A Poet's Toolbox Quiz

11 Questions | Total Attempts: 58

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A Poet

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    This occurs when a poet uses a sequence of words that have the same vowel sound. Example: "Strips of tinfoil winking like people" (Sylvia Plath, "The Bee Meeting")
    • A. 

      Repetition

    • B. 

      Assonance

    • C. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 2. 
    When a poet repeats words or phrases to create a rhythm or set a mood. Example: The water dripped, dripped, dripped from the leaky faucet.   
    • A. 

      Assonance

    • B. 

      Rhythm

    • C. 

      Repetition

  • 3. 
    When the poet chooses words whose sounds make you think of their meanings. Example: meow, woof, zap, bang, pow, buzz, thump, quack, yuck, boom, beep 
    • A. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • B. 

      Consonance

    • C. 

      Aliteration

  • 4. 
    When a poet uses words that rhyme at the ends of two or more lines of poetry. Example: The girl walked down the street She was looking for something to eat.
    • A. 

      Repetition

    • B. 

      Consonance

    • C. 

      End Rhyme

  • 5. 
    When a poet uses words that have the same consonant sound anywhere whithin the words. Example:  'First and last,' 'odds and ends,' 'short and sweet,' 'a stroke of luck,' or Shakespeare's 'struts and frets'
    • A. 

      Repetition

    • B. 

      Consonance

    • C. 

      End Rhyme

  • 6. 
    This occurs when the poet uses a sequence of words that begin with the same letter or consonant sound. Example: The slithery snake sneaked stealthily.
    • A. 

      Aliteration

    • B. 

      Consonance

    • C. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 7. 
    The way a poem moves from one idea to the next.  In many poems (but not all), words are arranged in patterns of accented and unaccented syllables. Example: Roses are red                   Violets are blue
    • A. 

      Rhythm

    • B. 

      Repetition

    • C. 

      Assonance

  • 8. 
    This compares one thing to something unlike it using like or as. Example: Coat hooks hold winter hats like bare branches hold old nexts.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Personification

  • 9. 
    This makes a comparison in which something not human is described with human qualities. Example: My eggs stared back like sick eyes.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Personification

  • 10. 
    This makes a comparison without using like or as. Example: The street is my heart.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Personification

  • 11. 
    This makes exaggerated comparisons for effect.  Sometimes these are funny. Example: It was so hot we fried.
    • A. 

      Personification

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Metaphor

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