MAT September 2012: Language Comprehension Question Paper

40 Questions | Total Attempts: 1879

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MAT September 2012: Language Comprehension Question Paper

Find here Solved MAT September 2012 Question Paper on Language Comprehension. It has 40 questions in it.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Directions: In this question choose the option which can be substituted for the given words. To cancel (a law, agreement, etc.) formally or officially
    • A. 

      Terminate

    • B. 

      Adjure

    • C. 

      Object

    • D. 

      Abrogate

  • 2. 
    Directions: In this question choose the option which can be substituted for the given words. To form a plot of scheme, especially on to do something wrong or wicked or designed to cause harm
    • A. 

      Machinate

    • B. 

      Conspire

    • C. 

      Fatal

    • D. 

      Machete

  • 3. 
    Directions: In this question choose the option which can be substituted for the given words. Very high-spirited, full of cheerfulness or enthusiasm
    • A. 

      Eccentric

    • B. 

      Eburmean

    • C. 

      Sporting

    • D. 

      Ebullient

  • 4. 
    Directions: In this question choose the option which can be substituted for the given words. A way of doing something, especially on ordered set of procedures or an orderly system
    • A. 

      Presentation

    • B. 

      Process

    • C. 

      Method

    • D. 

      Agendas

  • 5. 
    A sentence has been broken into four parts with an error in one of the parts. Identify the part that has an error.
    • A. 

      A temple was erected to him

    • B. 

      At the foot of the Capitoline Hill

    • C. 

      At which were deposited the

    • D. 

      Public treasury & the laws of the State

  • 6. 
    A sentence has been broken into four parts with an error in one of the parts. Identify the part that has an error.
    • A. 

      I soon lost sight & recollection of ghastly fears

    • B. 

      In the beauty of the scene as we drove along

    • C. 

      Although had I known the language, or rather languages which my fellow passengers were speaking

    • D. 

      I might not have been able to throw them off so easily

  • 7. 
    A sentence has been broken into four parts with an error in one of the parts. Identify the part that has an error.
    • A. 

      He has refused to accept the summons and should, therefore, be prosecuted under the provisions of Section 172 of IPC

    • B. 

      The police may proceed to register a case against the absconder and proceed under the provisions of IPC

    • C. 

      He may be prosecuted under the provisions of Section 172 of IPC for not responding to summons by the police

    • D. 

      He will be prosecuted under the provisions of Section 172 ('Absconding to avoid service of summons or other proceeding') of IPC for not responding to police summons

  • 8. 
    Identify the best way of writing the sentence in the context of correct usage of standard written English.
    • A. 

      We can divide the problem into parts in the present case firstly by considering events which are localised on the x-axis

    • B. 

      In the present case we can divide the problem into parts by considering events first which are localised as per x -axis

    • C. 

      By considering firs t the events which are localised on the x-axis, in the present case we can divide the problem into parts

    • D. 

      In the present case we can divide the problem into parts by first considering events which are localised on the x-axis

  • 9. 
    Identify the best way of writing the sentence in the context of correct usage of standard written English.
    • A. 

      If the constants 'a' and 'b' were known, thus we should have the solution of our problem

    • B. 

      We should thus have a solution to our problem, if the constants 'a' and 'b' are known

    • C. 

      We should, if the constants 'a' and 'b' were known, thus have the solution of our problem

    • D. 

      We should thus have the solution to our problem, if the constants 'a' and 'b' were known

  • 10. 
    Identify the best way of writing the sentence in the context of correct usage of standard written English.
    • A. 

      Excellence will come when the performer takes pride in doing his best

    • B. 

      Excellence comes as the performer will take pride in doing his best

    • C. 

      The excellence will come when the performer will take pride in doing his best

    • D. 

      Excellence comes when the performer takes pride in doing his best

  • 11. 
    Directions: Rearrange the letters of the jumbled word to identify the correct word, and select the option from below which is opposite in meaning to that word. SISPNHAPE
    • A. 

      Surrender

    • B. 

      Quickness

    • C. 

      Richness

    • D. 

      Sorrow

  • 12. 
    Directions: Rearrange the letters of the jumbled word to identify the correct word, and select the option from below which is opposite in meaning to that word. BRENYA
    • A. 

      Delight

    • B. 

      Discover

    • C. 

