Osmosis Jones Text Adventure (As Biology Quiz)

20 Questions | Total Attempts: 75

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Osmosis Quizzes & Trivia

An interactive text adventure quiz in which YOU are Osmosis Jones, the leucocyte hero! Answer all the questions correctly to save your parent body's life!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    LOGIN Enter Username Password >OSMOSIS_JONES ****** W*E*L*C*O*M*E ! You are logged in as Osmosis Jones, Leucocyte Hero. You are somewhere among the natural gates and alleys of the body. You sense a darkness. >INVENTORY You are carrying: Lysozyme Antigen receptors DNA helicase Gene-O-Meter(TM) >LOOK You are in a huge chamber. Above you in the darkness and far away, a rhythm is generating. You know that at any moment the SAN will cause muscular contraction to sweep you through the only exit, which is the aorta. You must be in the:
    • A. 

      Left atrium

    • B. 

      Right atrium

    • C. 

      Left ventricle

    • D. 

      Right ventricle

  • 2. 
    >LOOK The contraction of the heart has swept you through the aorta and you are now powering around the body in the cardiovascular system. You notice in one of the blood vessels a narrowing where fat inside the artery wall has bulged the tissue inwards. You radio headquarters and report:
    • A. 

      An aneurysm

    • B. 

      An atheroma

    • C. 

      An infarction

    • D. 

      A thrombosis

  • 3. 
    Headquarters radio you back immediately: "Put out alert to all units: watch this zone around the clock", because if a clot breaks free and reaches the brain it will cause a:
    • A. 

      Heart attack

    • B. 

      Suffocation situation

    • C. 

      Stupidity event

    • D. 

      Stroke

  • 4. 
    You buzz a call to your buddies and head on your way. In the distance you can see a bunch of fuzzy shapes hanging around the corner of a capillary in a suspicious way. Your pulse races - what if they're dangerous . . .
    • A. 

      Erythrocytes?

    • B. 

      Stem cells?

    • C. 

      Pathogens?

    • D. 

      Gametes?

  • 5. 
    As you get closer you notice that two of them seem to be getting up close and personal - a disgraceful display in a public blood vessel. Worse still, they seem to getting ready to transfer genetic material. You
    • A. 

      Smash their pili with a blow of your fist

    • B. 

      Disable their Golgi apparatus

    • C. 

      Grab them by the contractile vacuoles

    • D. 

      Kick the chlorophyll out of them

  • 6. 
    >LOOK There are plasmids lying here. In fact, the place is a mess. >GET PLASMIDS You put the plasmids in your pack - they may come in useful later. There are still some dodgy looking procaryotes hanging around. You muscle up to one and prepare your membrane for
    • A. 

      Insemination

    • B. 

      Intuition

    • C. 

      Respiration

    • D. 

      Invagination

  • 7. 
    The bacterium squirms as you give it the lysozyme treatment. Not so tough after all, dude. You head on your way. You're feeling a bit wobbly after all that street action - you need a hit of sugar. Checking out the local plasma concentration, you're disappointed to find only disaccharides. Maybe you can make do with some lactose - you suck on a few molecules, but it's no good, the glucose you need is firmly bonded to a
    • A. 

      Galactose unit

    • B. 

      Fructose unit

    • C. 

      Sucrose unit

    • D. 

      Maltose unit

  • 8. 
    >INVENTORY Lysozyme Antigen receptors DNA helicase Gene-O-Meter(TM) Plasmids 48,000 Lactose molecules No wonder your pack is so heavy! >DITCH LACTOSE I don't understand ditch. >DROP LACTOSE You drop 48,000 lactose molecules. If only you'd had something to hydrolyse their bonds . . . but what kind of bonds were they?
    • A. 

      Peptide

    • B. 

      Glycosidic

    • C. 

      Sulphur

    • D. 

      Hydrogen

  • 9. 
    >SEARCH AMY LASE . . . . searching database. . . . No Match for Amy Lase. She musta left town. No dice with the lactose. You slump onto an epithelial cell. C'mon, Jones. You can't stall now. Don't be such a Charlie Bringdown. Amy was sweet but there's other enzymes out there with a curvy active site. Yeah, but Amy never got inhibited. Remember, she had such a great
    • A. 

      Base pair

    • B. 

      Peptide bond

    • C. 

      Polysaccharide chain

    • D. 

      Tertiary structure

  • 10. 
    Next thing you know, a waft of plasma blows a squillion glucose molecules your way. You suddenly feel like a million bucks again, and your mitochondria get all tingly in their
    • A. 

      Cristae

    • B. 

      Ribosomes

    • C. 

      Granae

    • D. 

      Thylakoids

  • 11. 
    But hold up, what's the deal here? A bunch of cheeky red blood cells are giggling about you behind their haemoglobins. And your belt's way too tight - you've got really fat! All that lack of ATP has played Old Harry with your osmotic potential and you're about to burst! You quickly
    • A. 

      Pump iron

    • B. 

      Pump potassium ions out of you

    • C. 

      Pump water out of you

    • D. 

      Pump sodium ions out of you

  • 12. 
    You take a breather and check out one of the bits of broken plasmid from your pack, looking for clues. Luckily you have some DNA helicase and your Gene-O-Meter(TM) and you can unzip the double helix. Yup, this thing replicated semi-conservatively alright - you mentally thank
    • A. 

