Characteristics And Types Of Wetland

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Water Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What are some characteristics of a swamp?

    • A.

      Wet ground

    • B.

      Woody vegetation

    • C.

      Spread root systems

    • D.

      Herbaceous vegetation

    • E.

      Peat soil

    • F.

      Close proximity to river floodplains

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Wet ground
    B. Woody vegetation
    C. Spread root systems
    Explanation
    The characteristics of a swamp include wet ground, woody vegetation, and spread root systems. Swamps are characterized by their waterlogged environment, making the ground constantly wet. They are also filled with woody vegetation such as trees and shrubs, which are adapted to survive in the water-rich conditions. The spread root systems help these plants anchor themselves in the soft, muddy soil. These characteristics create a unique ecosystem that supports a variety of herbaceous vegetation and contributes to the formation of peat soil. Swamps are often found in close proximity to river floodplains, further contributing to their water-rich environment.

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  • 2. 

    What are some characteristics of a marsh?

    • A.

      Herbaceous vegetation

    • B.

      Highly productive

    • C.

      Woody vegetation

    • D.

      Peat soil

    • E.

      Close proximity to river floodplains

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Herbaceous vegetation
    B. Highly productive
    Explanation
    A marsh is a type of wetland characterized by herbaceous vegetation, which refers to non-woody plants such as grasses and sedges. Marshes are highly productive ecosystems, meaning they have a high rate of plant growth and support a diverse range of plant and animal life. They typically have peat soil, which is rich in organic matter and retains water, creating a wet and waterlogged environment. While marshes are often found in close proximity to river floodplains, the presence of woody vegetation is not a characteristic of marshes.

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  • 3. 

    What are some characteristics of a bog?

    • A.

      Filled-in kettle ponds

    • B.

      Sphagnum moss

    • C.

      Peat soil

    • D.

      Plants growing on top, hiding a false bottom

    • E.

      Highly acidic

    • F.

      Inflow and outflow

    • G.

      Woody vegetation

    • H.

      Herbaceous vegetation

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Filled-in kettle ponds
    B. Sphagnum moss
    C. Peat soil
    D. Plants growing on top, hiding a false bottom
    E. Highly acidic
    Explanation
    A bog is characterized by several features. Filled-in kettle ponds refers to the formation of bogs in depressions left by melting glaciers. Sphagnum moss is a common plant found in bogs that helps retain water and create a unique acidic environment. Peat soil is formed from decomposed plant material and is a defining characteristic of bogs. Plants growing on top, hiding a false bottom is a feature of bogs where vegetation appears to be growing on solid ground, but is actually floating on water. Bogs are highly acidic due to the accumulation of organic acids. Inflow and outflow refers to the movement of water in and out of the bog, which is important for maintaining its unique ecosystem. Finally, woody and herbaceous vegetation are both found in bogs, contributing to their biodiversity.

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  • 4. 

    What are some characteristics of a fen?

    • A.

      Peat soil

    • B.

      Sphagnum moss

    • C.

      Inflow and outflow

    • D.

      Plants growing over false bottom

    • E.

      Woody vegetation

    • F.

      Herbaceous vegetation

    • G.

      No inflow or outflow

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Peat soil
    B. Sphagnum moss
    C. Inflow and outflow
    D. Plants growing over false bottom
    Explanation
    A fen is a type of wetland characterized by peat soil, which is formed from partially decomposed plant material. It is also characterized by the presence of sphagnum moss, which helps to retain water and create acidic conditions. Fens typically have inflow and outflow of water, allowing for a continuous exchange of nutrients. Plants in a fen often grow over a false bottom, which is a layer of accumulated organic matter. Fens can have both woody vegetation, such as shrubs and trees, and herbaceous vegetation, such as grasses and sedges.

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  • 5. 

    What is a wet meadow?

    • A.

      "Prairie potholes" along river floodplains

    • B.

      Highly productive wetlands filled with herbaceous vegetation

    • C.

      Like a bog, but with inflow and outflow

    • D.

      A field of grass no more than 10 feet underwater

    Correct Answer
    A. "Prairie potholes" along river floodplains
    Explanation
    A wet meadow refers to "prairie potholes" along river floodplains. These are areas that are characterized by being highly productive wetlands filled with herbaceous vegetation. Unlike a bog, a wet meadow has both inflow and outflow of water. It is not a field of grass that is submerged underwater, but rather a wetland habitat found in low-lying areas along rivers.

