Dental Histology Hardest Exam: Quiz!

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| By Siroishka
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Dental Histology Hardest Exam: Quiz! - Quiz

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What is "A" in the Photo

    Explanation
    elongated, cuboidal shape with flat nucleus

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  • 2. 

    What is "B" in the photo

    Explanation
    surrounds serous cells, contracts cells and pushes saliva into oral cavity

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    Salivary glands consist of 2 elements, what are they? (separate answer with comma)

    Explanation
    The salivary glands are composed of two main elements: glandular secretory tissue, also known as parenchyma, and supporting connective tissue, also known as stroma. The glandular secretory tissue is responsible for producing and secreting saliva, while the supporting connective tissue provides structural support and helps maintain the shape and integrity of the glands. These two elements work together to ensure the proper functioning of the salivary glands.

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  • 4. 

    What kind of cells are the arrows pointing at?

    Explanation
    Lie between basal lamina and basal membranes of acini cells and duct cells.
    • Dendritic cells with stellate shaped body,
    • Also present in intercalated ducts.
    • Have parasympatheic and sympatheitc
    stimulation.
    • Functions include: supporting parenchyma,
    increasing initial flow of saliva, contributing to
    secretory pressure and reducing luminal flow

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  • 5. 

    What kind of cell is this? What is "C" representing (separate answer with comma)

    Explanation
    Saliva is produced in and secreted from salivary glands. The basic secretory units of salivary glands are clusters of cells called an acini. These cells secrete a fluid that contains water, electrolytes, mucus and enzymes, all of which flow out of the acinus into collecting ducts

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  • 6. 

    What is this picture showing? What is represented by "B' (separate answer with a comma)

    Explanation
    • Lining of the oral cavity
    • Epithelium with an
    underlying connective
    tissue (the lamina
    propria).
    • Third layer (the
    submucosa) is found
    between the lamina
    propria and the
    underlying bone (palate)
    or muscle (cheeks and
    lips).

    2 LAMINA PROPRIA LAYERS =
    Superficial, papillary layer between the
    epithelial ridges, in which the collagen fibres are thin
    and loosely arranged.
    -Deep, reticular layer dominated by thick,
    parallel bundles of collagen fibres.

    Section showing regions of oral mucosa. A = stratified squamous epithelium; B =
    lamina propria; C = submucosa; D = bone

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  • 7. 

    The submucosa layer consists of very tight connective tissue containing fat deposits and glands. Larger nerves and blood vessels also run through the submucosa.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The submucosa layer consists of loose connective tissue containing fat deposits and glands. Larger nerves and blood vessels also run through the submucosa.

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  • 8. 

    What is this photo of? What layer is "B" called? (separate answers by a comma)

    Correct Answer
    keratinized oral epithelium, prickle cell layer
    Explanation
    Section showing layers of keratinized oral epithelium.
    A = basal layer (single cell layer, cuboidal cells, stem cells originate here that generate "transit-amplifying cells that give rise to replacement keratinocytes")
    B = prickle cell layer (above basal cell layer, round or ovoid, desmosomes increase in # and become more obvious than basal)
    C = granular layer (increased in maturation, cells are larger and flatter contain keratohyaline granules w/ filaggrin that binds keratin filaments together into a stable network)
    D = keratinized layer (final stage of maturation, loss of all organelles, autolysis due to proteases. Filled entirely with tonofilaments surrounded by matrix protein filaggrin)

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  • 9. 

    What layer is this depicting?

    Correct Answer
    Basal cell layer
    Explanation
    Section of oral epithelium showing cells undergoing cell replication (red stain).

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  • 10. 

    What layer is this?

    Correct Answer
    prickle cell layer
    Explanation
    Characterized by desmosomes between cells that look 'prickly"

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  • 11. 

    What layer is "B" depicting?

    Correct Answer
    granular layer
    Explanation
    granular layer is between prickle (A) and keratinized (C)

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  • 12. 

