Pd Abdomen Quiz Part 2

35 Questions | Total Attempts: 1148

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Abdomen Quizzes & Trivia


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Abdominal pain is one of the most frequent reasons for a visit to the doctor.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 2. 
    Abdominal pain accounts for about 20 percent of all emergency room visits.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 3. 
    Which of the following are Acute abdominal pain syndromes?
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Pancreatitis

    • D. 

      Perforation

    • E. 

      Obstruction

    • F. 

      Infarction

    • G. 

      Esophagitis

    • H. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • I. 

      Dyspepsia

    • J. 

      IBS

  • 4. 
    Which of the following are Chronic abdominal pain syndromes?
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Pancreatitis

    • D. 

      Perforation

    • E. 

      Obstruction

    • F. 

      Infarction

    • G. 

      Esophagitis

    • H. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • I. 

      Dyspepsia

    • J. 

      IBS

  • 5. 
    A patient presents with severe pain in the side and back just below the ribs which radiates to the lower abdomen and groin. You begin your assessment, but the patient leaves the room complaining that they have the persistent urge to urinate. Automatically you would suspect which of the following conditions?
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Diverticulitis

    • D. 

      Pancreatitis

    • E. 

      Perforation

    • F. 

      Obstruction

    • G. 

      Infarction

    • H. 

      Esophagitis

    • I. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • J. 

      Dyspepsia

    • K. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • L. 

      Renal calculi

  • 6. 
    A patient presents to your clinic with a chief complaint of N/V, fever, chills, and pain upon urination. You take a urine specimen from the patient and note a reddish-brown color in the urine. Which of the following do you suspect? 
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Diverticulitis

    • D. 

      Pancreatitis

    • E. 

      Perforation

    • F. 

      Obstruction

    • G. 

      Infarction

    • H. 

      Esophagitis

    • I. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • J. 

      Dyspepsia

    • K. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • L. 

      Renal calculi

  • 7. 
    A 27 y/o female presents to your clinic with a chief complaint of abnormal flatulence and bloating for the past 3 months. The patient mentions that she is a PA student at Miami Dade College and that she is under a lot of stress. She says she also has alternating bouts of diarrhea and constipation. You suspect that this student has:
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Diverticulitis

    • D. 

      Pancreatitis

    • E. 

      Perforation

    • F. 

      Obstruction

    • G. 

      Infarction

    • H. 

      Esophagitis

    • I. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • J. 

      Dyspepsia

    • K. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • L. 

      Renal calculi

  • 8. 
    A 35 y/o male presents to your clinic with a chief complaint of abdominal pain secondary to vomiting and unusual burping. You ask the patient to describe their pain to which they respond with "gnawing and burning like fire that comes and goes as it pleases". You ask the patient to point with one finger where it hurts and they point to the upper middle part of their stomach. With a description as such, you would automatically suspect:
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Diverticulitis

    • D. 

      Pancreatitis

    • E. 

      Perforation

    • F. 

      Obstruction

    • G. 

      Infarction

    • H. 

      Esophagitis

    • I. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • J. 

      Dyspepsia

    • K. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • L. 

      Renal calculi

  • 9. 
    A 22 y/o male presents with a chief complaint of hunger and an empty feeling in the stomach not long after eating. He explains that his pain is sometimes complicated with nausea, but relieved with vomiting. He also explains that there are times when he wakes up at night with abdominal pain. You suspect the patient may have:
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Diverticulitis

    • D. 

      Pancreatitis

    • E. 

      Perforation

    • F. 

      Obstruction

    • G. 

      Infarction

    • H. 

      Esophagitis

    • I. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • J. 

      Dyspepsia

    • K. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • L. 

      Renal calculi

  • 10. 
    You are eating on campus at MDC Medical and notice another PA student choking on their food. You immediately run over to help. You perform the Heimlich maneuver and successfully dislodge the bolus from your fellow PA-S. The student sincerely thanks you and says "Wow, this is the fifth time that has happened this month! It kinda hurts when I swallow sometimes and it gets stuck back there at times. Thanks for saving me!" You suspect that your fellow PA-S may have:
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Diverticulitis

    • D. 

      Pancreatitis

    • E. 

      Perforation

    • F. 

      Obstruction

    • G. 

      Infarction

    • H. 

      Esophagitis

    • I. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • J. 

      Dyspepsia

    • K. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • L. 

      Renal calculi

  • 11. 
    A 65 y/o female presents to your clinic with severe, colicky, continuous abdominal pain. You first auscultate the abdomen and then begin palpation. You note that there is no particular rebound tenderness and rule out cholelithiasis and nephrolithiasis. The patient denies history of ulcers. You suspect that this patient may have:
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Diverticulitis

    • D. 

      Pancreatitis

    • E. 

      Perforation

    • F. 

      Obstruction

    • G. 

      Infarction

    • H. 

      Esophagitis

    • I. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • J. 

      Dyspepsia

    • K. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • L. 

      Renal calculi

  • 12. 
    A 32 y/o male post-op patient presents to your clinic with a chief complaint of "not farting or pooping for days". He complains that he is typically on a "pooping schedule" and is typically "very regular". He also states that he typically passes gas a few times a day. He became worried when he had not experienced either for the past two days. You note that he experiences moderate cramping around the umbillicus. You rule out appendicitis with all the appropriate tests. What do you suspect this patient has?
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Diverticulitis

    • D. 

