Organizational Behaviour Chapter 6

35 Questions | Total Attempts: 295

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Organization Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Systematically evaluating the worth of a position within an organization by measuring their required skill, efffort, responsibility, and working conditions.
    • A. 

      Membership and seniority-based rewards

    • B. 

      Financial reward practices

    • C. 

      Job evaluation

    • D. 

      Share options

    • E. 

      Improving reward effectiveness

  • 2. 
    The most fundamental ad applied peformance practice in organizational settings. It is a symbol of success, a reinforcer and motivator, a reflection of one's performance, and a source of reducing anxiety. The value and meaning of money also varies considerably from one person to the next. Cultural values also seem to influence the meaning and value of money.
    • A. 

      Membership and seniority based rewards

    • B. 

      Scientific management

    • C. 

      Financial reward practices

    • D. 

      Job design

    • E. 

      Job specialization

  • 3. 
    Remains the same for everyone, whereas others increase with seniority. Many firms have shifted to performance-based pay. Potentially attracts job applicants and reduces turnover. Does not directly motivate job performance. Discourages poor performers from seeking out work better suited to their abilities. Also has golden handcuffs which weaken job performance by creating continuance commitment.
    • A. 

      Financial reward practices

    • B. 

      Job evaluation

    • C. 

      Gainsharing plans

    • D. 

      Membership and seniority based rewards

    • E. 

      Performance-based rewards

  • 4. 
    Most of these methods give higher value to jobs that require more skill and effort. Motivates employees to compete for promotions, higher status jobs and to raise the value of their own jobs exaggerating job duties and hoarding resources. 
    • A. 

      Job evaluation

    • B. 

      Job status-based rewards

    • C. 

      Competency-based rewards

    • D. 

      Performance-based rewards

    • E. 

      Scientific management

  • 5. 
    Based on the number of this they have acquired.  Skill-based pay is a variation of this in which employees are rewarded for the number of skill modules mastered. Improves workforce flexibility by motivating employees to learn a variety of skills and thereby perform a variety of jobs. Rewards employees who continuously learn skills that will keep them employed. Skill-based pay systems measure specific skills, so they are are usually more objective.
    • A. 

      Performance-based rewards

    • B. 

      Membership and seniority based rewards

    • C. 

      Job status-based rewards

    • D. 

      Competency-based rewards

    • E. 

      Financial reward practices

  • 6. 
    Individual, team, and organizational variable pay plan rewards. Individual rewards - bonuses, commissions, and piece rate systems. Team rewards - individuals can earn bonuses based on the volume and quality of the team's output.  Organizational - employees share productivity gains, receiving bonuses, creating an ownership culture, scorecards to add benefit of aligning rewards to several specific measures of organizational performance. Employees often perceive a weak connection between individual effort and corporate efforts or the value of company shares. The company's share price or profitability is influenced by economic conditions.
    • A. 

      Performance-based rewards

    • B. 

      Job status-based rewards

    • C. 

      Job design

    • D. 

      Improving reward effectiveness

    • E. 

      Competency-based rewards

  • 7. 
    Team-based rewards that calculate bonuses from the work unit's cost savings and productivity improvement.
    • A. 

      Balanced scorecards

    • B. 

      Employee share ownership plans

    • C. 

      Profit-sharing plans

    • D. 

      Share options

    • E. 

      Gainsharing plans

  • 8. 
    A reward system that pays bonuses to employees based on the previous year's level of corporate profits.
    • A. 

      Gainsharing plans

    • B. 

      Profit-sharing plans

    • C. 

      Share options

    • D. 

      Balance scorecards

    • E. 

      Employee share ownership plans

  • 9. 
    A reward system that ecourages employees to buy shares of the company. Encourages employees to buy company shares, usually at a discounted price or a no-interest loan.
    • A. 

      Profit-sharing plans

    • B. 

      Gainsharing plans

    • C. 

      Share options

    • D. 

      Balanced scorecards

    • E. 

      Employee share ownership plans

  • 10. 
    A reward system that gives employees the right to purchase company shares at a future date at a predetermined price.
    • A. 

      Share options

    • B. 

      Employee share ownership plans

    • C. 

      Profit-sharing plans

    • D. 

      Balanced scorecards

    • E. 

      Gainsharing plans

  • 11. 
    A reward system that pays bonuses for improved results on a composite of financial, customer, internal process, and employee factors. A goal-oriented performance measurement system that rewards people, typically executives, for improving performance on a composite of financial, customer, and internal processes.
    • A. 

      Employee sharing plans

    • B. 

      Share options

    • C. 

      Balanced scorecards

    • D. 

      Gainsharing plans

    • E. 

      Profit-sharing plans

  • 12. 
    As the high performance work practices perspective of organizational effectiveness advises, the top performing companies are more likely to have performance-based rewards. Link rewards to performance, ensure that rewards are relevant, use team rewards for interdependent jobs, ensure that rewards are valued, and watch out for unintended consequences.
    • A. 

