Head And Neck Anatomy Final Practice Part II

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Anatomy Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    The brainstem of the central nervous system consists of which structures?

    • A.

      Cerebrum, cerebellum, pons, and medulla

    • B.

      Medulla, cerebrum, midbrain, and pons

    • C.

      Medulla, pons, and midbrain

    • D.

      Midbrain, ganglia, and nerves

    Correct Answer
    C. Medulla, pons, and midbrain
    Explanation
    The brainstem is a crucial part of the central nervous system and is responsible for many vital functions. It consists of three main structures: the medulla, pons, and midbrain. The medulla is located at the base of the brainstem and controls important functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. The pons is located above the medulla and plays a role in relaying messages between the cerebrum and cerebellum. The midbrain is the uppermost part of the brainstem and is involved in various sensory and motor functions. Therefore, the correct answer is medulla, pons, and midbrain.

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  • 2. 

    The central nervous system consists of which two of the following structures?

    • A.

      Spinal cord and peripheral nervous system

    • B.

      Brain and spinal cord

    • C.

      Autonomic and somatic nervous system

    • D.

      Brain and autonomic nervous system

    Correct Answer
    B. Brain and spinal cord
    Explanation
    The central nervous system is composed of the brain and spinal cord. These two structures are responsible for coordinating and controlling the activities of the body. The brain is the control center of the nervous system and is involved in processes such as thinking, memory, and sensory perception. The spinal cord acts as a pathway for transmitting signals between the brain and the rest of the body. Together, the brain and spinal cord play a crucial role in regulating bodily functions and responding to external stimuli.

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  • 3. 

    To what division of the nervous system does a nerve cell belong to if it leads from the eye to the brain carrying visual information?

    • A.

      Central nervous system

    • B.

      Medulla and pons

    • C.

      Afferent nervous system

    • D.

      Efferent nervous system

    Correct Answer
    C. Afferent nervous system
    Explanation
    A nerve cell that carries visual information from the eye to the brain belongs to the afferent nervous system. The afferent nervous system is responsible for transmitting sensory information from the body to the central nervous system, which includes the brain and spinal cord. In this case, the nerve cell is carrying visual information, which is a sensory input, from the eye to the brain. Therefore, it belongs to the afferent nervous system.

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  • 4. 

    An efferent nerve with the nervous system is known to carry information

    • A.

      From the periphery of the body to the brain (or spinal cord)

    • B.

      Such as taste or pain to the spinal cord

    • C.

      Such as proprioception to the brain

    • D.

      Away from the brain (or spinal cord) to the periphery of the body

    Correct Answer
    D. Away from the brain (or spinal cord) to the periphery of the body
    Explanation
    Efferent nerves in the nervous system are responsible for carrying information away from the brain or spinal cord to the periphery of the body. This means that they transmit signals from the central nervous system to the muscles or organs, allowing for movement or response to stimuli. These efferent nerves play a crucial role in motor function and the coordination of bodily activities.

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  • 5. 

    Through which of the following foramina does the facial nerve pass through the skull

    • A.

      Foramen rotundum

    • B.

      Foramen ovale

    • C.

      Jugular foramen

    • D.

      Stylomastoid foramen

    Correct Answer
    D. Stylomastoid foramen
    Explanation
    The facial nerve passes through the stylomastoid foramen in the skull. This foramen is located at the base of the skull, behind the ear. It is an opening that allows the facial nerve to exit the skull and innervate the muscles of the face. The other options listed (foramen rotundum, foramen ovale, jugular foramen) are not correct because they do not serve as passageways for the facial nerve.

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  • 6. 

    Which of the following cranial nerves is directly involved in Bell palsy?

    • A.

      Trigeminal nerve

    • B.

      Facial nerve

    • C.

      Glossopharyngeal nerve

    • D.

      Vagus nerve

    Correct Answer
    B. Facial nerve
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the Facial nerve. Bell palsy is a condition characterized by sudden weakness or paralysis of the muscles on one side of the face, and it is caused by inflammation or damage to the Facial nerve. The Facial nerve is responsible for controlling the muscles of facial expression, as well as the secretion of tears and saliva. When this nerve is affected, it can lead to the characteristic symptoms of Bell palsy.

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  • 7. 

    Which of the following nerve and muscle pairs is a CORRECT match?

    • A.