      Pancreatitis

    • E. 

      Perforation

    • F. 

      Obstruction

    • G. 

      Infarction

    • H. 

      Esophagitis

    • I. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • J. 

      Dyspepsia

    • K. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • L. 

      Renal calculi

  • 13. 
    A 32 y/o female post-op patient presents to the ER with a chief complaint of N/V with severe abdominal pain. You immediately lay the patient down to auscultate the abdomen and note that bowel sounds are absent. You suspect the patient has what condition as a complication of surgery?
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Diverticulitis

    • D. 

      Pancreatitis

    • E. 

      Perforation

    • F. 

      Obstruction

    • G. 

      Infarction

    • H. 

      Esophagitis

    • I. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • J. 

      Dyspepsia

    • K. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • L. 

      Renal calculi

  • 14. 
    A 38 y/o male patient presents to your clinic with upper abdominal pain that radiates into the back. You check the patient's chart for his vitals and note that his heart rate was recorded on this visit at 130 bpm. The patient complains that the pain worsens when they lay supine and after eating. You suspect this patient may have:
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Diverticulitis

    • D. 

      Pancreatitis

    • E. 

      Perforation

    • F. 

      Obstruction

    • G. 

      Infarction

    • H. 

      Esophagitis

    • I. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • J. 

      Dyspepsia

    • K. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • L. 

      Renal calculi

  • 15. 
    A 56 y/o female patient presents to your clinic with a chief complaint of "nausea, not wanting to eat, and irregular bowel movements for the past 7 days". She explains that she became worried when she started to experience abnormal painful bloating in her abdomen. You begin your examination and note that upon palpation, the patient experiences severe pain in the lower left side of the abdomen. You suspect possible:
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Diverticulitis

    • D. 

      Pancreatitis

    • E. 

      Perforation

    • F. 

      Obstruction

    • G. 

      Infarction

    • H. 

      Esophagitis

    • I. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • J. 

      Dyspepsia

    • K. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • L. 

      Renal calculi

  • 16. 
    A 66 y/o male patient presents with severe URQ pain that worsens upon respiration. The patient expresses that they experience more discomfort after eating and at times feels nauseous. You ask the patient about their last bowel movement and note that the patient says their last few movements were a grayish clay-color. You suspect possible:
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Diverticulitis

    • D. 

      Pancreatitis

    • E. 

      Perforation

    • F. 

      Obstruction

    • G. 

      Infarction

    • H. 

      Esophagitis

    • I. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • J. 

      Dyspepsia

    • K. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • L. 

      Renal calculi

  • 17. 
    A 14 y/o female patient presents to your pediatric clinic with a low-grade fever. You ask her to sit up, but she expresses that it hurts too much to move and would rather stay laying down. The patient exhibits involuntary guarding of both lower quadrants of the abdomen and begins to cry when you palpate McBurney's point. You immediately suspect:
    • A. 

      Appendicitis

    • B. 

      Cholecystitis

    • C. 

      Diverticulitis

    • D. 

      Pancreatitis

    • E. 

      Perforation

    • F. 

      Obstruction

    • G. 

      Infarction

    • H. 

      Esophagitis

    • I. 

      Peptic ulcer disease

    • J. 

      Dyspepsia

    • K. 

      Irritable bowel syndrome

    • L. 

      Renal calculi

  • 18. 
    When a patient subconsciously tenses the abdominal muscles during an examination
    • A. 

      Guarding

    • B. 

      Involuntary guarding

    • C. 

      Voluntary guarding

  • 19. 
    Occurs before the doctor actually makes contact.
    • A. 

      Guarding

    • B. 

      Involuntary guarding

    • C. 

      Voluntary guarding

  • 20. 
    Occurs the moment the doctor's hand touches the abdomen
    • A. 

      Guarding

    • B. 

      Involuntary guarding

    • C. 

      Voluntary guarding

  • 21. 
    Increased pain with coughing
    • A. 

      Obturator sign

    • B. 

      Psoas sign

    • C. 

      Dunphys sign

  • 22. 
    Pain on internal rotation of right thigh (pelvic appendix) 
    • A. 

      Obturator sign

    • B. 

      Psoas sign

    • C. 

      Dunphys sign

  • 23. 
    Pain on extension of right thigh (retroperitoneal retrocecal appendix)
    • A. 

      Obturator sign

    • B. 

      Psoas sign

    • C. 

      Dunphys sign

  • 24. 
    What is the preferred order for examination of the abdomen?
    • A. 

      Inspection, auscultation, percussion, palpation

    • B. 

      Percussion, auscultation, palpation, inspection

    • C. 

      Auscultation, inspection, palpation, percussion

    • D. 

      Inspection, palpation, auscultation, percussion

  • 25. 
    You are in the emergency room assessing a patient with abdominal pain and fever. You are performing an abdominal examination to assess for peritoneal signs. Which of the following is NOT a peritoneal sign?
    • A. 

      Rebound tenderness

    • B. 

      Involuntary guarding

    • C. 

      Rigidity of the abdomen

    • D. 

      Voluntary guarding