      Distant

    • D. 

      Direct

  • 13. 
    Directions: Rearrange the letters of the jumbled word to identify the correct word, and select the option from below which is opposite in meaning to that word. OSYIN
    • A. 

      Happy

    • B. 

      Quiet

    • C. 

      Laugh

    • D. 

      Sleep

  • 14. 
    Directions: Study the passages below and answer the questions that follow each passage. Passage I Universal Health Coverage CUHC) has now been widely adopted by Canada and many other developing countries both as a developmental imperative and the moral obligation of a civilised society. India embraced this vision at its independence. However, insufficient funding of public facilities, combined with faulty planning and inefficient management over the years, has resulted in a dysfunctional health system that has been yielding poor health outcomes. Private health services have grown by default, without checks on cost and quality, escalating private out-of- pocket health expenditures and exacerbating health inequity. Out-of- pocket expenditure still remains at 71 percent of all spending, without coverage for outpatient care, medicines and basic diagnostic tests. The High Level Expert Group (HLEG) established by the Planning Commission has submitted a comprehensive framework for providing UHC in India. A health entitlement card should assure every citizen access to a national health package of essential primary, secondary and tertiary care, both inpatient and outpatient. The HLEG is very clear that services included under UHC must be tax funded and cashless at delivery. Contributory social insurance is not appropriate for countries like India where a large segment of the workforce -close to 93 percent-is in the unorganised sector and vast numbers are below or near the poverty line. Increasing the public spending on health is the first immediate requirement. However, even the doubling of public financing will not be adequate to support all the components of a fully evolved UHC Priorities need to be defined. Clearly, there is no alternative to progressively strengthening public facilities, and thereby reducing people's dependence on private providers. However, the public system may need to "contract-in" the services of willing private providers, to fill gaps in its capacity to deliver all the services assured under UHC Such "contracted-in" private providers will have to deliver cashless services and would be compensated on the basis of pre-determined cost per package of health services rather than "fee-for-service" for each visit or procedure. In such an arrangement, the private sector acts as an extension of the public sector where needed, and will not compete for the same set of services for the same people. It is time to recognise that everyone, not just the poor, needs to be protected against rising health costs that can impoverish any family. Apart from improving people's health, adopting UHC is likely to generate millions of new jobs, enhance productivity, and promote equity. It can be inferred from the passage that
    • A. 

      Better health conditions prevailing in society lead to better impetus for development

    • B. 

      Civilised societies usually enjoy better health conditions than uncivilised ones

    • C. 

      Morality and development in society are two sides of the same coin

    • D. 

      All these

  • 15. 
    Directions: Study the passages below and answer the questions that follow each passage. Passage I Universal Health Coverage CUHC) has now been widely adopted by Canada and many other developing countries both as a developmental imperative and the moral obligation of a civilised society. India embraced this vision at its independence. However, insufficient funding of public facilities, combined with faulty planning and inefficient management over the years, has resulted in a dysfunctional health system that has been yielding poor health outcomes. Private health services have grown by default, without checks on cost and quality, escalating private out-of- pocket health expenditures and exacerbating health inequity. Out-of- pocket expenditure still remains at 71 percent of all spending, without coverage for outpatient care, medicines and basic diagnostic tests. The High Level Expert Group (HLEG) established by the Planning Commission has submitted a comprehensive framework for providing UHC in India. A health entitlement card should assure every citizen access to a national health package of essential primary, secondary and tertiary care, both inpatient and outpatient. The HLEG is very clear that services included under UHC must be tax funded and cashless at delivery. Contributory social insurance is not appropriate for countries like India where a large segment of the workforce -close to 93 percent-is in the unorganised sector and vast numbers are below or near the poverty line. Increasing the public spending on health is the first immediate requirement. However, even the doubling of public financing will not be adequate to support all the components of a fully evolved UHC Priorities need to be defined. Clearly, there is no alternative to progressively strengthening public facilities, and thereby reducing people's dependence on private providers. However, the public system may need to "contract-in" the services of willing private providers, to fill gaps in its capacity to deliver all the services assured under UHC Such "contracted-in" private providers will have to deliver cashless services and would be compensated on the basis of pre-determined cost per package of health services rather than "fee-for-service" for each visit or procedure. In such an arrangement, the private sector acts as an extension of the public sector where needed, and will not compete for the same set of services for the same people. It is time to recognise that everyone, not just the poor, needs to be protected against rising health costs that can impoverish any family. Apart from improving people's health, adopting UHC is likely to generate millions of new jobs, enhance productivity, and promote equity. It is implied in the passage that
    • A. 