      Hershey and Chase

    • B. 

      Cobden and Bright

    • C. 

      Meselson and Stahl

    • D. 

      Avery and Griffith

  • 13. 
    Your Gene-O-Meter(TM) bleeps. And not a good bleep either. The red light on the top flashes, too. Uh-oh. This is a code 413. The screen reads: *413 Severe Antibiotic Resistance Gene CBA identified at Locus 782/14. Suggest immediate action*. This ain't good. You'll need to call headquarters, all units, backup, T Cells, Memory Cells and everyone else remotely immunological to combat these bugs before they cause some bad craziness. Safety in numbers, so the best place to be right now is in a
    • A. 

      Lymph node

    • B. 

      Pleural cavity

    • C. 

      Alveolus

    • D. 

      Islet of Langerhans

  • 14. 
    You kick off across the capillary and power into a gap between two epithelial cells, squeezing yourself through with the help of some lubrication from some
    • A. 

      Lipoproteins

    • B. 

      Interstitial fluid

    • C. 

      Glycerol

    • D. 

      Cytoplasmic oil globlets

  • 15. 
    At the lymph node (somewhere in an armpit, ew!) things are busy. Leucocytes and phagocytes are crowding round demanding information, and you toss them some antigens you tucked into your belt when you offed the microbes. But there's a rumour going around . . . about something worse, something no-one's sure about, news just in from the far outposts of the salivary glands, or maybe the taste buds. At that very moment your radio crackles and you hear just one phrase: "Vibrio C . . . Vibrio C . . ." repeated faintly, over and over. If you had any blood, instead of being a part of it, it would be running cold right now. It can mean only one thing: there's an infection of
    • A. 

      Gonorrhea

    • B. 

      HIV

    • C. 

      Cold virus

    • D. 

      Cholera

  • 16. 
    You feverishly (geddit?) try to recall what you know about procaryotes, and about Cholera in particular . . . damage host cells check, produce toxins check, Cholera's toxin does what . . .
    • A. 

      Causes cells to lose ions into the gut lumen

    • B. 

      Causes cells to squirt water into the gut lumen

    • C. 

      Causes cells to rupture into the gut lumen

    • D. 

      Causes blood haemorrhage into the gut lumen

  • 17. 
    You power out of the lymph node, sending other leucocytes reeling as you shoulder them aside. Squeezing into a vein, you're shot back through the heart and after a quick but impossible-to-avoid circuit of the lungs, you're out through the aorta once more and heading for the intestinal capillaries. Once you're in a villus, you squeeze through the epithelium and find yourself in a forest of
    • A. 

      Cilia

    • B. 

      Microglobin

    • C. 

      Keratin

    • D. 

      Microvilli

  • 18. 
    >LOOK You're surrounded by mucus and you struggle out of the microvillus tangle. It looks like you're only just in time - away down the gut you can hear a low, threatening chant and you can see dark shapes approaching. Harsh voices rumble: "Here come the boys that'll give yer cholera, flagellae and toxins all ready ter swallow yer." Or words to that effect. You step out into the lumen and hold up a pseudopod. "Not so fast, procaryote scum - where d'you think you're going?" But you're ignored - and at that moment a gaggle of harmless (or even helpful) E. coli pass by, obscuring your view. When you can see again, the intruders seem to have gone - but then you notice discarded flagellae on the mucus surface, which itself is writhing as they burrow beneath it. You plunge to the attack, grappling in the darkness to find their cell walls, hoping to feel some
    • A. 

      Peptidoglycan

    • B. 

      Chitin

    • C. 

      Cellulose

    • D. 

      Oligosaccharide

  • 19. 
    >LOOK Darkness and mucus. A confused tangle of microvilli and microbes. The first few toxin molecules targeting epithelial cells. Your sense systems are in disorder and you feel out of your depth. But then you get your first feel of a slime capsule and your invaginating membrane sucks in the nastiness that is Vibrio cholerae. Over and over again your lysosomes claim their prey, and bacterial antigen proteins are studded like trophies over your external membrane. Now you need to clone yourself to deal with any other outbreaks, and you quickly replicate your DNA in readiness for
    • A. 

      Meiosis

    • B. 

      Interphase

    • C. 

      Mitosis

    • D. 

      Conjugation

  • 20. 
    >LOOK There's one last Cholera bug trying to make a getaway - as it speeds away from you it sneers over its shoulder, "So long sucker, you won't catch me now, and then it'll be Death by Osmosis, for your host body and then for you!" Gritting your microtubules, you give a last desperate leap after the thug and grab him by an antigen. He struggles furiously as he's torn apart by your top grade lysozyme. "It's Death by Osmosis alright," you chuckle to yourself. "Death by Osmosis Jones!" Who needs a scriptwriter, you think to yourself, looking around for someone to sell the movie rights to. *CONGRATULATIONS* **GAME OVER** ***YOU WIN*** Play again? (Y/N) >QUIT Now please complete this survey with the following question: have you enjoyed this adventure experience?
    • A. 

      It was awesome

    • B. 

      I'd like something a little more related to hard science, please

    • C. 

      It wasn't for me. I prefer macramé

    • D. 

      Yes, and next time I want to take on those ninja spongecakes on Level 14!

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