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  • 6. 

    What kinds of trees generally grow in a swamp?

    • A.

      Cyprus

    • B.

      Mangrove

    • C.

      Oak

    • D.

      Sugar maple

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Cyprus
    B. Mangrove
    Explanation
    Cyprus and Mangrove trees are generally found in swamps. These trees have adapted to the wet and waterlogged conditions of swamps. They have specialized root systems that help them to survive in the water and extract nutrients. Cyprus trees are commonly found in swamps in the southeastern United States, while Mangrove trees are found in tropical and subtropical regions around the world. Oak and Sugar maple trees, on the other hand, are not typically found in swamps as they prefer well-drained soil conditions.

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  • 7. 

    What are some functions of a wetland?

    • A.

      Groundwater recharge and discharge

    • B.

      Sediment stabilization

    • C.

      Toxin retention

    • D.

      Nutrient removal and transformation

    • E.

      Carbon transformation due to being a carbon sink

    • F.

      Oxygen production

    • G.

      Wildlife diversity, breeding, migration, and wintering

    • H.

      Aquatic diversity and abundance

    • I.

      Human culture and recreation

    • J.

      Drinking water

    • K.

      Being the opposite of deserts

    • L.

      Swimming

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Groundwater recharge and discharge
    B. Sediment stabilization
    C. Toxin retention
    D. Nutrient removal and transformation
    E. Carbon transformation due to being a carbon sink
    F. Oxygen production
    G. Wildlife diversity, breeding, migration, and wintering
    H. Aquatic diversity and abundance
    I. Human culture and recreation
    Explanation
    Wetlands serve various functions including groundwater recharge and discharge, sediment stabilization, toxin retention, nutrient removal and transformation, carbon transformation as a carbon sink, oxygen production, supporting wildlife diversity, breeding, migration, and wintering, promoting aquatic diversity and abundance, contributing to human culture and recreation, and providing drinking water. They are not the opposite of deserts and may not always be suitable for swimming.

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  • 8. 

    What is a carbon sink?

    • A.

      A peaty, acidic wetland that doesn't allow carbon to go back into the soil, and is thus filled with organic matter

    • B.

      A sink with faucets that bring C rather than H2O

    • C.

      Sourced from a rock, deep within the Earth's crust, that draws carbon to it like a magnet

    • D.

      Something only found in a swamp

    Correct Answer
    A. A peaty, acidic wetland that doesn't allow carbon to go back into the soil, and is thus filled with organic matter
    Explanation
    A carbon sink refers to a peaty, acidic wetland that doesn't allow carbon to go back into the soil. These wetlands are filled with organic matter, which acts as a storage for carbon. As plants and other organisms in the wetland die, their organic matter decomposes slowly due to the acidic and waterlogged conditions, preventing the release of carbon dioxide back into the atmosphere. This makes carbon sinks important in mitigating climate change by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it long-term.

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  • 9. 

    Rainforests produce more oxygen than wetlands

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Rainforests do not produce more oxygen than wetlands. While rainforests are often referred to as the "lungs of the Earth," it is actually the phytoplankton in the world's oceans and other aquatic ecosystems, including wetlands, that produce the majority of the Earth's oxygen. These microscopic organisms undergo photosynthesis and release oxygen into the atmosphere. Wetlands, with their high plant productivity and diverse aquatic life, are particularly important in oxygen production and carbon sequestration. Therefore, the statement that rainforests produce more oxygen than wetlands is false.

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  • 10. 

    What are a few characteristics of any wetland?

    • A.

      Hydric soils

    • B.

      Water

    • C.

      Distinct biota

    • D.

      Peat

    • E.

      Herbaceous vegetation

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Hydric soils
    B. Water
    C. Distinct biota
    Explanation
    Wetlands are characterized by several key features. Hydric soils refer to soils that are permanently or seasonally saturated with water, creating an environment suitable for wetland plants. The presence of water is another defining characteristic of wetlands, as they are typically flooded or have waterlogged conditions. Distinct biota, or unique plant and animal species adapted to wetland environments, are also found in wetlands. Peat, which is partially decayed organic matter, is often present in wetlands and contributes to their unique ecosystem. Finally, wetlands are characterized by herbaceous vegetation, such as grasses and sedges, which are adapted to the wet conditions.