      About 30% of population in India is covered by health insurance

    • B. 

      The private sector health care industry in India has grown essentially because the public healthcare systems are inefficient and/or inadequate

    • C. 

      India adopted 'Universal Health Coverage' as early as in the year 1947

    • D. 

      All these

  • 16. 
    Directions: Study the passages below and answer the questions that follow each passage. Passage I Universal Health Coverage CUHC) has now been widely adopted by Canada and many other developing countries both as a developmental imperative and the moral obligation of a civilised society. India embraced this vision at its independence. However, insufficient funding of public facilities, combined with faulty planning and inefficient management over the years, has resulted in a dysfunctional health system that has been yielding poor health outcomes. Private health services have grown by default, without checks on cost and quality, escalating private out-of- pocket health expenditures and exacerbating health inequity. Out-of- pocket expenditure still remains at 71 percent of all spending, without coverage for outpatient care, medicines and basic diagnostic tests. The High Level Expert Group (HLEG) established by the Planning Commission has submitted a comprehensive framework for providing UHC in India. A health entitlement card should assure every citizen access to a national health package of essential primary, secondary and tertiary care, both inpatient and outpatient. The HLEG is very clear that services included under UHC must be tax funded and cashless at delivery. Contributory social insurance is not appropriate for countries like India where a large segment of the workforce -close to 93 percent-is in the unorganised sector and vast numbers are below or near the poverty line. Increasing the public spending on health is the first immediate requirement. However, even the doubling of public financing will not be adequate to support all the components of a fully evolved UHC Priorities need to be defined. Clearly, there is no alternative to progressively strengthening public facilities, and thereby reducing people's dependence on private providers. However, the public system may need to "contract-in" the services of willing private providers, to fill gaps in its capacity to deliver all the services assured under UHC Such "contracted-in" private providers will have to deliver cashless services and would be compensated on the basis of pre-determined cost per package of health services rather than "fee-for-service" for each visit or procedure. In such an arrangement, the private sector acts as an extension of the public sector where needed, and will not compete for the same set of services for the same people. It is time to recognise that everyone, not just the poor, needs to be protected against rising health costs that can impoverish any family. Apart from improving people's health, adopting UHC is likely to generate millions of new jobs, enhance productivity, and promote equity. Which of the following statements is true in the context of the passage?
    • A. 

      The private health care centres certainly provide better facilities than the government-run centres

    • B. 

      The government of India proposes to issue health entitlement cards to all citizens for free health care

    • C. 

      The UHC system is fully evolved in India but the government has to pump in more funds to keep it running smoothly

    • D. 

      Implementing the UHC will create employment opportunities

  • 17. 
    Directions: Study the passages below and answer the questions that follow each passage. Passage I Universal Health Coverage CUHC) has now been widely adopted by Canada and many other developing countries both as a developmental imperative and the moral obligation of a civilised society. India embraced this vision at its independence. However, insufficient funding of public facilities, combined with faulty planning and inefficient management over the years, has resulted in a dysfunctional health system that has been yielding poor health outcomes. Private health services have grown by default, without checks on cost and quality, escalating private out-of- pocket health expenditures and exacerbating health inequity. Out-of- pocket expenditure still remains at 71 percent of all spending, without coverage for outpatient care, medicines and basic diagnostic tests. The High Level Expert Group (HLEG) established by the Planning Commission has submitted a comprehensive framework for providing UHC in India. A health entitlement card should assure every citizen access to a national health package of essential primary, secondary and tertiary care, both inpatient and outpatient. The HLEG is very clear that services included under UHC must be tax funded and cashless at delivery. Contributory social insurance is not appropriate for countries like India where a large segment of the workforce -close to 93 percent-is in the unorganised sector and vast numbers are below or near the poverty line. Increasing the public spending on health is the first immediate requirement. However, even the doubling of public financing will not be adequate to support all the components of a fully evolved UHC Priorities need to be defined. Clearly, there is no alternative to progressively strengthening public facilities, and thereby reducing people's dependence on private providers. However, the public system may need to "contract-in" the services of willing private providers, to fill gaps in its capacity to deliver all the services assured under UHC Such "contracted-in" private providers will have to deliver cashless services and would be compensated on the basis of pre-determined cost per package of health services rather than "fee-for-service" for each visit or procedure. In such an arrangement, the private sector acts as an extension of the public sector where needed, and will not compete for the same set of services for the same people. It is time to recognise that everyone, not just the poor, needs to be protected against rising health costs that can impoverish any family. Apart from improving people's health, adopting UHC is likely to generate millions of new jobs, enhance productivity, and promote equity. Which of the following statements is not necessarily true in the context of the passage?
    • A. 

