Pols 2310 Fourth Exam

25 Questions | Total Attempts: 34

SettingsSettingsSettings
Please wait...
Political Science Quizzes & Trivia

Intro to political science 2310 fourth exam.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Which of the following is NOT one of the reasons that Crito offers in trying to convince Socrates to escape from jail?
    • A. 

      Crito does not want his friend to die.

    • B. 

      Crito wants Socrates to avenge the injustice against him.

    • C. 

      Crito fears being seen as unwilling to spend his money for his friend.

    • D. 

      Crito claims that some will think that he and Socrates have not been courageous if Socrates does not escape.

  • 2. 
    At the beginning of the Crito, where does Crito go to get information about what specific things he should do and not do to be a good person?
    • A. 

      Public opinion

    • B. 

      Religion

    • C. 

      The laws

    • D. 

      Thought about the meaning of justice

  • 3. 
    How does Socrates evaluate the source that Crito uses (from the previous question) to get his information about what he should do to be a good person?
    • A. 

      Socrates says it is not based on knowledge, but acts simply at random.

    • B. 

      Socrates agrees that it is a valuable source of information about good and bad and right and wrong.

    • C. 

      Socrates knows that it is the best way to understand justice, but fears that Crito is not able to use it well.

    • D. 

      Socrates is unsure of the value of the information, and asks Crito to prove its utility.

  • 4. 
    Socrates will violate public opinion without proof that justice requires it, but he will not violate the law without proof that justice requires it. For this to make sense, which of the following must be true?
    • A. 

      Public opinion is a better guide for action than law.

    • B. 

      It might be that the law is based on some genuine understanding of good and bad.

    • C. 

      Laws only require people to do that which they really want to do.

    • D. 

      Law is based on power, but not on authority.

  • 5. 
    Which of the following is something that Socrates says in explaining the general meaning of justice as it applies to the question of his escaping from jail?
    • A. 

      It is never right to be unjust, even to someone who has been unjust to you first.

    • B. 

      Violation of a law is not unjust when the law itself is wrong.

    • C. 

      Generosity and courage are virtues that are at least as important as justice in deciding how to act.

    • D. 

      When seeking to understand justice, it is better to consider the opinion of the people, especially in a democracy.

  • 6. 
    When Socrates develops the general meaning of justice and begins to apply it to the question of whether Socrates should escape from jail, Crito responds by:
    • A. 

      Disagreeing with Socrates on the question of whether justice requires abiding by agreements.

    • B. 

      Saying that he does not understand Socrates' statement about the meaning of justice and its application.

    • C. 

      Objecting that the laws sometimes do not define justice well.

    • D. 

      Agreeing that it is sometimes the role of a just person to return injustice for injustice.

  • 7. 
    According to the argument that Socrates and the laws make,
    • A. 

      Disobedience of the law tends to destroy the law.

    • B. 

      Disobedience of the laws should be encouraged when the law commands something harmful.

    • C. 

      The law can be trusted to be perfectly just only when the majority rules.

    • D. 

      Law need not be obeyed in cases where its application would result in imperfect justice.

  • 8. 
    The laws claim to Socrates that:
    • A. 

      "we give you and other Athenians only good things."

    • B. 

      "we are not capable of making mistakes and so must be obeyed in big things and the little things."

    • C. 

      "we declare that it is the responsibility of each Athenian to understand for himself what justice requires."

    • D. 

      "we gave you and every other Athenian a share of all the good things we could."

  • 9. 
    Which of the following is NOT one of the ways that the Crito suggests the value of laws for the benefit of people?
    • A. 

      The laws point to a democratic origin as evidence that they do not make mistakes.

    • B. 

      Laws are introduced as a character to help explain the meaning of justice.

    • C. 

      Socrates requires an argument about the meaning of justice before he will violate law.

    • D. 

      The laws argue that people would be harmed by being deprived of certain benefits if the laws were to be destroyed.

  • 10. 
    Which of the following is correct?
    • A. 

      Neither Socrates nor the laws argue that the laws are always good or just in what they require.

    • B. 

      The laws claim to be valuable because they are based on the correct understanding of human happiness.

    • C. 

      The laws in the Crito agree with Creon that anarchy is the greatest evil.

    • D. 

      Socrates' argument about the value of the law in the Crito rests on the assumption that the laws are made by the most prudent people.

  • 11. 
    In the Crito, Socrates concludes that disobeying the law:
    • A. 

      Is always unjust.

    • B. 

      Is unjust unless the law requires an injustice.

    • C. 

      Is unjust so long as the laws are made with the welfare of the whole people in mind.

    • D. 

      Is unjust unless the goal of the disobedience is to change a bad law.

  • 12. 
    The argument in the Crito that disobeying the laws is unjust:
    • A. 

      Is valid only in political communities in which people have agreed to obey the laws.

    • B. 

      Does not assume that the laws do not make mistakes.

    • C. 

      Assumes that the laws are made by prudent rules and always direct people to their own good.

    • D. 

      Does not assume any relationship between human happiness and the laws.