    This photo is depicting orthokeratinized oral epithelium characterized by the presence of small and shrunken nuclei.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    In some areas such as the gingiva the nuclei may be retained, although small and shrunken. These cells are described as parakeratinized (in contrast to the more usual orthokeratinized cells without nuclei)

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  • 13. 

    This photo depicts lining epithelium of the oral mucosa. Is there keratin present in this photo?

    Correct Answer
    no
    Explanation
    -Non keratinized epithelium , Lack of keratohylaine granules , Absence of filaggrin , less developed and dispersed tonofilaments present in lining epithelium.

    -The outer layers are usually termed the intermediate (stratum intermedium) and superficial (stratum superficiale) layers.

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  • 14. 

    Which of the following is not a type of oral mucosa?

    • A.

      Masticatory

    • B.

      Specalized

    • C.

      Keratinized

    • D.

      Lining

    Correct Answer
    C. Keratinized
    Explanation
    Within the oral cavity about 60% of the mucosa is lining mucosa, about 25% of the mucosa is masticatory mucosa and the
    remaining 15% specialized mucosa.

    Masticatory mucosa is found where there is high
    compression and friction, and is characterized by a
    keratinized epithelium and a thick lamina propria. Eg :
    gingiva and palate
    • Lining mucosa is not subject to high levels of friction but
    must be mobile and distensible. It is thus non-keratinized
    and has a loose lamina propria. Within the lamina
    propria, the collagen fibres are arranged as a network to
    allow free movement, and the elastic fibres allow recoil to
    prevent the mucosa being chewed. Commonly, lining
    mucosa also has a submucosa. The lips, cheeks, alveolus,
    floor of the mouth, ventral surface of the tongue and soft
    palate have a lining mucosa.
    • Specialized mucosa : the specialized gustatory mucosa of
    the dorsum of the tongue and where the vermilion zone
    forms a transition between the skin and the oral mucosa.

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  • 15. 

    What kind of taste bud is pictured?

    • A.

      Filliform

    • B.

      Fungiform

    • C.

      Circumvalate

    • D.

      Foliate

    Correct Answer
    A. Filliform
    Explanation
    Section showing dorsum of anterior two-thirds of tongue covered by keratinized
    filiform papillae (A) with non-keratinized regions between (B)

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  • 16. 

    What kind of papilla is pictured?

    • A.

      Filliform

    • B.

      Fungiform

    • C.

      Circumvalate

    • D.

      Foliate

    Correct Answer
    B. Fungiform
    Explanation
    Section of fungiform papilla on dorsal surface of anterior part of tongue
    showing taste buds (arrowed). The papilla is keratinized (H & E; ×120). (b) High-power view
    of surface of fungiform papilla seen in (a), showing taste buds (arrows) (×240).

    Rate this question:

  • 17. 

    What kind of papilla is pictured?

    • A.

      Filliform

    • B.

      Fungiform

    • C.

      Circumvalate

    • D.

      Foliate

    Correct Answer
    C. Circumvalate
    Explanation
    Section of circumvallate papilla (A). Serous glands (B) of von Ebner empty via ducts
    into the base of the trench (C) surrounding the papilla, which is not raised above the surface
    of the tongue. D = muscle of tongue.

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  • 18. 

    What kind of papilla is pictured?

    • A.

      Filliform

    • B.

      Fungiform

    • C.

      Circumvalate

    • D.

      Foliate

    Correct Answer
    D. Foliate
    Explanation
    Section of foliate papilla showing taste buds (arrowed). Note the adjacent
    lymphoid material characteristic of the posterior part of the tongue.

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  • 19. 

    What structure is the image picturing? What is "C'? (separate answer with comma)

    Correct Answer
    lip, sebaceous gland
    Explanation
    Section of skin of lip. A = keratinized epidermis; B = shaft of hair; C = sebaceous
    gland; D = dermis.

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  • 20. 