      Long buccal nerve, buccinator muscle

    • B.

      Accessory nerve, platysma muscle

    • C.

      Hypoglossal nerve, intrinsic tongue muscles

    • D.

      Auriculotemporal nerve, temporalis muscle

    Correct Answer
    C. Hypoglossal nerve, intrinsic tongue muscles
    Explanation
    The hypoglossal nerve is responsible for the motor innervation of the intrinsic muscles of the tongue, which are the muscles located within the tongue itself. This nerve controls the fine movements of the tongue, such as shaping it for speech and swallowing. Therefore, the pairing of the hypoglossal nerve with the intrinsic tongue muscles is correct.

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  • 8. 

    Which of the following nerve and innervation pairs is a CORRECT match?

    • A.

      Facial nerve, parotid salivary gland

    • B.

      Chorda tympani, sublingual salivary gland

    • C.

      Vagus nerve, TMJ

    • D.

      Lingual nerve, base of tongue

    Correct Answer
    B. Chorda tympani, sublingual salivary gland
    Explanation
    The chorda tympani is a branch of the facial nerve that provides innervation to the sublingual salivary gland. This means that the correct match is chorda tympani, sublingual salivary gland.

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  • 9. 

    Which of the following cranial nerves has fibers that provide crossover-innervation to the contralateral side in the skull before continuing into the brain?

    • A.

      Facial nerve

    • B.

      Optic nerve

    • C.

      Trochlear nerve

    • D.

      Vestibulocochlear nerve

    Correct Answer
    B. Optic nerve
    Explanation
    The optic nerve is the correct answer because it is the only cranial nerve that provides crossover-innervation to the contralateral side in the skull before continuing into the brain. The optic nerve carries visual information from the retina to the brain, and at the optic chiasm, some of the fibers from each eye cross over to the opposite side. This allows for the integration of visual information from both eyes in the brain. The other cranial nerves listed do not have this characteristic.

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  • 10. 

    Which of the following cranial nerves carries taste sensation for the base of the tongue?

    • A.

      Trigeminal nerve

    • B.

      Vagus nerve

    • C.

      Facial nerve

    • D.

      Glossopharyngeal nerve

    Correct Answer
    D. Glossopharyngeal nerve
    Explanation
    The glossopharyngeal nerve carries taste sensation for the base of the tongue. This nerve is responsible for transmitting taste information from the posterior third of the tongue, as well as providing sensory innervation to the pharynx and tonsils. The trigeminal nerve carries sensation from the face, the vagus nerve is involved in various functions such as swallowing and speaking, and the facial nerve is responsible for taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue.

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  • 11. 

    In which of the following regions of the head and neck is the trigeminal ganglion located?

    • A.

      Superior to the deep lobe of the submandibular salivary gland

    • B.

      Anterior surface of the petrous part of the temporal bone

    • C.

      Posterior surface of the maxillary tuberosity of the maxilla

    • D.

      Anterior to the infraorbital foramen of the maxilla

    Correct Answer
    B. Anterior surface of the petrous part of the temporal bone
    Explanation
    The trigeminal ganglion is located on the anterior surface of the petrous part of the temporal bone.

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  • 12. 

    The posterior belly of the digastric muscle is innervated by branches from which of the following nerves?

    • A.

      Facial

    • B.

      Mylohyoid

    • C.

      Buccal (long)

    • D.

      Maxillary

    Correct Answer
    A. Facial
    Explanation
    The posterior belly of the digastric muscle is innervated by branches from the facial nerve. The facial nerve is responsible for controlling the muscles of facial expression, including the digastric muscle.

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  • 13. 

    The anterior belly of the digastric muscle is innervated by branches from which of the following nerves?

    • A.

      Facial

    • B.

      Mylohyoid nerve

    • C.

      Buccal (long)

    • D.

      Maxillary

    Correct Answer
    B. Mylohyoid nerve
    Explanation
    The mylohyoid nerve innervates the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. The mylohyoid nerve is a branch of the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V). It supplies motor innervation to the mylohyoid muscle, which is responsible for elevating the hyoid bone during swallowing and speaking. The digastric muscle has two bellies, the anterior and posterior, and the mylohyoid nerve specifically innervates the anterior belly.

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  • 14. 

    Which of the following nerves listed below is considered part of the opthalmic nerve?

    • A.