      Contributory social insurance works best where a large segment of the country's workforce is above the poverty line

    • B. 

      The author of the passage feels that the government should outsource some of the health care services under the UHC to private players

    • C. 

      Cost of health care is rising rapidly and could severely dent a family's finances

    • D. 

      The primary objective behind issuing of UHC health entitlement cards is to avoid having to pay in cash when citizens avail health care services

  • 18. 
    Directions: Study the passages below and answer the questions that follow each passage. Passage II In order to capitalise on the groundwork done for creation of a successful solar market through the launch of the Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission, a recent report has suggested that India now needs to adopt greater transparency, benchmarking and monitoring, strategic approaches to finance, and technology- neutral policies for manufacturing to take the renewable energy mission forward. According to an independent report published by the Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW) and the Natural Resources Defence Council (NRDC), it has been found that India's solar industry is at a crucial stage of its growth and needs strategic nurturing. The report is of the view that a productive solar manufacturing base is an important part of India's aspirations to become a major global solar player. Investing in solar manufacturing now could provide long- term strategic value for India. But to be a dominant player in the global arena, India needs to make prompt, smart and concerted investments in manufacturing. "The National Solar Mission deserves much credit for laying the groundwork for a successful solar market, but a lot of market uncertainty still permeates the solar ecosystem and affects development of manufacturing capacity," says the Director, India Initiative at NRDC It has pointed out that a range of systemic issues hinder domestic manufacturing in India. "Indian manufacturing is of a smaller scale and more fragmented, leading to higher costs," says the CEO, CEEW. The report finds that the Indian solar manufacturing sector requires systemic improvements in infrastructure, domestic low-cost financing, and raw materials. The director of NRDC said policy makers should also not lose sight of value added industries and job creating potential further downstream. Outlining the priorities, the report states that Government must bring together different financial institutions to strengthen the solar financing ecosystem, which would operate at the strategic level, project level and offer ancillary support (R&D, skill development). Which of the following statements is/are implied in the passage in respect of the solar energy capability building in India? 1. A lot of work has already been done in this direction. 2. Transparency has been totally lacking with regard to the Indian government's research work done in this field. 3. India could soon be a global player in the area of solar energy.
    • A. 

      A only

    • B. 

      A & B

    • C. 

      A & C

    • D. 

      A, B & C

  • 19. 
    Directions: Study the passages below and answer the questions that follow each passage. Passage II In order to capitalise on the groundwork done for creation of a successful solar market through the launch of the Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission, a recent report has suggested that India now needs to adopt greater transparency, benchmarking and monitoring, strategic approaches to finance, and technology- neutral policies for manufacturing to take the renewable energy mission forward. According to an independent report published by the Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW) and the Natural Resources Defence Council (NRDC), it has been found that India's solar industry is at a crucial stage of its growth and needs strategic nurturing. The report is of the view that a productive solar manufacturing base is an important part of India's aspirations to become a major global solar player. Investing in solar manufacturing now could provide long- term strategic value for India. But to be a dominant player in the global arena, India needs to make prompt, smart and concerted investments in manufacturing. "The National Solar Mission deserves much credit for laying the groundwork for a successful solar market, but a lot of market uncertainty still permeates the solar ecosystem and affects development of manufacturing capacity," says the Director, India Initiative at NRDC It has pointed out that a range of systemic issues hinder domestic manufacturing in India. "Indian manufacturing is of a smaller scale and more fragmented, leading to higher costs," says the CEO, CEEW. The report finds that the Indian solar manufacturing sector requires systemic improvements in infrastructure, domestic low-cost financing, and raw materials. The director of NRDC said policy makers should also not lose sight of value added industries and job creating potential further downstream. Outlining the priorities, the report states that Government must bring together different financial institutions to strengthen the solar financing ecosystem, which would operate at the strategic level, project level and offer ancillary support (R&D, skill development). Which of the following statements is not implied in the passage?
    • A. 

