Motor Speech Quiz 4

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| By Byte6
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Quizzes Created: 8 | Total Attempts: 2,260
Questions: 11 | Attempts: 176

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Motor Speech Quizzes & Trivia

This quiz covers some anatomy and basic subject matter how the nervous system and speech motor system interact. This quiz is based off a number of class notes and the books Duffy, J. R. (2005). Motor Speech Disorders: Substrates, Differential Diagnosis and Management. St Louis: Mosby. [ISBN: 978-0-323-02452-5] Freed, D. (2000). Motor Speech Disorders Diagnosis and Treatment. Singular Publications. [ISBN: 1-565-93951-4]


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Skeletal muscles are also known as

    • A.

      Somatic muscles

    • B.

      Smooth muscles

    Correct Answer
    A. Somatic muscles
    Explanation
    Skeletal muscles are also known as somatic muscles because they are under voluntary control and are responsible for the movement of the body. These muscles are attached to the skeleton and are responsible for actions such as walking, running, and lifting objects. Smooth muscles, on the other hand, are found in organs and blood vessels and are not under voluntary control. They control involuntary movements such as the contraction of the digestive system and blood vessels. Therefore, the correct answer is somatic muscles.

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  • 2. 

    Name the major structures involved in the cerebellar system

    • A.

      Basal ganglia, substantia nigra, subthalamus, cerebral cortex

    • B.

      Corticobulbar tracts corticospinal tracts

    • C.

      Cerebellar peduncles, reticular formation, red nucleus, pontine nuclei, inferior olive, thalamus, cerebral cortex

    Correct Answer
    C. Cerebellar peduncles, reticular formation, red nucleus, pontine nuclei, inferior olive, thalamus, cerebral cortex
    Explanation
    The major structures involved in the cerebellar system are the cerebellar peduncles, reticular formation, red nucleus, pontine nuclei, inferior olive, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. These structures work together to coordinate and regulate motor movements, balance, and posture. The cerebellar peduncles serve as the main communication pathways between the cerebellum and other parts of the brain. The reticular formation is involved in regulating arousal and attention. The red nucleus and pontine nuclei are important for motor control. The inferior olive is responsible for timing and coordination of movements. The thalamus relays sensory information to the cerebral cortex, which then processes and integrates it for motor planning and execution.

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  • 3. 

    What is the arculate fasiculus?

    • A.

      Band of fibers between occipital, temporal and cerebellum

    • B.

      Band of fibers between mid temporal lobe and lower region of frontal lobe by the way of the parietal lobe

    • C.

      Band of fibers connecting the hemispheres

    Correct Answer
    B. Band of fibers between mid temporal lobe and lower region of frontal lobe by the way of the parietal lobe
    Explanation
    The arculate fasiculus is a band of fibers that connects the mid temporal lobe and the lower region of the frontal lobe by passing through the parietal lobe. It is responsible for connecting different regions of the brain involved in language processing and production.

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  • 4. 

    What's the importance of the angular gyrus that is located at the junction of the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes?

    • A.

      Important for processes involved in reading and writing

    • B.

      Important for formulating linguistic messages with appropriate syntax and semantics

    • C.

      Important for planning and performing and expressive language actions

    Correct Answer
    A. Important for processes involved in reading and writing
    Explanation
    The angular gyrus, located at the junction of the temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes, is important for processes involved in reading and writing. It plays a crucial role in visual word recognition and comprehension, as well as in the integration of visual, auditory, and somatosensory information related to language processing. Damage to the angular gyrus can result in difficulties with reading, writing, and language comprehension. Therefore, the angular gyrus is vital for the cognitive processes necessary for proficient reading and writing skills.

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  • 5. 

    The anterior language zone located in the left frontal lobe is important in

    • A.

      Formulating linguistic messages with appropriate syntax and semantics

    • B.

      Important for processes involved in reading and writing

    • C.

      Important for planning and performing expressive language actions

    Correct Answer
    C. Important for planning and performing expressive language actions
    Explanation
    The anterior language zone located in the left frontal lobe is responsible for planning and executing expressive language actions. This means that it plays a crucial role in formulating and producing spoken or written language. It is involved in coordinating the motor movements necessary for speech production, as well as organizing and sequencing the linguistic components of a message. This area is not specifically involved in reading and writing, nor is it responsible for the syntax and semantics of language. Its main function is focused on the planning and execution of expressive language actions.

