Abdominal Examination MCQ Quiz Questions And Answers

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Abdominal Examination MCQ Quiz Questions And Answers - Quiz

Do you know about abdominal pains? If you wish to check your knowledge of abdominal examination, take this quiz. While examining abdomen or abdominal pains, a lot of factors are considered. There are also different terms that are related to the abdomen. Here, we have got a few questions to find out how well you know about the abdominal exchange. Your scores will reveal how much more knowledge you need. All the best for a perfect score. You can share the quiz with other medical aspirants also.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Abdominal pain is one of the most frequent reasons for a visit to the doctor.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 2. 
    Abdominal pain accounts for about 20 percent of all emergency room visits.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 3. 
    Which of the following are Chronic abdominal pain syndromes?
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Pancreatitis

    • D. 

      Perforation

    • E. 

      Obstruction

    • F. 

      Infarction

    • G. 

      Esophagitis

    • H. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • I. 

      Dyspepsia

    • J. 

      IBS

  • 4. 
    A 27 y/o female presents to your clinic with a chief complaint of abnormal flatulence and bloating for the past three months. The patient mentions that she is a PA student at Miami Dade College and that she is under a lot of stress. She says she also has alternating bouts of diarrhea and constipation. You suspect that this student has:
    • A. 

      Cholecystitis

    • B. 

      Pancreatitis

    • C. 

      Infarction

    • D. 

      Esophagitis

    • E. 

      Dyspepsia

    • F. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • G. 

      Renal calculi

  • 5. 
    A 35 y/o male presents to your clinic with a chief complaint of abdominal pain secondary to vomiting and unusual burping. You ask the patient to describe their pain, to which they respond with "gnawing and burning like a fire that comes and goes as it pleases." You ask the patient to point with one finger where it hurts, and they point to the upper middle part of their stomach. With a description as such, you would automatically suspect:
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Diverticulitis

    • C. 

      Esophagitis

    • D. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • E. 

      Dyspepsia

    • F. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • G. 

      Renal calculi

  • 6. 
    You are eating on campus at MDC Medical and notice another PA student choking on their food. You immediately run over to help. You perform the Heimlich maneuver and successfully dislodge the bolus from your fellow PA-S. The student sincerely thanks you and says, "Wow, this is the fifth time that has happened this month! It kinda hurts when I swallow sometimes, and it gets stuck back there at times. Thanks for saving me!" You suspect that your fellow PA-S may have:
    • A. 

      Pancreatitis

    • B. 

      Perforation

    • C. 

      Obstruction

    • D. 

      Infarction

    • E. 

      Esophagitis

    • F. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • G. 

      Renal calculi

  • 7. 
    A 65 y/o female presents to your clinic with severe, colicky, continuous abdominal pain. You first auscultate the abdomen and then begin palpation. You note that there is no particular rebound tenderness and rule out cholelithiasis and nephrolithiasis. The patient denies a history of ulcers. You suspect that this patient may have:
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Pancreatitis

    • C. 

      Perforation

    • D. 

      Obstruction

    • E. 

      Infarction

    • F. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • G. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

  • 8. 
    A 32 y/o male post-op patient presents to your clinic with a chief complaint of "not farting or pooping for days." He complains that he is typically on a "pooping schedule" and is typically "very regular." He also states that he typically passes gas a few times a day. He became worried when he had not experienced either for the past two days. You note that he experiences moderate cramping around the umbilicus. You rule out appendicitis with all the appropriate tests. What do you suspect this patient has?
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Pancreatitis

    • D. 

      Perforation

    • E. 

      Obstruction

    • F. 

      Infarction

    • G. 

      Esophagitis

  • 9. 
    A 32 y/o female post-op patient presents to the ER with a chief complaint of N/V with severe abdominal pain. You immediately lay the patient down to auscultate the abdomen and note that bowel sounds are absent. You suspect the patient has what condition as a complication of surgery?
    • A. 

      Pancreatitis

    • B. 

      Perforation

    • C. 

      Obstruction

    • D. 

      Infarction

    • E. 

      Esophagitis

    • F. 

      Dyspepsia

    • G. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

  • 10. 
    A 66 y/o male patient presents with severe URQ pain that worsens upon respiration. The patient expresses that they experience more discomfort after eating and at times feel nauseous. You ask the patient about their last bowel movement and note that the patient says their last few movements were a grayish clay color. You suspect possibly:
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Diverticulitis

    • D. 

      Pancreatitis

    • E. 

      Perforation

    • F. 

      Obstruction

    • G. 

      Dyspepsia

  • 11. 
    A 14 y/o female patient presents to your pediatric clinic with a low-grade fever. You ask her to sit up, but she expresses that it hurts too much to move and would rather stay lying down. The patient exhibits involuntary guarding of both lower quadrants of the abdomen and begins to cry when you palpate McBurney's point. You immediately suspect:
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Diverticulitis

    • C. 