      A sound financial strategy is essential for developing a good solar energy market

    • B. 

      Developing a sound solar energy industry would lead to development of other (related) industries as a spin-off benefit

    • C. 

      The uncertainties in the solar system are affecting the growth of the solar energy industry

    • D. 

      Solar energy could playa vital role in India's economic development

  • 20. 
    Directions: Study the passages below and answer the questions that follow each passage. Passage II In order to capitalise on the groundwork done for creation of a successful solar market through the launch of the Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission, a recent report has suggested that India now needs to adopt greater transparency, benchmarking and monitoring, strategic approaches to finance, and technology- neutral policies for manufacturing to take the renewable energy mission forward. According to an independent report published by the Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW) and the Natural Resources Defence Council (NRDC), it has been found that India's solar industry is at a crucial stage of its growth and needs strategic nurturing. The report is of the view that a productive solar manufacturing base is an important part of India's aspirations to become a major global solar player. Investing in solar manufacturing now could provide long- term strategic value for India. But to be a dominant player in the global arena, India needs to make prompt, smart and concerted investments in manufacturing. "The National Solar Mission deserves much credit for laying the groundwork for a successful solar market, but a lot of market uncertainty still permeates the solar ecosystem and affects development of manufacturing capacity," says the Director, India Initiative at NRDC It has pointed out that a range of systemic issues hinder domestic manufacturing in India. "Indian manufacturing is of a smaller scale and more fragmented, leading to higher costs," says the CEO, CEEW. The report finds that the Indian solar manufacturing sector requires systemic improvements in infrastructure, domestic low-cost financing, and raw materials. The director of NRDC said policy makers should also not lose sight of value added industries and job creating potential further downstream. Outlining the priorities, the report states that Government must bring together different financial institutions to strengthen the solar financing ecosystem, which would operate at the strategic level, project level and offer ancillary support (R&D, skill development). According to the passage, the solar industry in India
    • A. 

      Is very much dependent on the National Solar Mission for its future growth

    • B. 

      Is still in its launch phase

    • C. 

      Needs governmental support to ensure its progress in the growth path

    • D. 

      All these

  • 21. 
    Directions: Study the passages below and answer the questions that follow each passage. Passage II In order to capitalise on the groundwork done for creation of a successful solar market through the launch of the Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission, a recent report has suggested that India now needs to adopt greater transparency, benchmarking and monitoring, strategic approaches to finance, and technology- neutral policies for manufacturing to take the renewable energy mission forward. According to an independent report published by the Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW) and the Natural Resources Defence Council (NRDC), it has been found that India's solar industry is at a crucial stage of its growth and needs strategic nurturing. The report is of the view that a productive solar manufacturing base is an important part of India's aspirations to become a major global solar player. Investing in solar manufacturing now could provide long- term strategic value for India. But to be a dominant player in the global arena, India needs to make prompt, smart and concerted investments in manufacturing. "The National Solar Mission deserves much credit for laying the groundwork for a successful solar market, but a lot of market uncertainty still permeates the solar ecosystem and affects development of manufacturing capacity," says the Director, India Initiative at NRDC It has pointed out that a range of systemic issues hinder domestic manufacturing in India. "Indian manufacturing is of a smaller scale and more fragmented, leading to higher costs," says the CEO, CEEW. The report finds that the Indian solar manufacturing sector requires systemic improvements in infrastructure, domestic low-cost financing, and raw materials. The director of NRDC said policy makers should also not lose sight of value added industries and job creating potential further downstream. Outlining the priorities, the report states that Government must bring together different financial institutions to strengthen the solar financing ecosystem, which would operate at the strategic level, project level and offer ancillary support (R&D, skill development). As per the passage, which of the following factors is/are seen as disadvantageous to the Indian solar industry while competing in the global market? 1. Government's apathy towards this industry. 2. Robust manufacturing practices of the other global players. 3. Lack of adequate capital in the country for channelising into this industry.
    • A. 

      A only

    • B. 