      Nasociliary nerve

    • B.

      Maxillary nerve

    • C.

      Zygomaticotemporal nerve

    • D.

      Zygomaticaofacial nerve

    Correct Answer
    A. Nasociliary nerve
    Explanation
    The nasociliary nerve is considered part of the ophthalmic nerve. The ophthalmic nerve is one of the three branches of the trigeminal nerve, which is responsible for sensory innervation of the face. The nasociliary nerve specifically provides sensory innervation to the nasal cavity, the skin of the nose, and the conjunctiva of the eye. It also carries parasympathetic fibers that control the constriction of the pupil. The maxillary nerve, zygomaticotemporal nerve, and zygomaticofacial nerve are all branches of the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve and are not considered part of the ophthalmic nerve.

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  • 15. 

    Which of the following nerves is located within the mandibular canal?

    • A.

      Lingual nerve

    • B.

      Mylohyoid nerve

    • C.

      Inferior alveolar nerve

    • D.

      Masseteric nerve

    Correct Answer
    C. Inferior alveolar nerve
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the inferior alveolar nerve. This nerve is located within the mandibular canal, which is a tunnel-like structure in the mandible (lower jaw). The inferior alveolar nerve is responsible for providing sensory innervation to the lower teeth, chin, and lower lip. It also supplies motor innervation to the muscles of mastication (chewing).

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  • 16. 

    Which one of the following nerves exits the foramen ovale

    • A.

      Chorda tympani of the facial nerve

    • B.

      Greater petrosal nerve of the facial nerve

    • C.

      Opthalmic nerve of the trigeminal nerve

    • D.

      Motor root of the trigeminal nerve

    Correct Answer
    D. Motor root of the trigeminal nerve
    Explanation
    The motor root of the trigeminal nerve exits the foramen ovale. The trigeminal nerve is responsible for motor functions, such as chewing, and it exits the skull through the foramen ovale. The other options listed are not associated with the foramen ovale. The chorda tympani of the facial nerve exits the skull through the petrotympanic fissure, the greater petrosal nerve of the facial nerve exits through the foramen lacerum, and the ophthalmic nerve of the trigeminal nerve exits through the superior orbital fissure.

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  • 17. 

    Which of the following cranial nerves and its motor function is involved when a patient protrudes the tongue and a deviation to the right side is noted?

    • A.

      V

    • B.

      VII

    • C.

      X

    • D.

      XII

    Correct Answer
    D. XII
    Explanation
    The correct answer is XII. The hypoglossal nerve (cranial nerve XII) controls the motor function of the tongue. When a patient protrudes the tongue and a deviation to the right side is noted, it suggests that there is a weakness or paralysis of the right side of the tongue, which is innervated by the right hypoglossal nerve.

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  • 18. 

    Which of the following nerves exits the skull through the foramen ovale?

    • A.

      Facial

    • B.

      Opthalmic

    • C.

      Maxillary

    • D.

      Mandibular

    Correct Answer
    D. Mandibular
    Explanation
    The mandibular nerve is the correct answer because it is the only nerve listed that exits the skull through the foramen ovale. The facial nerve exits through the stylomastoid foramen, the ophthalmic nerve exits through the superior orbital fissure, and the maxillary nerve exits through the foramen rotundum. Only the mandibular nerve passes through the foramen ovale.

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  • 19. 

    Which of the following nerves serves the pulp of the mandibular molars?

    • A.

      Lingual nerve

    • B.

      Buccal nerve (long)

    • C.

      Mental nerve

    • D.

      Inferior alveolar nerve

    Correct Answer
    D. Inferior alveolar nerve
    Explanation
    The inferior alveolar nerve serves the pulp of the mandibular molars. This nerve is a branch of the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve and provides sensory innervation to the lower teeth, lower lip, and chin. It enters the mandibular canal and travels to the mandibular molars, where it supplies the pulp with sensory fibers. The lingual nerve supplies the lingual surfaces of the mandibular teeth, the buccal nerve (long) supplies the buccal gingiva, and the mental nerve supplies the lower lip and chin.

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  • 20. 

    Which nerve may in some cases also serve as an afferent nerve for the mandibular first molar, which needs to be considered when there is failure of the inferior alveolar local anesthetic block?

    • A.

      Mylohyoid nerve

    • B.