      Pancreatitis

    • D. 

      Obstruction

    • E. 

      Infarction

    • F. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • G. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

  • 12. 
    Occurs before the doctor actually makes contact.
    • A. 

      Guarding

    • B. 

      Involuntary guarding

    • C. 

      Voluntary guarding

  • 13. 
    Occurs the moment the doctor's hand touches the abdomen
    • A. 

      Guarding

    • B. 

      Involuntary guarding

    • C. 

      Voluntary guarding

  • 14. 
    Increased pain with coughing
    • A. 

      Obturator sign

    • B. 

      Psoas sign

    • C. 

      Dunphys sign

  • 15. 
    Pain on internal rotation of right thigh (pelvic appendix) 
    • A. 

      Obturator sign

    • B. 

      Psoas sign

    • C. 

      Dunphys sign

  • 16. 
    Pain on extension of right thigh (retroperitoneal retrocecal appendix)
    • A. 

      Obturator sign

    • B. 

      Psoas sign

    • C. 

      Dunphys sign

  • 17. 
    What is the preferred order for examination of the abdomen?
    • A. 

      Inspection, auscultation, percussion, palpation

    • B. 

      Percussion, auscultation, palpation, inspection

    • C. 

      Auscultation, inspection, palpation, percussion

    • D. 

      Inspection, palpation, auscultation, percussion

  • 18. 
    You are in the emergency room assessing a patient with abdominal pain and fever. You are performing an abdominal examination to assess for peritoneal signs. Which of the following is NOT a peritoneal sign?
    • A. 

      Rebound tenderness

    • B. 

      Involuntary guarding

    • C. 

      Rigidity of the abdomen

    • D. 

      Voluntary guarding

  • 19. 
    A 15 y/o high school student presents to the clinic with a 1-day history of nausea and anorexia. He describes the pain as generalized yesterday, but today it has localized to the right lower quadrant. You palpate the left lower quadrant, and the patient experiences pain in the right lower quadrant. What is the name of this sign?
    • A. 

      Psoas sign

    • B. 

      Obturator sign

    • C. 

      Rovsings sign

    • D. 

      Cutaneous hyperesthesia

  • 20. 
    A 25 y/o veterinarian presents to the clinic for evaluation of flank pain, dysuria, nausea, and fever. A urine pregnancy test is negative. A urine dipstick is positive for leukocyte esterase. On physical examination, what would be the most likely sign expected?
    • A. 

      Psoas sign

    • B. 

      CVA tenderness

    • C. 

      Rovsings sign

    • D. 

      Murphys sign

  • 21. 
    A 40 y/o flight attendant presents to your office for evaluation of abdominal pain. It is worse after eating, especially if she has a meal that is spicy or high in fat. She has tried over-the-counter antacids, but they have not helped the pain. After examining her abdomen, you strongly suspect cholecystitis. Which sign-on examination increases your suspicion of this diagnosis?
    • A. 

      Psoas sign

    • B. 

      Rovsings sign

    • C. 

      Murphys sign

    • D. 

      Grey turners sign

  • 22. 
    A 22 y/o celebrity with a known history of intravenous drug use presents to the ER for evaluation of a 5-day history of nausea, emesis, and RUQ abdominal pain. On the general survey, he appears ill, and his skin is distinctly yellow. He has a temperature of 102.5 degrees F and a heart rate of 112 bpm. You provisionally diagnose him with acute hepatitis. What would you expect to find on abdominal examination?
    • A. 

      Liver edge is tender and 4-5 finger breadths below the RCM

    • B. 

      Liver edge is nonpalpable

    • C. 

      Liver edge is tender and 1 finger breadth below the RCM

    • D. 

      Liver edge is nontender and 4-5 finger breadths below the RCM

  • 23. 
    Palpable deep to the left costal margin during inspiration
    • A. 

      Liver edge

    • B. 

      Spleen edge

    • C. 

      Rovsing's sign

    • D. 

      Psoas sign

    • E. 

      Obturator sign

    • F. 

      Cutaneous hyperesthesia

  • 24. 
    Palpable 6 cm below the right costal margin in the midclavicular line during inspiration
    • A. 

      Liver edge

    • B. 

      Spleen edge

    • C. 

      Rovsing's sign

    • D. 

      Psoas sign

    • E. 

      Obturator sign

    • F. 

      Cutaneous hyperesthesia

  • 25. 
    Pain in the right lower quadrant during palpation of the left lower quadrant
    • A. 

      Liver edge

    • B. 

      Spleen edge

    • C. 

      Rovsing's sign

    • D. 

      Psoas sign

    • E. 

      Obturator sign

    • F. 

      Cutaneous hyperesthesia

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