Manipulating Research Materials Quiz

73 Questions | Total Attempts: 77

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Research Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Making up data or results and recording or reporting them.
    • A. 

      Fabrication

    • B. 

      Falsification

    • C. 

      Plagiarism

    • D. 

      Option4

  • 2. 
    Manipulating research materials, equipment, or processes, or changing or omitting data or results such that the research is no longer accurately represented in the research record. 
    • A. 

      Fabrication

    • B. 

      Plagiarism

    • C. 

      Falsification

    • D. 

      Option4

  • 3. 
    The appropriation of another person’s ideas, processes, results, or words without giving appropriate credit.
    • A. 

      Plagerisim

    • B. 

      Falsification

    • C. 

      Fabrication

    • D. 

      Option4

  • 4. 
    Making something public has the following social and ethical dimensions: Such as Social: status, prestige, profit, control. and  Ethical: veracity, transparency, equity.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 5. 
    Authors must meet ALL of the following:
    • A. 

       Substantial contributions to conception and design, or acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data.

    • B. 

       Drafting the article or revising it critically for important intellectual content.

    • C. 

       Final approval of the version to be published.

    • D. 

      Option4

  • 6. 
    Peer reviewers are expected to provide the following to the editor:
    • A. 

       The value and the originality of the work.

    • B. 

       Problems with the methodology or approach.

    • C. 

       Problems with how the research has been explained.

    • D. 

       Whether appropriate credit has been given to others

  • 7. 
    Reviewer comments should identify positive aspects/negative aspects (constructivity). Should not include personal attacks, and its inappropriate for a reviewer to contact an author directly
    • A. 

       Constructive critique

    • B. 

       Competence:

    • C. 

       Impartiality and integrity

    • D. 

      Option4

  • 8. 
    §  potential reviewers should honestly evaluate their own ability to be impartial. Objective and fair consideration of manuscript. Should be based on manuscript’s merits.
    • A. 

       Impartiality and integrity

    • B. 

       Competence:

    • C. 

       Confidentiality

    • D. 

      Option4

  • 9. 
    Should accept an assignment only if they have enough expertise to provide an authoritative statement.
    • A. 

       Confidentiality

    • B. 

       Constructive critique

    • C. 

       Competence

    • D. 

       Impartiality and integrity

  • 10. 
    Mentors should posess
    • A. 

       Experience with the research and challenges that the trainees face.

    • B. 

       The ability and willingness to communicate that experience.

    • C. 

       An interest in helping another person develop into a successful professional.

    • D. 

      Should be available, listen carefully, keep in touch, allow for differences, let trainees make decisions, teach by words and examples, and keep learning about effective mentoring.

    • E. 

       Locate prospective mentors

  • 11. 
    O   Trainees should:
    • A. 

       Identify their career plans

    • B. 

       Locate prospective mentors

    • C. 

       Distinguish between supervisors and mentees

    • D. 

       Be clear about needs and expectations

    • E. 

       Keep learning about effective mentoring.

  • 12. 
    Conflicts of interests are situations that increase the risk of bias
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 13. 
    O   Having a conflict of interest is not the same as simply having conflicting desires or individual biases.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 14. 
    O   Having a conflict of interest implies only the potential for bias/wrongdoing, not a certainty or likelihood.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 15. 
    A conflict of interest is considered research misconduct, since the federal definition of research misconduct is limited to fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 16. 
    O   Factors contributing to increase in research collaborations are
    • A. 

       Technological advances permit easy communication worldwide

    • B. 

       Scarce resources

    • C. 

       Private and federal funding sources encourage collaborative and multidisciplinary projects.

    • D. 

       Difference between academic and industrial research with respect to data sharing

  • 17. 
    §  Researchers who work within the same discipline and  §  Multi-disciplinary research (researchers working across several disciplines) are examples of collaborative research
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 18. 
    What are the potential problems of collaborative research
    • A. 

       Differences in style of investigators

    • B. 

       Differences in style of research across and within disciplines

    • C. 

       Difference between academic and industrial research with respect to data sharing

    • D. 

       Ethical considerations may affect research across institutions and nations

  • 19. 
    Research is the process whereby scientists attempt to understand the world and its inhabitants. Scientific research is governed by a strict set of rules that define the scientific method
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 20. 
    Factors that can increase the likelihood of a positive collaboration include
    • A. 

       Communication throughout a project

    • B. 

       Discussing in advance who will do what project and understanding that the research may evolve

    • C. 

       Discussing in advance authorship

    • D. 

       Discussing in advance data management

    • E. 

       Concluding or continuing the collaboration

    • F. 

       Clarifying data ownership issues beyond the collaboration

    • G. 

       Developing trust, collegiality, and a profound sense of fairness and accountability

  • 21. 
    Conducted to contribute new scientific knowledge with no intention of solving a social or clinical problem or any practical application
    • A. 

      Basic research

    • B. 

      Applied research

    • C. 

      Laboratory studies

    • D. 

      Option4

  • 22. 
    Conducted to solve a social problem, clinical problem, or other practical application.
    • A. 

      Basic research

    • B. 

      Applied research

    • C. 

      Laboratory Studies

    • D. 

      Option4

  • 23. 
    Laboratory Studies are 
    • A. 

       Conducted in more or less contrived settings outside the mainstream of daily life.

    • B. 

      Conducted to contribute new scientific knowledge with no intention of solving a social or clinical problem or any practical application.

    • C. 

       Maintains rigid control over variables

    • D. 

       Risks laboratory bias

  • 24. 
     Field Studies are 
    • A. 

       Conducted in every day settings such as homes, schools or clinics.

    • B. 

       Aims to observe behaviors as they occur in their natural environment.

    • C. 

       May sacrifice close control over variables for closer ties to reality

    • D. 

       Participants are randomly assigned to two or more conditions.

  • 25. 
    Two requirements are central to the definition of a true experiment.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

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