      Posterior superior alveolar nerve

    • C.

      Anterior middle superior alveolar nerve

    • D.

      Glossopharyngeal nerve

    Correct Answer
    A. Mylohyoid nerve
    Explanation
    The mylohyoid nerve may serve as an afferent nerve for the mandibular first molar. This is important to consider when there is a failure of the inferior alveolar local anesthetic block. The mylohyoid nerve supplies sensation to the mylohyoid muscle and the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. It branches off from the inferior alveolar nerve, which is responsible for the majority of the sensory innervation of the mandibular teeth. Therefore, if the inferior alveolar nerve block fails to provide adequate anesthesia to the mandibular first molar, the mylohyoid nerve may also need to be anesthetized to ensure complete numbness in the area.

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  • 21. 

    Which of the following nerves is NOT anesthetized during an IA local anesthetic block?

    • A.

      Buccal nerve

    • B.

      Lingual nerve

    • C.

      Mental nerve

    • D.

      Incisive nerve

    Correct Answer
    A. Buccal nerve
    Explanation
    During an IA (inferior alveolar) local anesthetic block, the buccal nerve is not anesthetized. The IA block aims to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve, which provides sensory innervation to the lower teeth and surrounding tissues. The buccal nerve, on the other hand, supplies sensory innervation to the buccal gingiva and mucosa of the mandibular molars, and is not directly affected by the IA block.

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  • 22. 

    Which of the following local anesthetic blocks uses pressure anesthesia during an infraorbital local anesthetic block?

    • A.

      PSA

    • B.

      Infraorbital

    • C.

      Greater palatine

    • D.

      IA

    • E.

      Buccal

    Correct Answer
    C. Greater palatine
    Explanation
    The correct answer is greater palatine. In an infraorbital local anesthetic block, pressure anesthesia is used during the administration of the greater palatine block. This block involves injecting the anesthetic solution into the greater palatine foramen, which is located on the hard palate. The pressure anesthesia technique helps to ensure that the anesthetic solution is evenly distributed and effectively numbs the area.

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  • 23. 

    Which of the following is an important landmark to locate before performing an IA?

    • A.

      Coronoid notch

    • B.

      Tongue

    • C.

      Buccal fat pad

    • D.

      Mental foramen

    Correct Answer
    A. Coronoid notch
    Explanation
    The coronoid notch is an important landmark to locate before performing an IA (inferior alveolar) procedure. The IA is a dental nerve block used for anesthesia in the lower jaw. The coronoid notch is a small indentation on the anterior border of the ramus of the mandible. Locating this landmark is crucial as it helps the dentist identify the correct injection site for the IA procedure, ensuring effective anesthesia and minimizing potential complications.

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  • 24. 

    If the MB root of the max first molar is NOT anesthetized by a PSA the dental professional should administer a

    • A.

      PSA

    • B.

      Long buccal block

    • C.

      MSA

    • D.

      Nasopalatine

    Correct Answer
    C. MSA
    Explanation
    If the MB root of the max first molar is not anesthetized by a PSA (posterior superior alveolar nerve block), the dental professional should administer an MSA (middle superior alveolar nerve block). This is because the MSA block can provide anesthesia to the mesiobuccal (MB) root of the max first molar, which the PSA block may not fully cover. The MSA block is an alternative technique that can target the specific area that needs to be anesthetized in this case.

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  • 25. 

    The injection side for the greater palatine local anesthetic block is usually located on the palate near which of the following?

    • A.

      Max first premolar

    • B.

      Max second or third molar

    • C.

      Incisive papilla

    • D.

      Median palatine suture

    Correct Answer
    B. Max second or third molar
    Explanation
    The injection side for the greater palatine local anesthetic block is usually located on the palate near the max second or third molar. This is because the greater palatine nerve, which supplies the posterior part of the hard palate, emerges from the greater palatine foramen located near the maxillary second or third molar. By injecting the anesthetic near this area, the nerve can be effectively blocked, providing anesthesia to the posterior part of the hard palate.

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  • 26. 

    If an extraction of a permanent max lateral incisor is scheduled, which of the following local anesthetic blocks can be administered instead of the infraorbital block?

    • A.

      PSA

    • B.

      MSA

    • C.

      Nasopalatine block

    • D.

