Pop Quiz - How Well Do You Know Manual?

11 Questions | Total Attempts: 94

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Camera Quizzes & Trivia

Let's take a look at your understanding of the basics of shooting in manual!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Shutter: Your camera's shutter opens and closes to let in light to the sensor.  Which of the following is true about your camera's shutter:
    • A. 

      A faster shutter speed stops action, a slower shutter speed blurs movement

    • B. 

      A faster shutter speed blurs action, a slower shutter speed stops action

    • C. 

      Fast shutter speeds are lower numbers like 1/60 or 1/15

    • D. 

      Fast shutter speeds are higher numbers like 1/200 or 1/500

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 2. 
    Aperture - Your camera's aperture is limited by your lens. If you read your lens barrel and it says the aperture ratio is 1:3.5-5.6 this means that:
    • A. 

      Your lens is broken

    • B. 

      Your lens only allows your aperture value to be between 3.5 and 5.6

    • C. 

      Your lens has a variable maximum aperture depending on how zoomed in it is

    • D. 

      None of the above

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 3. 
    Your aperture is how you control depth of field.  If you want a shallow focus for maximum bokeh allowed by the lens, set your aperture value to
    • A. 

      The highest number possible

    • B. 

      The lowest number possible

  • 4. 
    Its a nice, overcast day. Light everywhere is even shade. You've tried ISO 400, f/4.0, 1/300 as your starter settings, but you're over exposing the image.  What can you do to let in less light and balance the light meter?
    • A. 

      Increase ISO

    • B. 

      Decrease ISO

    • C. 

      Increase Aperture Value

    • D. 

      Decrease Aperture Value

    • E. 

      Increase Shutter Speed

  • 5. 
    Its a nice, overcast day. Light everywhere is even shade. You've tried ISO 200, f/4.0, 1/200 as your starter settings, but you're under exposing the image.  What can you do to bring in more light and balance the light meter?
    • A. 

      Increase ISO

    • B. 

      Decrease ISO

    • C. 

      Increase Aperture Value

    • D. 

      Decrease Aperture Value

    • E. 

      Decrease Shutter Speed

  • 6. 
    Its a bright sunny day.  You've found the only bit of shade in the area, under a nice big tree.  What do you need to remember for this lighting situation (hint: subject is in shade, background is bright)
    • A. 

      I need a fast shutter to make sure I get all the light

    • B. 

      I need a wide angle lens to get a full view of the scene

    • C. 

      I can't trust my light meter to read the light properly

    • D. 

      All of the above

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 7. 
    You're still under the tree in the only shade, background area is bright, subject is in shade.  Your camera meter read the light as ISO 200, f/8.0, 1/100 but there's something wrong: your subject is dark, but the area behind them is properly exposed.... what's going on?
    • A. 

      The light meter was fooled and read the light behind your subject. Time to adjust and let in more light through either ISO, shutter, or aperture

    • B. 

      The light meter was fooled and read the light behind your subject. Time to adjust and let in less light through either ISO, shutter, or aperture

    • C. 

      The light meter was fooled and read the light behind your subject. Time to get a light reading from your subject's knees (camera slightly pointed downward) and start from there instead.

  • 8. 
    You're still under that tree in the only shade, background area is bright, subject is in shade.Since the original settings of ISO 200, f/8.0 and 1/100 weren't lighting your subject enough, what can you do to bring in more light?
    • A. 

      Increase ISO, Increase Aperture Value, or Increase Shutter

    • B. 

      Increase ISO, Decrease Aperture Value, or Increase Shutter

    • C. 

      Increase ISO, Decrease Aperture Value, or Decrease Shutter

    • D. 

      Decrease ISO, Decrease Aperture Value, or Decrease Shutter

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 9. 
    You just shot the test image with settings of ISO 400, f/5.6, 1/200 for an active 3 year old boy's image in the shade.  You're still a tad under exposed.  What would be the best way to get a balanced exposure?
    • A. 

      Increase ISO, leave aperture value as is, increase shutter

    • B. 

      Increase ISO, leave aperture value as is, leave shutter

    • C. 

      Increase ISO, decrease aperture value, leave shutter

    • D. 

      Increase ISO, decrease aperture value, decrease shutter

    • E. 

      Leave ISO as is, decrease aperture value, leave shutter

  • 10. 
    Its bright and sunny everywhere at the park today... but you really want to get pictures of your kids playing on the equipment. What should you do to achieve a Sunny 16 start point?
    • A. 

      Start with a low ISO of 100 or 200, and then put the shutter to match. Set aperture to f/16. Test shoot it and adjust from there.

    • B. 

      Start with a low ISO of 100 or 200 and then push the shutter up to 400 to catch movement. Make sure your aperture is at f/16.

    • C. 

      Start with a high ISO for 'more light' and then put the shutter to 1/16. Drop the aperture to the lowest setting available

    • D. 

      Start with a high ISO for 'more light' and then set shutter to 1/16 and aperture to f/16. They have to be balanced!

    • E. 

      None of the above.

  • 11. 
    It's bright and sunny at the park, but you don't want a high aperture with deep focus - how can you break the sunny 16 rule to start? 
    • A. 

      You can't - when you've got that much sun light, you have to follow the rule or everything will be over exposed

    • B. 

      You know that a higher aperture value lets in less light, so opening up to f/5.6 means that you'll be getting a ton of light coming into the camera. To fix this, you put your ISO as low as it will go, and then start adjusting your shutter to something higher than 1/200 until the meter balances.

    • C. 

      You know that a lower aperture value means that you'll get more blur. So you keep ISO at 100 since its bright out, decrease the aperture value to wide open (3.5 or less depending on the lens), and then push the shutter speed up to fast, fast, fast speeds.

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