Lesson 3 Chapter 10 #2 Researching The Polity Chapter Quiz

25 Questions | Total Attempts: 216

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Lesson 3 Chapter 10 #2 Researching The Polity Chapter Quiz

Remember, a variable is a characteristic or property that differs in value from one unit of analysis to another. Variables are concepts that you operationalize, or measure, in a sample of data. In short, a variable is a measured concept. Concept Measurement Variable


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The General Social Survey asked respondents to assess their own health as excellent, good, fair or poor. The level of measurement of this variable is
    • A. 

      Ordinal

    • B. 

      Nominal

    • C. 

      Interval

    • D. 

      Ratio

  • 2. 
    A student conducted a survey that asked respondents to identify their race as white, African American, or Other. The level if measurement of this variable is 
    • A. 

      Nominal

    • B. 

      Ordinal

    • C. 

      Interval

    • D. 

      Ratio

  • 3. 
    Avgtemp is a variable included in a data set of America's fifty largest cities. the variable represents the acerage annual temperature (in Fahrenheit) of each city. The level of measurement of this variable is
    • A. 

      Nominal

    • B. 

      Interval

    • C. 

      Ordinal

    • D. 

      Ratio

  • 4. 
    Suppose that a researcher conducting a survey based on a sample of government workers asks respondents their annual incomes using these values: $20,000 or less; $20,000 through $60,000;$60,000 or more. A problem with this set of values is that
    • A. 

      They are not continuous

    • B. 

      They are measured at the nominal level

    • C. 

      They are population data

    • D. 

      They are not collectively exhaustive

    • E. 

      They are not mutually exclusive

  • 5. 
    _______________ scales incorporate an empirical test of unidimensionality and are cumulative.  
    • A. 

      Likert

    • B. 

      Guttman

    • C. 

      Composite

    • D. 

      Simple

  • 6. 
    ___________________ refers to the extent to which a measurement procedure consistently measures whatever it measures.
    • A. 

      Unidimensionality

    • B. 

      Reliability

    • C. 

      Validity

    • D. 

      Correlation

  • 7. 
    There are two types of _________________ measurement: interval measurement and ratio measurement.
    • A. 

      Metric

    • B. 

      Normative

    • C. 

      Unidimensionality

    • D. 

      Central tendency

  • 8. 
    Measurement ___________ is concerned with the effectiveness of the measuring instrument and the extent that the instrument reflect the actual activity or behavior one wants to study.  
    • A. 

      Unidimensionality

    • B. 

      Reliability

    • C. 

      Validity

    • D. 

      Correlation

  • 9. 
    ____________ is an attempt to enhance the reliability and validity of measurement by using multiple and overlapping measurement strategies.
    • A. 

      Likert scaling

    • B. 

      Guttman scaling

    • C. 

      Triangulation

    • D. 

      Unidimensionality scaling

  • 10. 
    A(N) _____________ variable takes on only certain values within its range
    • A. 

      Discrete

    • B. 

      Antecedent

    • C. 

      Continuous

    • D. 

      Intervening

  • 11. 
    ________________writes that "measurement is the quantifying of any phenomenon, substantial or insubstantial, and involves a comparison with a standard"
    • A. 

      Anthony Downs

    • B. 

      Paul D. Leedy

    • C. 

      Edward Olson

    • D. 

      Isaac Newton

  • 12. 
    ____________are the weakest or least precise level of measurement.
    • A. 

      Ordinal measures

    • B. 

      Interval measures

    • C. 

      Nominal measures

    • D. 

      Ration measures

  • 13. 
    _________ measures lack any sense of relative size or magnitude; they only allow you to say that the classes of a variable are different. There is no mathematical relationship between the classes.
    • A. 

      Interval

    • B. 

      Nominal

    • C. 

      Ratio

    • D. 

      Ordinal

  • 14. 
    When coding categories of each  unit of analysis fit into one and only one category. Example1.) 0-102. )11-203.) 21-30
    • A. 

      Virtually exclusive

    • B. 

      Really exclusive

    • C. 

      Mutually exclusive

    • D. 

      Exclusive

  • 15. 
    The coding scheme that fits every response and never ends. Example1.) $0-$25,0002.) $25,001-$50,0003.) $50,000 or above
    • A. 

      Mutually exclusive

    • B. 

      Infinite

    • C. 

      Exhaustive

    • D. 

      Range

  • 16. 
    _________ level data is reported in the ten-year census. More specific examples include a state's population, the number of senior citizens living in cities, and the number of African Americans living in a state. All percentages and proportions are also _______ because we start out with ______ measurements to derive them.
    • A. 

      Ordinal

    • B. 

      Nominal

    • C. 

      Interval

    • D. 

      Ratio

  • 17. 
     When collecting your data, you should try to measure concepts at the ______________ level possible. This will permit enhanced mathematical manipulation and more sophisticated statistical analysis.
    • A. 

      Lowest

    • B. 

      Highest

    • C. 

      Mid-point

    • D. 

      Earliest

  • 18. 
    __________-level variables are always discrete.
    • A. 

      Ratio

    • B. 

      Ordinal

    • C. 

      Nominal

    • D. 

      Interval

  • 19. 
    __________-level variables can be continuous or discrete.
    • A. 

      Ordinal

    • B. 

      Interval

    • C. 

      Ratio

    • D. 

      Nominal

  • 20. 
    _____________involves the use of multiple observers for the same research activity. It reduces potential bias that might come from a single observer. Examples include the use of several interviewers, analysts, and decision makers.
    • A. 

      Methodological triangulation

    • B. 

      Multiple triangulation

    • C. 

      Investigator triangulation

    • D. 

      Observer triangulation

  • 21. 
     ______________combines two or more information collection methods in the study of a single concept. It uses the strengths of various methods. For example, you might use surveys to gather information about a phenomenon. To complement this method, you might discretely observe and chart the activities of your subjects. This method can compensate for the possible bias that could result from interviews and surveys.
    • A. 

      Investigator triangulation

    • B. 

      Methodological triangulation

    • C. 

      Immediate triangulation

    • D. 

      Collection triangulation

  • 22. 
    __________ involve the principle of unidimensionality, which implies that the items comprising the _______ reflect a single dimension or concept.
    • A. 

      Measurement

    • B. 

      Indexes

    • C. 

      Scales

    • D. 

      Concept

  • 23. 
    This following is an example of a ________? The United States Supreme Court has ruled that no state or local government may require the reading of the Lord’s Prayer or Bible verses in public schools. The Court’s decision was correct.1) Strongly disagree2) Disagree3) Undecided4) Agree5) Strongly agree
      • A. 

        Ratio Scale

      • B. 

        Guttman Scale

      • C. 

        Likert Scale

      • D. 

        Ordinal Scale

    • 24. 
      True or False: Likert scales have some obvious advantages. They are relatively easy to administer, they provide a more rational basis for item selection, and they provide a range of alternative responses to each question
      • A. 

        True

      • B. 

        False

    • 25. 
      True or False: Likert scales are more accurate then Guttman scales?
      • A. 

        True

      • B. 

        False

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