      Empowerment

    • B. 

      Job design

    • C. 

      Membership and seniority-based rewards

    • D. 

      Job enlargement

    • E. 

      Improving reward effectiveness

  • 13. 
    The process of assigning tasks to a job, including the interdependency of those tasks with other jobs. Work is performed efficiently but employees are motivated and engaged.
    • A. 

      Scientific managment

    • B. 

      Job specialization

    • C. 

      Task identity

    • D. 

      Job rotation

    • E. 

      Job design

  • 14. 
    The result of division of laour in which each job includes a subset of the tasks required to complete the product or service. Product or services are subdivided into separate jobs assigned to different people. Each job includes a narrow subset of tasks.
    • A. 

      Job specialization

    • B. 

      Job design

    • C. 

      Job enrichment

    • D. 

      Job rotation

    • E. 

      Job enlargement

  • 15. 
    Systematically partitioning work into its smallest elements and stanardizing tasks to achieve maximum efficiency. Includes training, goal setting, and work incentives. Improves work efficiency. Some jobs become tedious, trivial, and socially isolating. Often reduces work quality. Ignores the motivational potential of jobs. The ability to master the job decreases. Most people can eventually perform the job tasks efficiently, yet the work is interesting.
    • A. 

      Job design

    • B. 

      Job characteristics model

    • C. 

      Scientific management

    • D. 

      Task significance

    • E. 

      Task identity

  • 16. 
    States that employees are primarily motivated by growth and esteem needs, not by lower-level needs.
    • A. 

      Mental imagery

    • B. 

      Improving reward effectiveness

    • C. 

      Motivator-hygiene thory

    • D. 

      Autonomy

    • E. 

      Job enrichment

  • 17. 
    Relates the motivational properties of jobs to specific personal and organizational consequences.
    • A. 

      Autonomy

    • B. 

      Motivator-hygiene theory

    • C. 

      Job characteristics model

    • D. 

      Job evaluation

    • E. 

      Empowerment

  • 18. 
    The extent to which employees must use different skills and talents to perform tasks within their job.
    • A. 

      Skill variety

    • B. 

      Task identity

    • C. 

      Task significance

    • D. 

      Autonomy

    • E. 

      Job characteristics model

  • 19. 
    The degree to which a job requires completion of a whole or an identifiable piece of work.
    • A. 

      Autonomy

    • B. 

      Task identity

    • C. 

      Task significance

    • D. 

      Skill variety

    • E. 

      Job charastics model

  • 20. 
    The degree to which the job has a substantial impact on the organization and/or larger society.
    • A. 

      Motivator-hygiene theory

    • B. 

      Job characteristics model

    • C. 

      Job enlargement

    • D. 

      Task significance

    • E. 

      Task identity

  • 21. 
    The degree to which a job gives employees the freedom, independence, and discretion to schedule their work and determine their procedures used in completing it.
    • A. 

      Task significance

    • B. 

      Autonomy

    • C. 

      Task identity

    • D. 

      Skill variety

    • E. 

      Job enrichment

  • 22. 
    The practice of moving employees from one job to another. Minimizes health risks from reptitive strain and heavy lifting, supports multiskilling, and reduces the boredom of highly repetitive jobs.
    • A. 

      Empowerment

    • B. 

      Job rotation

    • C. 

      Job enlargement

    • D. 

      Job enrichment

    • E. 

      Motivator-hygiene theory

  • 23. 
    Increasing the number of tasks employees perform within their job. Adds tasks to an existing job. Video journalists represent a clear example of this.
    • A. 

      Job characteristics model

    • B. 

      Job enrichment

    • C. 

      Job rotation

    • D. 

      Job design

    • E. 

      Job enlargement

  • 24. 
    Occurs when employees are given more responsibility for scheduling, coordinating, and planning their own work.  Combining highly interdependent tasks into one job - a natural grouping approach such as video journalists because it naturally groups tasks together to complete an entire product. A second strategy, called establishing client relationships, involves putting employees in direct contact with their clients.
    • A. 

      Job design

    • B. 

      Job enrichment

    • C. 

      Job enlargement

    • D. 

      Job evaluation

    • E. 

      Job rotation

  • 25. 
    A psychological concept in which people experience more self-determination, meaning, competence, and impact regarding their role in the organization. At the individual level, employees must possess the necessary competencies to be able to perform the work. Employees are more determined when working in jobs with a high degree of autonomy and experience more meaningfulness when working in jobs with high levels of identity and task significance. Influenced by organizational and work context factors and where information and other resources are easily accessible.
    • A. 

      Mental imagery

    • B. 

      Self-leadership

    • C. 

      Scientific management

    • D. 

      Self-talk

    • E. 

      Empowerment

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