    This photo is picturing the vermillion "red-zone" of the lip

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Section of red zone of lip. A = keratinized epithelium; B = lamina propria. Note the
    folded interface between epithelium and lamina propria bringing blood vessels (C) close to
    the surface.

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  • 21. 

    What is this photo of? What is "D"? (separate answers w/ comma)

    Correct Answer
    buccal mucosa, salivary gland
    Explanation
    This photo is of the buccal mucosa, which is the lining of the inner cheeks. Additionally, "D" refers to the salivary gland, which is a gland that produces saliva and is located in the buccal mucosa.

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  • 22. 

    In this photo of gingiva, what is the arrow pointing to?

    Correct Answer
    mucogingival junction
    Explanation
    Section of the attached gingiva (A) and alveolar mucosa stripped off from underlying
    bone. The arrow points to the sharp demarcation site of the mucogingival junction. Note the
    keratinized epithelium covering the attached gingiva, the non-keratinized epithelium covering
    the alveolar mucosa and the numerous blood vessels in the alveolar mucosa.

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  • 23. 

    This photo is of attached gingiva, what are the arrows indicating?

    Correct Answer
    stippling
    Explanation
    Section of the attached gingiva. The epithelium is a keratinized stratified squamous
    epithelium. The lamina propria is dense and relatively avascular and the interface with the
    epithelium is highly folded. The lamina propria is directly attached to the underlying alveolar
    bone (A), forming a mucoperiosteum. Arrows indicate surface stippling.

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  • 24. 

    What is "A" indicating? What is "B"? (separate answers w/ comma)

    Correct Answer
    junctional epithelium, root
    Explanation
    Demineralized section showing junctional epithelium (A) having proliferated
    rootwards to lie on cemental surface of root (B). C = enamel space; D = dentine.

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  • 25. 

    This photo is showing interdental gingiva. "B" is showing the alveolar crest

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Demineralized section showing the interdental gingiva (A) between two cheek teeth
    in the anteroposterior plane. B = alveolar crest; C = transseptal group of gingival fibres

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  • 26. 

    True or false, this image is of keratinized epithelium of the soft palate

    Correct Answer
    false
    Explanation
    Section of the masticatory keratinized epithelium (A) of the hard palate. Note the
    highly folded interface with the lamina propria (B).

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  • 27. 

    This photo was taken during the 6th week of development. What is the arrow point to?

    Correct Answer
    primary epithelial band
    Explanation
    Oral epithelium thickens
    and invaginates into the
    mesenchyme to form a
    primary epithelial band.
    • The first sign of tooth
    development is the
    condensation of
    mesenchymal tissue which
    are ectomesenchymal
    (neural crest) in origin,
    having migrated into the
    jaws from the margins of
    the neural tube.

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  • 28. 

    This image was taken during the 7th week of development. What is "A"?

    Correct Answer
    vestibular lamina
    Explanation
    The vestibular lamina (A) and dental lamina (B) seen at the 7th week of intra-uterine life.

    the primary epithelial band divides into two processes: a
    buccally located vestibular lamina and a lingually situated dental
    lamina.
    • The vestibular lamina contributes to the development of the vestibule
    of the mouth, delineating the lips and cheeks from the tooth-bearing
    regions. Cells of the vestibular lamina proliferate, with subsequent
    degeneration of the central epithelial cells to produce the sulcus of
    the vestibule.

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  • 29. 

    The stages in tooth development consists of 1) Initiation, 2) Morphogenesis, 3) Histogenesis

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Initiation- the sites of the future teeth are established,
    appearance of tooth germs along an invagination of the
    oral epithelium called the dental lamina.
    • Morphogenesis- the shape of the tooth is determined by a
    combination of cell proliferation and cell movement.
    • Histogenesis- differentiation of cells (begun during
    morphogenesis) proceeds to give rise to the fully formed
    dental tissues, both mineralized (i.e. enamel, dentine and
    cementum) and unmineralized (i.e. dental pulp and
    periodontium)

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  • 30. 