      Greater palatine block

    Correct Answer
    C. Nasopalatine block
    Explanation
    The nasopalatine block can be administered instead of the infraorbital block when extracting a permanent maxillary lateral incisor. The nasopalatine block is a local anesthetic technique that targets the nasopalatine nerve, which supplies the anterior portion of the hard palate and the palatal gingiva of the maxillary anterior teeth. By administering this block, the dentist can achieve effective anesthesia in the area without the need for the infraorbital block, which targets the infraorbital nerve.

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  • 27. 

    Transient facial paralysis can occur with which INCORRECTLY administered local anesthetic block?

    • A.

      PSA

    • B.

      MSA

    • C.

      Nasopalatine

    • D.

      IA

    • E.

      Mental

    Correct Answer
    D. IA
    Explanation
    Transient facial paralysis can occur with an incorrectly administered inferior alveolar (IA) local anesthetic block. The IA block is used to anesthetize the lower teeth and surrounding tissues, but if it is administered incorrectly, it can result in paralysis of the facial muscles. This can happen if the needle is inserted too deeply or if the anesthetic is deposited directly into a nerve bundle, causing temporary facial paralysis.

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  • 28. 

    Which local anesthetic block anesthetizes the largest intraoral area?

    • A.

      Buccal block

    • B.

      IA

    • C.

      Mental block

    • D.

      Incisive block

    Correct Answer
    B. IA
    Explanation
    The IA (inferior alveolar) block anesthetizes the largest intraoral area. This block is commonly used in dentistry to numb the lower jaw, lower teeth, and surrounding tissues. It is administered by injecting the anesthetic near the mandibular foramen, which allows the anesthetic to reach the inferior alveolar nerve and provide effective numbness in a large area of the mouth.

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  • 29. 

    Which of these situations can occur if bone is contacted early during an IA?

    • A.

      Needle tip is located too far anteriorly on the ramus

    • B.

      Needle tip is located too far posteriorly on the max tuberosity

    • C.

      Syringe barrel is over the max post. teeth

    • D.

      Syringe barrel is over the mand. post. teeth

    Correct Answer
    A. Needle tip is located too far anteriorly on the ramus
    Explanation
    If the needle tip is located too far anteriorly on the ramus during an IA (inferior alveolar) injection, it can cause a situation where the bone is contacted early. This means that the needle has hit the bone before reaching the desired target area. This can lead to ineffective anesthesia or incomplete numbness in the intended area, as the anesthetic solution may not reach the nerve properly. It may also cause discomfort or pain for the patient during the injection.

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  • 30. 

    An injection on the facial surface of the anterior maxilla is the MOST successful when using local infiltrations of local anesthetic

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Local infiltrations of local anesthetic are the most successful method for injecting the facial surface of the anterior maxilla. This means that injecting the anesthetic directly into the area where it is needed, rather than using other methods such as nerve blocks, is the most effective approach.

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  • 31. 

    If working within the mandibular anterior sextant, which local anesthetic block is MOST successful and comfortable for the patient?

    • A.

      Unilateral PSA

    • B.

      Bilateral lingual

    • C.

      Bilateral IA

    • D.

      Bilateral incisive

    Correct Answer
    D. Bilateral incisive
    Explanation
    The bilateral incisive block is the most successful and comfortable local anesthetic block for the patient when working within the mandibular anterior sextant. This block provides anesthesia to the mandibular incisors, canines, and premolars, ensuring effective pain control during dental procedures in this area. Additionally, the bilateral incisive block is known for its high success rate and patient comfort, making it the preferred choice in this scenario.

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  • 32. 

    To have complete anesthesia of the maxillary quadrant, which of the following local anesthetic blocks needs to be administered along with the AMSA?

    • A.

      MSA

    • B.

      Nasopalatine

    • C.

      PSA

    • D.

      ASA

    Correct Answer
    C. PSA
    Explanation
    To achieve complete anesthesia of the maxillary quadrant, the PSA (Posterior Superior Alveolar) block needs to be administered along with the AMSA (Anterior Middle Superior Alveolar) block. The PSA block targets the posterior superior alveolar nerve, which supplies the molars and premolars in the maxillary quadrant. The AMSA block targets the anterior middle superior alveolar nerve, which supplies the anterior teeth in the maxillary quadrant. By combining both blocks, both the anterior and posterior regions of the maxillary quadrant can be effectively anesthetized.