  • 13. 
    Like most people, Crito needs help deciding what things he should do and not do to be a good person. According to the Crito, what is the BEST available source for that help?
    • A. 

      Public opinion, since most people have a feeling about what is good and bad.

    • B. 

      The laws, since they are meant to direct behavior that will enable people to live better.

    • C. 

      His own moral understanding -- each person is reasonable and has some sense of good and bad.

    • D. 

      Socrates' arguments about justice, since Socrates understands justice better than the laws do.

  • 14. 
    According to the argument of the Crito, is there a reason why people should want to obey the law just because it is the law?
    • A. 

      No. The only reason to obey is fear of the power of the rulers.

    • B. 

      Yes. Laws benefits other people and breaking it makes it less secure.

    • C. 

      No. Some laws prevent some people from doing the most important things for human beings to do.

    • D. 

      Yes. Laws require only good, beneficial, and just things.

  • 15. 
    Which of the following is the most similar in its reasoning to the argument in the Crito that it would be harmful to destroy the laws and the community even though they are imperfect?
    • A. 

      Since the patient's disease was terminal, the hospital decided that the appropriate course was simply to make the patient comfortable.

    • B. 

      Even though the proposed program failed to alleviate completely the problem of excessive mortgage foreclosures, the policymakers argued for it as the best available alternative to addressing the problem.

    • C. 

      Because it sometimes takes a long time for one to drive from the outskirts of town to downtown, it would be a good idea to destroy the freeway system and start over.

    • D. 

      The country should maintain a republican form of government because it is the best form that can be devised by the minds of human beings.

  • 16. 
    Socrates claims that if he had tried to be more involved in politics in Athens:
    • A. 

      Athenian laws would be more just.

    • B. 

      The teachings of the poets would be regulated by law.

    • C. 

      He would have been killed a long time ago.

    • D. 

      Meletus would have been unable to indict him.

  • 17. 
    Socrates claims to be the best citizen of Athens because he:
    • A. 

      Helps his fellow Athenians to think about whether they are living their lives well.

    • B. 

      Actively questions the motives of the politicians.

    • C. 

      Argues against wars for conquest.

    • D. 

      Listens carefully to debate and reaches objectives, non-partisan decisions.

  • 18. 
    Socrates explains the small margin of the vote against him for conviction by saying that:
    • A. 

      He was not convicted by Meletus.

    • B. 

      He was convicted by Meletus.

    • C. 

      He was not convinced by Anytus.

    • D. 

      He was not convicted by Lycon.

  • 19. 
    Socrates' analysis of the size of the vote to convict him and of the reasons why the jury voted as it did leads to a conclusion that:
    • A. 

      The people voted to convict Socrates primarily because they were prejudiced against him.

    • B. 

      Socrates did nothing that could be seen as threatening to political stability in Athens.

    • C. 

      It was mainly a prejudice against Socrates that led people to vote that he was guilty.

    • D. 

      The people voted to convict Socrates because they saw him as a serious threat to the stability of politics in Athens.

  • 20. 
    Which among the following was NOT among the principal goals of Lycurgus's laws?
    • A. 

      Public spiritedness

    • B. 

      Temperance

    • C. 

      Prosperity

    • D. 

      Justice

  • 21. 
    In comparing his old, or informal accusers to his new accusers, the ones who have brought the actual charges against him in court, Socrates say that:
    • A. 

      The informal accusers are less dangerous to him than the ones who have actually brought him into court.

    • B. 

      The formal accusers are less dangerous to him than the ones who have created the prejudice against him.

    • C. 

      The claims that are spread by the old accusers contradict the charges that are brought by the formal accusers.

    • D. 

      The "new" accusers have nothing to say that anyone in the jury is likely to believe.

  • 22. 
    Which of the following is NOT among the things that Socrates says the old accusers teach people to believe?
    • A. 

      Socrates studies the things under the earth.

    • B. 

      Socrates makes the worse argument appear stronger.

    • C. 

      Socrates studies the things in the sky.

    • D. 

      Socrates believes in new divinities.

  • 23. 
    Which of the following is a claim that Socrates makes in attempting to show that the people should not be prejudiced against him?
    • A. 

      The jury has not heard him discussing such things in the market place.

    • B. 

      Narrow prejudices lead to the destruction of political communities.

    • C. 

      People who study science must believe in gods.

    • D. 

      There is no connection between politics, religion, and science.

  • 24. 
    Which of the following is a part of the formal charge, the charge that actually brought Socrates into court?
    • A. 

      Socrates is an atheist.

    • B. 

      Socrates makes the worse argument appear the stronger.

    • C. 

      Socrates undermines the political stability in Athens.

    • D. 

      Socrates corrupts the youth.

  • 25. 
    The chorus's expectation in Antigone about what will motivate human beings to action or inaction is best exemplified by which of the following characters?
    • A. 

      Antigone towards the end of the play.

    • B. 

      Antigone towards the beginning of the play.

    • C. 

      The guard explaining why he came to give Creon the bad news.

    • D. 

      Creon in his conversation with Haemon.

Back to Top Back to top