Quiz: Can You Pass This Plagiarism Test?

5 Questions | Total Attempts: 1221

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Quiz: Can You Pass This Plagiarism Test? - Quiz

Can You Pass This Plagiarism Test? When you are in the publishing business, originality is everything, and copying the works of others can lead to legal action or lead your future works to be frowned upon. Do you think you have the skills needed to identify if a work is plagiarized? Use the quiz below to see just how skilled you are.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Original Source Material Student Version Given that skill learning is often enhanced during sleep, one would expect to see concomitant increases in synaptic strength. However, in many studies, sleep actually decreases synaptic strength. This led to the idea that sleep is a time for reducing the number of synaptic connections to enhance the information storage capacity of the brain. Reference Euston, D. R. & Steenland, H. W. (2014).  Memories—getting wired during sleep. Science, 344(6188), 1087-1088. This supports the idea that sleep is a time for reducing the number of synaptic connections to enhance the information storage capacity of the brain. Reference Euston, D. R. & Steenland, H. W. (2014).  Memories—getting wired during sleep. Science, 344(6188), 1087-1088.
    • A. 

      Plagiarized

    • B. 

      Not plagiarized

    • C. 

      Option 3

    • D. 

      Option 4

  • 2. 
    Original Source Material: Research in inquiry learning currently focuses on finding scaffolds or cognitive tools that help to alleviate these problems and produce effective and efficient learning situations. Computer environments can integrate these cognitive tools with the simulation. Reference de Jong, T. (2006). Technological Advances in Inquiry Learning. Science, 312(5773), 532-533. Student Version: Teachers are encouraged to use cognitive tools. There are several cognitive tools available to teachers.  "Computer environments can integrate these cognitive tools with the simulation" (de Jong, 2006, p. 532) Reference de Jong, T. (2006). Technological Advances in Inquiry Learning. Science, 312(5773), 532-533.
    • A. 

      Plagiarism

    • B. 

      Not Plagiarism

    • C. 

      Option 3

    • D. 

      Option 4

  • 3. 
    Original Source Material: Instructional design theory requires at least two components: methods for facilitating human learning and development (which are also called methods of instruction), and indications as to when and when not to use these methods (which I call situations). Reference Reigeluth, C. M. (1999). What is instructional design theory and how is it changing? In C. M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional-design theories and models volume II: A new paradigm of instructional theory. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Student Version: Two components must be present in an instructional design theory. The first component (methods) describes how human learning will be supported, and the second component (situation) describes when certain methods ought to be used.
    • A. 

      Plagiarism

    • B. 

      Not plagiarism

    • C. 

      Option 3

    • D. 

      Option 4

  • 4. 
    Original Source Material:Instructional designers typically employ models to guide their day-to-day work. Due to the increased practice of the systematic design of instruction in a growing number of settings, available models become more and more proliferated, focusing on particular types and contexts of learning, particular groups of learners or designers, or particular instructional units (either whole curricula or individual modules or lessons.)The main goal of any instructional design process is to construct a learning environment in order to provide learners with the conditions that support desired learning processes.ReferenceVan Merriënboer, J. J. (1997). Training complex cognitive skills: A four-component instructional design model for technical training. Educational Technology.Student Version:The main goal of any instructional design process is to construct a learning environment in order to provide learners with the conditions that support desired learning processes. Process models proliferate because more and more designers generate models that focus on specific contexts, learners, or even units of instruction.ReferenceVan Merriënboer, J. J. (1997). Training complex cognitive skills: A four-component instructional design model for technical training. Educational Technology.
    • A. 

      Plagiarism

    • B. 

      Not Plagiarism

    • C. 

      Option 3

    • D. 

      Option 4

  • 5. 
    Original Source Material 1:...literacies crucially entails sense making within a rich, multimodal semiotic system, situated in a community of practice that renders that system meaningful.Reference 1Steinkuehler C. (2007) Massively multiplayer online gaming as a constellation of literacy practices. eLearning 4(3):297–318.Original Source Material 2:…noted a favorable reaction to the game of those students preferring more social styles of learning [and] ... active involvement was the only affective factor significantly linked to learning.Reference 2Corbeil, P., & Laveault, D. (2011).  Validity of a Simulation Game as a Method for History Teaching.  Simulation & Gaming, 42(4), 462-475Student Version:Steinkuehler (2007) points out that “...literacies crucially entails sense making within a rich, multimodal semiotic system, situated in a community of practice that renders that system meaningful” (p.300). In a multimodal semiotic system, "...active involvement was the only affective factor significantly linked to learning"(Corbeil & Laveault, 2011, p. 474).ReferencesSteinkuehler C. (2007) Massively multiplayer online gaming as a constellation of literacy practices. eLearning 4(3), 297–318.Corbeil, P., & Laveault, D. (2011).  Validity of a Simulation Game as a Method for History Teaching.  Simulation & Gaming, 42(4), 462-475
    • A. 

      Plagiarism

    • B. 

      Not Plagiarism

    • C. 

      Option 3

    • D. 

      Option 4

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