P20(B)

55 Questions | Total Attempts: 311

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Blood Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Which factors contribute to ascites in patients with cirrhosis?
    • A. 

      A. increased aldosterone and deficit of albumin

    • B. 

      B. severe anemia and increased serum bilirubin

    • C. 

      C. hypokalemia and increased serum ammonia

    • D. 

      D. hyperproteinemia and persistent hypotension

  • 2. 
    Which of the following is a major cause of primary hepatocellular cancer?
    • A. 

      A. metastatic tumors

    • B. 

      B. acute hepatitis

    • C. 

      C. long-term exposure to certain chemicals

    • D. 

      D. chronic cholelithiasis

  • 3. 
    What causes massive inflammation and necrosis in acute pancreatitis?
    • A. 

      A. formation of multiple thrombi and ischemia

    • B. 

      B. infection by intestinal microbes

    • C. 

      C. immune complex reaction

    • D. 

      D. activation and spread of proteolytic enzymes

  • 4. 
    How does chemical peritonitis and shock frequently result from acute pancreatitis?
    • A. 

      A. Inflammation and increased vascular permeability of the peritoneum affect fluid balance.

    • B. 

      B. Erosions in the intestinal wall causes release of bacteria.

    • C. 

      C. Fat necrosis and hypocalcemia develop.

    • D. 

      D. Secretions from the pancreas and intestine become more acidic.

  • 5. 
    Malnutrition may develop in children with celiac disease because of:
    • A. 

      A. damage to the intestinal villi

    • B. 

      B. obstruction in the pancreatic ducts

    • C. 

      C. acidosis preventing activation of digestive enzymes

    • D. 

      D. insufficient bile for absorption

  • 6. 
    Which of the following best describes steatorrhea?
    • A. 

      A. a light gray-colored stool

    • B. 

      B. a tarry black stool

    • C. 

      C. bulky, fatty, foul-smelling stools

    • D. 

      D. watery stools with mucus and blood

  • 7. 
    What is the dietary requirement for a child with celiac disease?
    • A. 

      A. low sodium, high fat

    • B. 

      B. high carbohydrate, low protein

    • C. 

      C. high calorie with vitamin supplements

    • D. 

      D. gluten-free

  • 8. 
    What are the typical changes occurring with Crohn’s disease?
    • A. 

      A. degeneration and flattening of the villi in the small intestine

    • B. 

      B. multiple herniations of the mucosa through weak areas of the muscularis

    • C. 

      C. a continuous area of mucosal inflammation and ulceration in the rectum and colon

    • D. 

      D. inflamed areas of the wall of the ileum alternating with thick fibrotic or normal areas

  • 9. 
    Stools that are more liquid and contain mucus, frank blood, and pus are typical of:
    • A. 

      A. diverticulitis

    • B. 

      B. ulcerative colitis

    • C. 

      C. Crohn’s disease

    • D. 

      D. celiac disease

  • 10. 
    How may a fistula form with Crohn’s disease?
    • A. 

      A. lack of peristalsis leading to dilated areas of intestine

    • B. 

      B. fibrosis and thickening of the wall causing obstruction

    • C. 

      C. erosion of the mucosa causing bleeding

    • D. 

      D. recurrent inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis forming a connection between intestinal loops

  • 11. 
    How does iron-deficiency anemia frequently develop with ulcerative colitis?
    • A. 

      A. loss of surface area for absorption in the ileum

    • B. 

      B. bone marrow depression by toxic wastes

    • C. 

      C. chronic blood loss in stools

    • D. 

      D. insufficient hydrochloric acid for iron absorption

  • 12. 
    What is the cause of inflammatory bowel disease?
    • A. 

      A. physical and emotional stress

    • B. 

      B. an autoimmune reaction

    • C. 

      C. a combination of recessive genes

    • D. 

      D. idiopathic

  • 13. 
    What pain is typical of diverticulitis?
    • A. 

      A. lower left quadrant

    • B. 

      B. lower right quadrant

    • C. 

      C. sharp, colicky, periumbilical

    • D. 