    What stage of morphodifferentation is this image? What is "A" and "B"? (separate w/ comma)

    Correct Answer
    bud stage, enamel organ, mesenchymal condensation
    Explanation
    Bud stage of tooth development. A = enamel organ; B = mesenchymal condensation

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  • 31. 

    What stage of morphodifferentiation is this image?

    Correct Answer
    cap stage
    Explanation
    Early cap stage of tooth development (arrows). A = Meckel's cartilage; B = developing tongue

    11th week
    morphogenesis- the
    deeper surface of the
    enamel organ
    invaginating to form a
    cap-shaped structure.
    • Poorly
    histodifferentiated.
    • External and internal
    dental epithelium
    forming.

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  • 32. 

    What stage of morphodifferentiation is this image in? What is "A"? (separate answer w/ comma)

    Correct Answer
    late cap stage, stellate reticulum
    Explanation
    Late cap stage of tooth development. A = stellate reticulum; B = external enamel epithelium; C = internal enamel epithelium; D = dental papilla; E = dental follicle

    12th week (late cap stage)- the central cells of the enlarging
    enamel organ have become separated (although
    maintaining contact by desmosomes), the intercellular
    spaces containing significant quantities of
    glycosaminoglycans. This is called stellate reticulum.
    • The cells of the external enamel epithelium remain
    cuboidal.
    • Internal enamel epithelium cells become more columnar,
    increase in RNA content and hydrolytic and oxidative
    enzyme activity.
    • The part of the mesenchyme lying beneath the internal
    enamel epithelium is termed the dental papilla, while that
    surrounding the tooth germ forms the dental follicle.

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  • 33. 

    This photo is of the Early Bell Stage. What week is this occurring at?

    Correct Answer
    14
    Explanation
    14th week- further morphodifferentiation and
    histodifferentiation of the tooth germ lead to the early
    bell stage of the internal enamel epithelium broadly
    maps out the occlusal pattern of the crown of the
    tooth (differential mitosis).
    • The future cusps and incisal margins are sites of
    precocious cell maturation associated with cessation of
    mitosis, while areas corresponding to the fissures and
    margins of the tooth remain mitotically active. Thus,
    cusp height is related more to continued downward
    growth at the margin and fissures than to upward
    extension of the cusps.

    Dental lamina breaks down and the enamel organ
    loses connection with the oral epithelium.
    • A high degree of histodifferentiation is achieved
    in the early bell stage.
    • The enamel organ shows four distinct layers:
    external enamel epithelium, stellate reticulum,
    stratum intermedium and internal enamel
    epithelium.
    • The cervical loop at the margins of the enlarging
    bell-shaped enamel organ is a site of mitotic
    activity.

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  • 34. 

    The Enamel Organ consists of 4 distinct layers. Which of these layers actually forms the enamel?

    • A.

      External Enamel Epithelium

    • B.

      Stellate Reticulum

    • C.

      Internal Enamel Epithelium

    • D.

      Stratum Intermedium

    • E.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    C. Internal Enamel Epithelium
    Explanation
    Enamel organ shows four distinct layers:
    - External enamel epithelium
    - Stellate reticulum
    - Stratum intermedium
    - Internal enamel epithelium (forms enamel
    whereas the first three layers provide support
    to the developing tooth)

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  • 35. 

    The Late Bell stage is associated with the formation of hard dental tissues during Week 15

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    week 18

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  • 36. 

    What stage during enamel and dentine formation is depicted here?

    Correct Answer
    late bell stage
    Explanation
    Enamel and dentine formation
    commencing at the tips of future cusps
    (or incisal edges).
    • Under the inductive influence of
    developing ameloblasts (preameloblasts), the adjacent mesenchymal
    cells of the dental papilla become
    columnar and differentiate into
    odontoblasts.
    • The odontoblasts then become involved
    in the formation of predentine and
    dentine. The presence of dentine then
    induces the ameloblasts to secrete
    enamel.
    Fig 21.16: Late bell stage (appositional stage) of tooth development. Dentine matrix stained
    blue; enamel matrix stained red. A = permanent tooth.