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  • 6. 

    The posterior language zone located in the left temporal and parietal lobes are

    • A.

      Important for processes in reading and writing

    • B.

      Formulating linguistic messages with appropriate syntax and semantics

    • C.

      Important for planning and performing expressive languagge actions

    Correct Answer
    B. Formulating linguistic messages with appropriate syntax and semantics
    Explanation
    The posterior language zone, located in the left temporal and parietal lobes, is responsible for formulating linguistic messages with appropriate syntax and semantics. This means that it helps in organizing and structuring language in a way that makes sense grammatically and meaningfully. It plays a crucial role in our ability to communicate effectively through both spoken and written language.

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  • 7. 

    What is known as the lentiform nucleus?

    • A.

      Caudate nucleus and striatum

    • B.

      Putamen and global pallidus

    Correct Answer
    B. Putamen and global pallidus
    Explanation
    The lentiform nucleus is a structure in the brain that consists of two parts: the putamen and the globus pallidus. It is located deep within the brain and is involved in motor control and movement. The putamen is responsible for coordinating and regulating movement, while the globus pallidus helps to inhibit unwanted movements. Together, these two structures play a crucial role in motor function and are collectively referred to as the lentiform nucleus.

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  • 8. 

    What are the two most important neurotransmitters for basal ganglia activity?

    • A.

      Dopamine and ACH

    • B.

      ACH and gaba

    • C.

      ACH and glutamate

    Correct Answer
    B. ACH and gaba
    Explanation
    The basal ganglia is a group of structures in the brain involved in motor control. Acetylcholine (ACH) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are the two most important neurotransmitters for basal ganglia activity. ACH is responsible for excitatory signals that initiate movement, while GABA is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that helps regulate and fine-tune movement. These two neurotransmitters work together to ensure smooth and coordinated motor function.

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  • 9. 

    How are corticobulbar and corticospinal tracts arranged in the CNS?

    • A.

      In a top to bottom fashion

    • B.

      Fan like - corona radiata

    • C.

      In a tight band internal capsule

    Correct Answer
    B. Fan like - corona radiata
    Explanation
    The corticobulbar and corticospinal tracts are arranged in a fan-like pattern known as the corona radiata. This arrangement refers to the spreading out of nerve fibers as they radiate from the cerebral cortex towards the brainstem and spinal cord. The corona radiata is responsible for transmitting motor signals from the brain to the cranial nerves (corticobulbar tract) and the spinal nerves (corticospinal tract). This arrangement allows for efficient and coordinated control of voluntary movements throughout the body.

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  • 10. 

    What are the sole output neurons of the cerebellar cortex?

    • A.

      Mossy fibers

    • B.

      Purkinje cells

    • C.

      Astrocytes

    • D.

      Schwann cells

    Correct Answer
    B. Purkinje cells
    Explanation
    Purkinje cells are the sole output neurons of the cerebellar cortex. They are large, specialized cells that play a crucial role in motor coordination and learning. These cells receive inputs from various sources within the cerebellar cortex and send their output to other parts of the brain and spinal cord. Purkinje cells are characterized by their extensive dendritic trees, which receive inputs from parallel fibers and climbing fibers, and their axons, which transmit signals to other parts of the brain. Their unique structure and connectivity make Purkinje cells essential for the proper functioning of the cerebellum.

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  • 11. 

    What cells form myelin in the PNS?

    • A.

      Mossy fibers

    • B.

      Purkinje cells

    • C.

      Astrocytes

    • D.

      Schwann cells

    Correct Answer
    D. Schwann cells
    Explanation
    Schwann cells are responsible for forming myelin in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Myelin is a fatty substance that wraps around nerve fibers, providing insulation and increasing the speed of electrical impulses. While astrocytes are a type of glial cell found in the central nervous system (CNS), they do not form myelin. Mossy fibers and Purkinje cells are specific types of neurons found in the cerebellum, and they do not have a role in myelin formation. Therefore, Schwann cells are the correct answer for this question.

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  • Current Version
  • Mar 17, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Jun 03, 2008
    Quiz Created by
    Byte6
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