Absolute Phrase Or Participial Phrase? Practice #1

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Absolute Phrase Or Participial Phrase? Practice #1 - Quiz


Delve into the subtleties of English grammar with our 'Absolute Phrase vs. Participial Phrase Quiz.' This quiz will guide you through the intriguing world of absolute and participial phrases, helping you master their usage effectively.
Absolute phrases and participial phrases are essential elements in English grammar, each with its distinct function and structure. In this quiz, you'll explore these nuances through a series of engaging exercises and examples. Test your understanding of when to use each construction and discover how they enhance sentence structure and meaning.
Whether you're a grammar enthusiast seeking to sharpen your skills or a Read morestudent aiming for better writing, this quiz is your opportunity to gain a deeper comprehension of absolute and participial phrases. As you navigate through the quiz, you'll not only spot the differences between these two grammatical structures but also learn how to incorporate them effectively in your own writing.
Join us on this enlightening journey through the world of grammar with the 'Absolute Phrase vs. Participial Phrase Quiz.' Strengthen your language proficiency and gain confidence in crafting more dynamic and expressive sentences.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Her suspicions confirmed, the police officer made the arrest.

    • A.

      Absolute phrase

    • B.

      Participial phrase

    Correct Answer
    A. Absolute phrase
    Explanation
     This phrase is absolute because it has a noun, participle, and modifier.  Noun (suspicions) + Participle (confirmed) + Modifier (her)

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  • 2. 

    Backing out of the driveway, I hit the mailbox.

    • A.

      Absolute phrase

    • B.

      Participial phrase

    Correct Answer
    B. Participial phrase
    Explanation
    "Backing out of the driveway" is not an absolute phrase; it is a present participial phrase because it does not contain the first noun. Remember: an absolute phrase is a  noun + participle + modifiers/objects.

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  • 3. 

    They will take the daytime train, the landscape inviting.

    • A.

      Absolute phrase

    • B.

      Participial phrase

    Correct Answer
    A. Absolute phrase
    Explanation
    Noun (landscape) + Participle (inviting) + Modifiers (the)

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  • 4. 

    My doubts relieved, I gained confidence as the game progressed. 

    • A.

      Absolute phrase

    • B.

      Participial phrase

    Correct Answer
    A. Absolute phrase
    Explanation
    Noun (doubts) + Participle (relieved) + Modifier (my)

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  • 5. 

    Peering through a microscope, the scientist identified several germs.

    • A.

      Absolute phrase

    • B.

      Participial phrase

    Correct Answer
    B. Participial phrase
    Explanation
    "Peering through a microscope" is a present participial phrase because it does not start with a noun.

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  • 6. 

    His dogs panting with exertion, Hugh took a break from his run.

    • A.

      Absolute phrase

    • B.

      Participial phrase

    Correct Answer
    A. Absolute phrase
    Explanation
    Noun (dogs) + Participle (panting) + Modifier (his) + Modifier (with exertion)

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  • 7. 

    Its shutters hanging limply in the wind, the house looked abandoned.

    • A.

      Absolute phrase

    • B.

      Participial phrase

    Correct Answer
    A. Absolute phrase
    Explanation
    Noun (shutters) + Participle (hanging) + Modifier (its) + Modifier (limply) + Modifier (in the wind)

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  • 8. 

    The car rusted and worthless, I left it at the junkyard.

    • A.

      Absolute phrase

    • B.

      Participial phrase

    Correct Answer
    A. Absolute phrase
    Explanation
    Noun (car) + Participle (rusted) + Modifier (the) + Modifier (and) + Modifier (worthless)

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  • 9. 

    Wearing a yellow raincoat, Lydia looked like a character in a novel.

    • A.

      Absolute phrase

    • B.

      Participial phrase

    Correct Answer
    B. Participial phrase
    Explanation
    "Wearing a yellow raincoat" is a participial phrase because it does not start with a noun.

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  • 10. 

    Everything planned in advance, the party went like clockwork.

    • A.

      Absolute phrase

    • B.

      Participial phrase

    Correct Answer
    A. Absolute phrase
    Explanation
    Noun (everything) + Participle (planned) + Modifier (in advance)

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