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  • 37. 

    The Transitionary Structures are which of the following

    • A.

      Enamel knot

    • B.

      Dentine root

    • C.

      Enamel cord

    • D.

      Dentine reticulate

    • E.

      Dentine niche

    • F.

      Enamel niche

    • G.

      Odontoblasts

    • H.

      Late bell stage

    • I.

      Bell stage

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Enamel knot
    C. Enamel cord
    F. Enamel niche
    Explanation
    The transitionary structures mentioned in the answer are all related to the development of enamel in teeth. Enamel knot, enamel cord, and enamel niche are all structures that form during tooth development and play a role in enamel formation. These structures are involved in the differentiation and organization of the cells that produce enamel. Therefore, they are considered transitionary structures in the process of enamel development.

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  • 38. 

    What transitionary structure is pictured?

    Correct Answer(s)
    enamel knot
    Explanation
    – Localized mass of cells in the
    centre of the internal enamel
    epithelium.
    – Forms a bulge into the dental
    papilla, at the centre of the
    enamel organ.
    – It might play a role in the
    formation of crown pattern
    by outlining the central
    fissure. However, it soon
    disappears and seems to
    contribute cells to the enamel
    cord .
    – The disappearance of the
    enamel knot by the bell stage
    may be associated with
    apoptosis.

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  • 39. 

    This is a developing root, what is "B"?

    Correct Answer(s)
    dental papilla
    Explanation
    The developing root. A =epithelial root sheath, B= dental papilla; C = primary
    apical foramen; D = dental follicle; E = developing root dentine; F = odontoblast layer

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  • 40. 

    What transitionary structure is pictured?

    Correct Answer(s)
    enamel niche
    Explanation
    The enamel niche is seen
    where the tooth germ
    appears to have a double
    attachment to the dental
    lamina (the lateral and
    medial enamel strands).
    These strands enclose the
    enamel niche, which
    appears as a funnel-shaped
    depression containing
    connective tissue.
    – The functional significance
    of the enamel niche is
    unknown.
    Fig 21.21: The enamel niche (C). A = lateral
    enamel strand; B = medial enamel strand

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  • 41. 

    What transitionary structure is pictured?

    Correct Answer(s)
    enamel cord
    Explanation
    Strand of cells seen at the
    early bell stage of
    development extending from
    the stratum intermedium into
    the stellate reticulum.
    – It overlies the incisal margin
    of a tooth or the apex of the
    first cusp to develop (primary
    cusp).
    – may be involved in the
    process by which the cap
    stage is transformed into the
    bell stage (acting as a
    mechanical tie) or that it is a
    focus for the origin of stellate
    reticulum cells.
    Fig 21.20: The enamel cord (A). B = enamel navel

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  • 42. 

    What is happening in this photo?

    Correct Answer(s)
    erupting deciduous molar
    Explanation
    An erupting deciduous molar before its emergence into the oral cavity. A = enamel
    space; B = developing roots; C = developing alveolar crypt; D = oral mucosa and overlying
    connective tissue; E = reduced enamel epithelium .

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  • 43. 

    What is that arrow pointing to in this image of an erupting tooth?

    Correct Answer(s)
    reduced dental epithelium
    Explanation
    The soft tissues overlying the enamel space (A) of an erupting tooth. B = oral
    epithelium; C = connective tissue between developing tooth and oral epithelium. Arrow
    indicates the reduced enamel epithelium

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  • 44. 