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  • 33. 

    Which of the following can serve as a landmark for the AMSA local anesthetic block?

    • A.

      Incisive papilla

    • B.

      Premolar teeth

    • C.

      Lesser palatine foramen

    • D.

      Canine eminence

    Correct Answer
    B. Premolar teeth
    Explanation
    The premolar teeth can serve as a landmark for the AMSA (Anterior Middle Superior Alveolar) local anesthetic block. This technique involves injecting anesthetic near the apex of the maxillary second premolar tooth to provide anesthesia to the maxillary incisors, canines, and premolars on the same side. By identifying the premolar teeth, the dentist can accurately administer the anesthetic and ensure effective numbing of the targeted area. The other options mentioned (incisive papilla, lesser palatine foramen, and canine eminence) are not specifically associated with the AMSA block.

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  • 34. 

    Which of the following lymph nodes have BOTH superficial and deep nodes?

    • A.

      Facial nodes

    • B.

      Buccal nodes

    • C.

      Parotid nodes

    • D.

      Occipital nodes

    Correct Answer
    C. Parotid nodes
    Explanation
    The parotid nodes have both superficial and deep nodes. The parotid nodes are located in the parotid gland, which is the largest salivary gland in the body. These nodes are responsible for draining lymph from the superficial and deep areas of the face, including the cheeks, temples, and scalp. This dual drainage system allows for efficient removal of lymph from both superficial and deep tissues in the facial region.

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  • 35. 

    Which of the following structures leave each individual lymph node at the hilus?

    • A.

      Lymphatic ducts

    • B.

      Tonsillar tissue

    • C.

      Efferent lymphatic vessels

    Correct Answer
    C. Efferent lymphatic vessels
    Explanation
    Efferent lymphatic vessels leave each individual lymph node at the hilus. These vessels are responsible for carrying lymph fluid away from the lymph node and towards the next lymph node or eventually back into the bloodstream. The lymph fluid contains waste products, pathogens, and immune cells that have been filtered and processed by the lymph node. By leaving at the hilus, the efferent lymphatic vessels ensure that the filtered lymph can continue its journey through the lymphatic system.

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  • 36. 

    Which of the following lymph nodes are considered to be subdivisions of the facial lymph nodes?

    • A.

      Malar

    • B.

      Buccal

    • C.

      Infraorbital

    • D.

      Zygomatic

    • E.

      Nasolabial

    • F.

      Mandibular

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Malar
    B. Buccal
    E. Nasolabial
    F. Mandibular
    Explanation
    The malar, buccal, nasolabial, and mandibular lymph nodes are considered to be subdivisions of the facial lymph nodes. These lymph nodes are located in different areas of the face and drain lymphatic fluid from specific regions, such as the cheeks, nose, and lower jaw. They play a crucial role in filtering and removing waste products, pathogens, and other harmful substances from the facial tissues.

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  • 37. 

    Which of the following lymph nodes extends from the base of the skull to the root of the neck?

    • A.

      Facial nodes

    • B.

      Deep cervical nodes

    • C.

      Occipital nodes

    • D.

      Jugulodigastric nodes

    Correct Answer
    B. Deep cervical nodes
    Explanation
    The deep cervical nodes are a group of lymph nodes that extend from the base of the skull to the root of the neck. They are located along the internal jugular vein and are responsible for draining lymph from the head, neck, and upper chest. These nodes play a crucial role in the immune system's defense against infections and diseases in the upper body.

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  • 38. 

    Into which area does the thoracic duct empty?

    • A.

      Aortic arch of the body

    • B.

      Superior vena cava of the body

    • C.

      Junction of the right and left brachiocephalic veins

    • D.

      Junction of the left internal jugular and subclavian veins

    Correct Answer
    D. Junction of the left internal jugular and subclavian veins
    Explanation
    The thoracic duct is the largest lymphatic vessel in the body and it plays a crucial role in returning lymph fluid back to the bloodstream. It drains lymph from the lower limbs, abdomen, left side of the thorax, left upper limb, and left side of the head and neck. The thoracic duct empties into the junction of the left internal jugular and subclavian veins. This is where the lymph fluid is returned to the bloodstream, allowing it to be circulated throughout the body again.

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  • Current Version
  • Mar 17, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Dec 07, 2014
    Quiz Created by
    Kelly
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