      A & B

    • C. 

      A & C

    • D. 

      None of these

  • 22. 
    Directions: Study the passages below and answer the questions that follow each passage. Passage III Most Indians are not particularly worried about Indian Standard Times (IST), except for those who live in the Northeast where the sun rises around 4 a.m. in summer, and gets dark well before 4 p.m. in winter. Those of us who have to make overseas long distance calls and get into trouble with fractions are not even aware that we belong to a minority (three percent) of regions whose standard times are fractional hours off from GMT. India spans longitudes of 68° at the western end and 98° at the eastern boundary and, as there is a difference of one hour for every 15° of longitude, the two extremes differ by two hours. Thus, when the sun sets at 4 p.m. in Kohima, it sets at 6 p.m. in Porbunder. IST was fixed in 1906 midway at 82.5°, or  hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). Periodically, there are demands from the Northeast region for a separate time zone so that the clocks there may be advanced by an hour. There is a general misconception among those who worry about saving energy-such as the Planning Commission-that dividing the country into time zones will save "a lot of energy." The savings are almost always described by adjectives, for very few have estimated correctly the amount of savings that may accrue by altering IST or creating two time zones. There is also the practice in several countries, of "Daylight Saving Time" (DST), wherein the time in summer is advanced (or the clocks put forward) by one hour and retracted during winter. This enables people to enjoy sunlight longer in summer and avoid the inconveniences of late sunrises and early sunsets during winter. Our proposal for India is to introduce neither time zones nor DST, but to advance IST by half an hour to being six hours ahead of GMT, once and permanently. Such a suggestion has been made before, but until now no one has computed the energy savings that would accrue as a result, using a correct model and dependable data. Our fairly rigorous method has been vetted by national and international experts and is based on load demand data at five electrical zones of India, provided by the Power Grid Corporation of India. The Bureau of Energy Efficiency provided financial support for the study.. It can be inferred from the passage that 1. Time, by clocks across India, would be same at any given point of the day. 2. People in North-East India go to bed well before people in Western India do. 3. People in the North-Eastern part of India work longer hours in summer than they do in winter.
    • A. 

      A only

    • B. 

      A & B

    • C. 

      A & C

    • D. 

      A, B & C

  • 23. 
    Directions: Study the passages below and answer the questions that follow each passage. Passage III Most Indians are not particularly worried about Indian Standard Times (IST), except for those who live in the Northeast where the sun rises around 4 a.m. in summer, and gets dark well before 4 p.m. in winter. Those of us who have to make overseas long distance calls and get into trouble with fractions are not even aware that we belong to a minority (three percent) of regions whose standard times are fractional hours off from GMT. India spans longitudes of 68° at the western end and 98° at the eastern boundary and, as there is a difference of one hour for every 15° of longitude, the two extremes differ by two hours. Thus, when the sun sets at 4 p.m. in Kohima, it sets at 6 p.m. in Porbunder. IST was fixed in 1906 midway at 82.5°, or  hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). Periodically, there are demands from the Northeast region for a separate time zone so that the clocks there may be advanced by an hour. There is a general misconception among those who worry about saving energy-such as the Planning Commission-that dividing the country into time zones will save "a lot of energy." The savings are almost always described by adjectives, for very few have estimated correctly the amount of savings that may accrue by altering IST or creating two time zones. There is also the practice in several countries, of "Daylight Saving Time" (DST), wherein the time in summer is advanced (or the clocks put forward) by one hour and retracted during winter. This enables people to enjoy sunlight longer in summer and avoid the inconveniences of late sunrises and early sunsets during winter. Our proposal for India is to introduce neither time zones nor DST, but to advance IST by half an hour to being six hours ahead of GMT, once and permanently. Such a suggestion has been made before, but until now no one has computed the energy savings that would accrue as a result, using a correct model and dependable data. Our fairly rigorous method has been vetted by national and international experts and is based on load demand data at five electrical zones of India, provided by the Power Grid Corporation of India. The Bureau of Energy Efficiency provided financial support for the study. Which of the following statements is true as per the passage?
    • A. 

      India is amongst the three percent of nations in the world which follow standard time patterns

    • B. 

      India is among the minority of nations whose standard time is at variance with GMT

    • C. 

      Days in North-East India generally begin at 4 a.m. and end at about 4 p.m

    • D. 

