diameter of the blood vessels gets progressively smaller, it leads to increased resistance to blood flow, which in turn increases blood pressure. Therefore, the statement that blood pressure increases with the diameter of the blood vessels getting progressively smaller is incorrect.

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  • 27. 

    Pulmonary veins carry blood to the

    • A.

      Lungs

    • B.

      Aorta

    • C.

      Left atrium

    • D.

      Right atrium

    • E.

      Pulmonary circuit

    Correct Answer
    C. Left atrium
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the left atrium. The pulmonary veins are responsible for carrying oxygenated blood from the lungs back to the heart. Specifically, they deliver this blood to the left atrium, which is one of the four chambers of the heart. From the left atrium, the blood will then be pumped into the left ventricle and eventually circulated throughout the body via the aorta.

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  • 28. 

    During exercise

    • A.

      Venous return increases

    • B.

      Vasodilation occurs at the active skeletal muscles

    • C.

      Both cardiac output and stroke volume increase

    • D.

      All of the above

    • E.

      A and C only

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    During exercise, the body requires more oxygen and nutrients, which leads to an increase in venous return. This is because the muscles are working harder and require more blood flow. Additionally, vasodilation occurs at the active skeletal muscles, which means that the blood vessels widen to allow more blood to flow through them. As a result, both cardiac output (the amount of blood pumped by the heart per minute) and stroke volume (the amount of blood pumped by the heart per beat) increase. Therefore, the correct answer is "all of the above."

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  • 29. 

    Branches off the aortic arch include the 

    • A.

      Left subclavian artery

    • B.

      Left common carotid artery

    • C.

      Brachiocephalic trunk

    • D.

      All of the above

    • E.

      B and C only

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "all of the above" because the branches off the aortic arch include the left subclavian artery, left common carotid artery, and brachiocephalic trunk.

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  • 30. 

    The _________ divides the aorta into the thoracic aorta and the abdominal aorta.

    • A.

      Pericardium

    • B.

      Peritoneum

    • C.

      Diaphragm

    • D.

      Mediastinum

    • E.

      Pleura

    Correct Answer
    C. Diaphragm
    Explanation
    The diaphragm is a dome-shaped muscle that separates the thoracic cavity from the abdominal cavity. It plays a crucial role in respiration by contracting and relaxing to allow for the expansion and contraction of the lungs. In addition to its respiratory function, the diaphragm also acts as a barrier that separates the aorta into the thoracic aorta (above the diaphragm) and the abdominal aorta (below the diaphragm). Therefore, the diaphragm is the correct answer to the question.

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  • 31. 

    Which of the following organs is NOT part of the lower respiratory system?

    • A.

      Trachea

    • B.

      Alveoli

    • C.

      Bronchi

    • D.

      Larynx

    • E.

      Oropharynx

    Correct Answer
    E. Oropharynx
    Explanation
    The oropharynx is not part of the lower respiratory system. It is actually part of the upper respiratory system. The lower respiratory system consists of the trachea, bronchi, and alveoli, which are involved in the process of respiration. The oropharynx, on the other hand, is located in the throat and is responsible for conducting air and food into the respiratory and digestive systems respectively.

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  • 32. 

    The vocal folds are located within the

    • A.

      Nasopharynx

    • B.

      Larynx

    • C.

      Bronchi

    • D.

      Oropharynx

    • E.

      Trachea

    Correct Answer
    B. Larynx
    Explanation
    The vocal folds are located within the larynx. The larynx, also known as the voice box, is a part of the respiratory system located in the throat. It houses the vocal folds, which are responsible for producing sound when air passes through them and causes them to vibrate. The larynx plays a crucial role in speech and also helps to protect the airway during swallowing.

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  • 33. 

    The elastic cartilage that covers the opening to the larynx during swallowing is the

    • A.

      Cuneiform cartilage

    • B.

      Thyroid cartilage

    • C.

      Epiglottis

    • D.

      Cricoid cartilage

    • E.

      Corniculate cartilage

    Correct Answer
    C. Epiglottis
    Explanation
    The epiglottis is a flap of elastic cartilage that covers the opening to the larynx during swallowing. Its main function is to prevent food and liquids from entering the airway and going into the lungs. When we swallow, the epiglottis closes over the larynx, directing the food and liquids down the esophagus and into the stomach. It then opens again to allow air to pass through the larynx and into the lungs for breathing. The other cartilages listed are also part of the larynx, but they do not specifically cover the opening during swallowing.

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  • 34. 

    The respiratory epithelium of the conducting airways consists of

    • A.

      Ciliated squamous epithelium

    • B.

      Surfactant cells

    • C.

      Moist cuboidal epithelium

    • D.

      Pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium

    • E.

      Simple squamous epithelium

    Correct Answer
    D. Pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium
    Explanation
    The correct answer is pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium. This type of epithelium is found in the conducting airways of the respiratory system. It is characterized by the presence of cilia, which help to move mucus and trapped particles out of the airways. The epithelium appears to be stratified due to the varying heights of the cells, but in reality, all the cells are anchored to the basement membrane. This type of epithelium is well-suited for its function of protecting and clearing the airways.

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  • 35. 

    The respiratory membrane of the gas exchange surfaces consists of 

    • A.

      Moist cuboidal epithelium

    • B.

      Surfactant cells

    • C.

      Ciliated squamous epithelium

    • D.

      Simple squamous epithelium

    • E.

      Pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium

    Correct Answer
    D. Simple squamous epithelium
    Explanation
    The respiratory membrane of the gas exchange surfaces consists of simple squamous epithelium. This type of epithelium is composed of a single layer of flat cells, allowing for efficient diffusion of gases across the membrane. The thinness of the cells reduces the distance that gases need to travel, facilitating rapid exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide between the lungs and bloodstream.

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  • 36. 

    Boyle's law states that gas volume is

    • A.

      Inversely proportional to temperature

    • B.

      Directly proportional to pressure

    • C.

      Directly proportional to temperature

    • D.

      Inversely proportional to pressure

    • E.

      Both A and B

    Correct Answer
    D. Inversely proportional to pressure
    Explanation
    Boyle's law states that the volume of a gas is inversely proportional to its pressure. This means that as the pressure on a gas increases, its volume decreases, and vice versa. The relationship between volume and pressure is a direct one, meaning that as one variable increases, the other also increases. Therefore, the correct answer is that gas volume is inversely proportional to pressure.

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  • 37. 

    MOSt of the oxygen transported by the blood is

    • A.

      Bound to hemoglobin

    • B.

      Bound to the same protein as carbon dioxide

    • C.

      Dissolved in plasma

    • D.

      Carried by white blood cells

    • E.

      In ionic form as solute in the plasma

    Correct Answer
    A. Bound to hemoglobin
    Explanation
    Oxygen is primarily transported by the blood through its binding to hemoglobin, a protein found in red blood cells. Hemoglobin has a high affinity for oxygen, allowing it to bind to oxygen molecules in the lungs and release them in tissues throughout the body. This mechanism ensures efficient oxygen delivery to cells and tissues.

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  • 38. 

    MOST of the carbon dioxide in the blood is transported as

    • A.

      Solute dissolved in the plasma

    • B.

      Carbonic acid

    • C.

      Bicarbonate ions

    • D.

      Solute dissolved in the cytoplasm of red blood cells

    • E.

      Carbaminohemoglobin

    Correct Answer
    C. Bicarbonate ions
    Explanation
    Carbon dioxide is primarily transported in the blood as bicarbonate ions. When carbon dioxide enters the red blood cells, it combines with water to form carbonic acid. This carbonic acid then dissociates into bicarbonate ions and hydrogen ions. The bicarbonate ions are transported in the plasma, while the hydrogen ions bind to hemoglobin in the red blood cells. This bicarbonate ion transport mechanism allows for efficient removal of carbon dioxide from the tissues and its transport to the lungs for elimination.

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  • 39. 

    The _________ is shared by the respiratory and digestive systems.

    • A.

      Esophagus

    • B.

      Trachea

    • C.

      Windpipe

    • D.

      Pharynx

    • E.

      Right mainstem bronchus

    Correct Answer
    D. Pharynx
    Explanation
    The pharynx is a part of both the respiratory and digestive systems. It is a muscular tube that connects the nasal cavity and mouth to the esophagus and trachea. It plays a role in both breathing and swallowing. When we breathe, air passes through the pharynx and into the trachea. When we swallow, food and liquids pass through the pharynx and into the esophagus. Therefore, the pharynx is shared by both systems.

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  • 40. 

    During a choking episode, most foreign objects are lodged in the __________ bronchus due to its larger diameter and steeper angle.

    • A.

      Right secondary

    • B.

      Left primary

    • C.

      Left secondary

    • D.

      Right primary

    • E.

      A and B are equal

    Correct Answer
    D. Right primary
    Explanation
    During a choking episode, most foreign objects are lodged in the right primary bronchus due to its larger diameter and steeper angle. This means that the right primary bronchus provides a more direct pathway for foreign objects to become lodged, making it more susceptible to blockages. The left primary bronchus is less likely to be affected due to its smaller diameter and less steep angle.

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  • Current Version
  • Jan 24, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
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  • May 14, 2011
    Quiz Created by
    Rachelelyse
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