    This photo is of an erupting tooth, with "C" and "B" fusing to make an epithelium lined pathway for the tooth. "D" is depicting enamel space.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    An erupting tooth (A) about to emerge into the oral cavity through an
    epithelium-lined pathway as a result of fusion of the oral epithelium (B) and the reduced
    enamel epithelium (C) D = enamel space

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  • 45. 

    What is "C" pointing to?

    Correct Answer
    Gubernacular canal
    Explanation
    A specialized feature associated with the erupting permanent tooth
    is the presence of a gubernacular canal. The gubernacular canal
    contains the gubernacular cord.
    • The cord is composed of a central strand of epithelium (derived
    from the dental lamina) surrounded by connective tissue. The
    connective tissue is organized into inner and outer layers. Collagen
    fibres of the inner layer show greater organization and run mainly
    parallel to the long axis of the epithelium. In the outer layer, the
    collagen fibres are fewer and less organized. Differences between
    the layers can also be discerned with respect to the vasculature, the
    vessels in the outer layer being larger. During eruption, the
    gubernacular cords decrease in length but increase in thickness and
    become less dense.
    • Surgical removal of the cord does not prevent eruption of the
    permanent tooth.

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  • 46. 

    In this photo of a resorbing tooth, what are the arrows pointing to?

    Correct Answer
    odontoclasts
    Explanation
    Buccolingual section through a resorbing deciduous tooth (A) and its erupting
    successor (B). Arrows indicate multinucleated odontoclasts

    Resorption of the hard tissues of the deciduous tooth
    takes place by the activity of multinucleated osteoclastlike cells termed odontoclasts. The vascular, resorbing
    tissue has been termed the resorbing organ of Tomes.
    • Odontoclasts lie within resorption lacunae (Howship's
    lacunae). Odontoclasts, like osteoclasts, differentiate
    from circulating monocyte-like cells. They are
    vacuolated and have long cytoplasmic processes, an
    abundance of ribosomes and a large number of
    mitochondria. Howship's lacunae in resorbing teeth
    tend to be larger and more spherical than lacunae in
    bone.

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  • 47. 

    Because resorption of teeth is not continuous, repair occurs as well with cementum by cementoblast type cells. If the repair process prevails over the resorption, this is called?

    Correct Answer
    Ankylosis
    Explanation
    Resorption of deciduous teeth is not a continuous
    process. During rest periods, reparative tissue
    may be formed, leading to a reattachment of the
    periodontal ligament. The tissue of repair is
    cementum-like and the cells responsible for its
    formation are similar in appearance to
    cementoblasts . If the repair process prevails over
    the resorption, the tooth may become ankylosed
    to the surrounding bone, with loss of the
    periodontal ligament . Ankylosis may also be
    caused by trauma or infection of a tooth

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  • 48. 

    What is this picture showing? What is labelled by "B"? (separate answers with a comma)

    Correct Answer
    initial enamel formation, ameloblasts
    Explanation
    Initial stage of enamel formation. A = odontoblasts; B = ameloblasts; C = stratum
    intermedium D = stellate reticulum; E = external enamel epithelium; F = developing enamel; G =
    developing dentine

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  • 49. 

    What type of enamel prism structure is this?

    Correct Answer
    keyhole
    Explanation
    The three prism patterns seen in human enamel. In pattern I enamel the prisms
    are circular. In pattern II enamel the prisms are aligned in parallel rows. In pattern III
    enamel the prisms are arranged in staggered rows such that the tail of a prism lies between
    two heads in the next row, giving a keyhole appearance.

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  • 50. 

    1) What are the other names for short and long periods of incremental lines respectively? (separate answers w/ comma). This photo represents periods of long incremental periods.

    Correct Answer
    cross-striations, enamel striae
    Explanation
    During development changes in the enamel
    secretory rhythm, chemical composition
    and/or the position of the developing enamel
    front are recorded as incremental features.
    There are two main types of incremental line:
    short period (cross-striations) and long period
    (enamel striae)

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Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 22, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Apr 03, 2018
    Quiz Created by
    Siroishka
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