      None of these

  • 24. 
    Directions: Study the passages below and answer the questions that follow each passage. Passage III Most Indians are not particularly worried about Indian Standard Times (IST), except for those who live in the Northeast where the sun rises around 4 a.m. in summer, and gets dark well before 4 p.m. in winter. Those of us who have to make overseas long distance calls and get into trouble with fractions are not even aware that we belong to a minority (three percent) of regions whose standard times are fractional hours off from GMT. India spans longitudes of 68° at the western end and 98° at the eastern boundary and, as there is a difference of one hour for every 15° of longitude, the two extremes differ by two hours. Thus, when the sun sets at 4 p.m. in Kohima, it sets at 6 p.m. in Porbunder. IST was fixed in 1906 midway at 82.5o, or  hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). Periodically, there are demands from the Northeast region for a separate time zone so that the clocks there may be advanced by an hour. There is a general misconception among those who worry about saving energy-such as the Planning Commission-that dividing the country into time zones will save "a lot of energy." The savings are almost always described by adjectives, for very few have estimated correctly the amount of savings that may accrue by altering IST or creating two time zones. There is also the practice in several countries, of "Daylight Saving Time" (DST), wherein the time in summer is advanced (or the clocks put forward) by one hour and retracted during winter. This enables people to enjoy sunlight longer in summer and avoid the inconveniences of late sunrises and early sunsets during winter. Our proposal for India is to introduce neither time zones nor DST, but to advance IST by half an hour to being six hours ahead of GMT, once and permanently. Such a suggestion has been made before, but until now no one has computed the energy savings that would accrue as a result, using a correct model and dependable data. Our fairly rigorous method has been vetted by national and international experts and is based on load demand data at five electrical zones of India, provided by the Power Grid Corporation of India. The Bureau of Energy Efficiency provided financial support for the study. What is the specific misconception of the Planning Commission in respect of energy saving, according to the passage?
    • A. 

      Dividing the country into multiple time zones would surely save energy for the nation

    • B. 

      The one and only way to save energy is to divide the country into time zones

    • C. 

      Substantial energy savings could be effected by dividing the country into two time zones

    • D. 

      None of these

  • 25. 
    Directions: Study the passages below and answer the questions that follow each passage. Passage III Most Indians are not particularly worried about Indian Standard Times (IST), except for those who live in the Northeast where the sun rises around 4 a.m. in summer, and gets dark well before 4 p.m. in winter. Those of us who have to make overseas long distance calls and get into trouble with fractions are not even aware that we belong to a minority (three percent) of regions whose standard times are fractional hours off from GMT. India spans longitudes of 68° at the western end and 98° at the eastern boundary and, as there is a difference of one hour for every 15° of longitude, the two extremes differ by two hours. Thus, when the sun sets at 4 p.m. in Kohima, it sets at 6 p.m. in Porbunder. IST was fixed in 1906 midway at 82.5o, or  hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). Periodically, there are demands from the Northeast region for a separate time zone so that the clocks there may be advanced by an hour. There is a general misconception among those who worry about saving energy-such as the Planning Commission-that dividing the country into time zones will save "a lot of energy." The savings are almost always described by adjectives, for very few have estimated correctly the amount of savings that may accrue by altering IST or creating two time zones. There is also the practice in several countries, of "Daylight Saving Time" (DST), wherein the time in summer is advanced (or the clocks put forward) by one hour and retracted during winter. This enables people to enjoy sunlight longer in summer and avoid the inconveniences of late sunrises and early sunsets during winter. Our proposal for India is to introduce neither time zones nor DST, but to advance IST by half an hour to being six hours ahead of GMT, once and permanently. Such a suggestion has been made before, but until now no one has computed the energy savings that would accrue as a result, using a correct model and dependable data. Our fairly rigorous method has been vetted by national and international experts and is based on load demand data at five electrical zones of India, provided by the Power Grid Corporation of India. The Bureau of Energy Efficiency provided financial support for the study. What is the primary concern of the author in writing this article?
    • A. 

      To align the clocks in the five different regions of India, in tune with the respective sunrise and sunset times

    • B. 

      To align IST with GMT

    • C. 

      To ensure that India advances its clock by half an hour only

    • D. 

      That India should implement an effective method of energy savings

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