      D. lower abdominal pain, radiating into the groin

  • 14. 
    What usually initiates acute appendicitis?
    • A. 

      A. infection in the appendix

    • B. 

      B. an episode of severe diarrhea

    • C. 

      C. obstruction of the lumen of the appendix

    • D. 

      D. eating a low-fiber diet

  • 15. 
    With acute appendicitis, localized pain and tenderness in the lower right quadrant results from:
    • A. 

      A. increased peristalsis in the adjacent colon

    • B. 

      B. inflammation and stretching of the appendiceal wall

    • C. 

      C. increased gas and fluid inside the appendix

    • D. 

      D. local inflammation of the parietal peritoneum

  • 16. 
    How does localized peritonitis develop from acute appendicitis before rupture?
    • A. 

      The omentum walls off the inflamed area.

    • B. 

      Intestinal bacteria escape through the necrotic appendiceal wall.

    • C. 

      The obstructing object inside the appendix perforates the wall

    • D. 

      Bacteria escape into the circulating blood

  • 17. 
    What is a typical early sign of cancer in the ascending colon?
    • A. 

      A. change in shape of the stool

    • B. 

      B. bleeding with defecation

    • C. 

      C. mild but persistent pain in the lower left quadrant

    • D. 

      D. occult blood in the stool

  • 18. 
    To which site does colon cancer usually first metastasize?
    • A. 

      A. lungs

    • B. 

      B. stomach

    • C. 

      C. liver

    • D. 

      D. spleen

  • 19. 
    How does a volvulus cause localized gangrene in the intestine?
    • A. 

      A. Hypotension and shock causes ischemia.

    • B. 

      B. The mesenteric arteries are compressed in the twisted section of intestine.

    • C. 

      C. A section of intestine herniates between the muscles of the abdominal wall.

    • D. 

      D. The distention of the intestinal wall causes increased permeability of the tissue.

  • 20. 
    Which of the following is a typical indicator of an intestinal obstruction caused by paralytic ileus?
    • A. 

      A. excessive audible bowel sounds

    • B. 

      B. intermittent colicky pain

    • C. 

      C. severe steady abdominal pain

    • D. 

      D. visible peristalsis

  • 21. 
    Partial obstruction of the sigmoid colon resulting from diverticular disease would likely:
    • A. 

      A. cause severe colicky pain

    • B. 

      B. cause frequent diarrhea

    • C. 

      C. develop very rapidly

    • D. 

      D. result in a small, hard stool

  • 22. 
    What causes hypovolemic shock to develop with intestinal obstruction?
    • A. 

      A. continued vomiting and fluid shift into the intestine

    • B. 

      B. hemorrhage into the intestine

    • C. 

      C. rupture of the intestinal wall

    • D. 

      D. repeated bouts of severe diarrhea

  • 23. 
    What causes the characteristic rigid abdomen found in the patient with peritonitis?
    • A. 

      A. increased fluid and gas causing abdominal distention

    • B. 

      B. inflammation of the peritoneum and organs causing a firm mass in the abdomen

    • C. 

      C. inflamed peritoneum resulting in reflex abdominal muscle spasm

    • D. 

      D. the patient voluntarily contracts the abdominal muscles as a protective mechanism

  • 24. 
    What would be the likely outcome from chemical peritonitis related to a perforated gall bladder?
    • A. 

      A. leakage of intestinal bacteria into blood and the peritoneal cavity

    • B. 

      B. massive hemorrhage and shock

    • C. 

      C. breakdown of the gallstones

    • D. 

      D. increasing peristalsis with intermittent painful spasms

  • 25. 
    How does pelvic inflammatory disease frequently lead to bacterial peritonitis?
    • A. 

      A. Chemical irritation by excessive ovarian and uterine secretions causes inflammation.

    • B. 

      B. Ulceration and perforation of the uterus allows the bacteria to spread.

    • C. 

      C. Infection spreads through the fallopian tubes directly into the peritoneal cavity.

    • D. 

      D. Gangrene in the uterine wall spreads through into the pelvic cavity.

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