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  • 11. 

    Vernal pools are considered wetlands

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Vernal pools are considered wetlands because they are temporary bodies of water that form during the spring or rainy season. These pools provide important habitats for various plant and animal species, including amphibians and insects. They support a unique ecosystem and play a crucial role in water filtration and flood control. Due to their ecological significance and the presence of characteristic wetland vegetation, vernal pools are classified as wetlands.

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  • 12. 

    Clays and organic matter in soil combine cations, aiding in decomposition

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Clays and organic matter in soil have the ability to combine cations, which are positively charged ions. This process aids in the decomposition of organic matter in the soil. Cations play a crucial role in nutrient availability and uptake by plants. By combining with cations, clays and organic matter help to release these nutrients into the soil, making them more accessible for plant roots. This enhances the decomposition process and promotes healthy soil fertility. Therefore, the statement "Clays and organic matter in soil combine cations, aiding in decomposition" is true.

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  • 13. 

    Why did we drain the Everglades?

    • A.

      Development

    • B.

      To enjoy the natural environment

    • C.

      For fun

    • D.

      To help the cattail populations

    Correct Answer
    A. Development
    Explanation
    The reason for draining the Everglades was for development purposes. This suggests that the intention was to utilize the land for human activities such as agriculture, urbanization, or infrastructure development. By draining the Everglades, the aim was likely to convert the wetland ecosystem into a more suitable environment for human use and economic growth.

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  • 14. 

    What happened after we stated draining the Everglades?

    • A.

      We found good farming soil, and drained more

    • B.

      There were fewer mosquitoes, and fewer cases of malaria

    • C.

      Soil level dropped due to organic matter being exposed to oxygen

    • D.

      We didn't drain the Everglades, hence the ever

    • E.

      We found dry, sandy soil, and couldn't grow anything there

    • F.

      Native species were suddenly in jeopardy

    • G.

      Condo complexes grew out of the ground instead of trees

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. We found good farming soil, and drained more
    B. There were fewer mosquitoes, and fewer cases of malaria
    C. Soil level dropped due to organic matter being exposed to oxygen
    F. Native species were suddenly in jeopardy
    Explanation
    After we started draining the Everglades, we discovered that the soil was suitable for farming, which led us to drain more of the area. Additionally, the drainage resulted in a decrease in the number of mosquitoes and cases of malaria. However, this process also caused the soil level to drop as the organic matter was exposed to oxygen. Furthermore, the native species in the Everglades were suddenly at risk and in jeopardy due to the drainage.

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  • 15. 

    Why did the soil level drop after the Everglades were drained?

    • A.

      It was full of organic matter, which was consumed by microbes when it got in contact with oxygen

    • B.

      It compacted

    • C.

      Too much of it was shipped elsewhere

    • D.

      It didn't

    Correct Answer
    A. It was full of organic matter, which was consumed by microbes when it got in contact with oxygen
    Explanation
    When the Everglades were drained, the soil level dropped because it was full of organic matter. Once the soil came in contact with oxygen, microbes consumed the organic matter, causing it to break down and decompose. This process of decomposition led to a decrease in the overall volume of the soil, resulting in a drop in the soil level.

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  • 16. 

    Why is macroinvertebrate sampling a good way of observing a stream ecosystem?

    • A.

      Fish eat macroinvertebrates

    • B.

      They aid in nutrient cycling

    • C.

      Some are more sensitive than others

    • D.

      They are largely sessile

    • E.

      They are highly resistant to environmental changes, so if there are macroinvertebrates and nothing else, the stream is polluted

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Fish eat macroinvertebrates
    B. They aid in nutrient cycling
    C. Some are more sensitive than others
    D. They are largely sessile
    Explanation
    Macroinvertebrate sampling is a good way of observing a stream ecosystem because fish feed on macroinvertebrates, indicating their presence in the ecosystem. Macroinvertebrates also play a crucial role in nutrient cycling within the stream, helping to break down organic matter. Additionally, the sensitivity of different macroinvertebrate species to environmental changes can provide valuable information about the health and quality of the stream ecosystem. Lastly, the fact that macroinvertebrates are largely sessile means that they are more likely to be present in the same location for a longer period, making them easier to sample and study.

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  • 17. 

    What is groundwater depletion?

    • A.

      When we take water out of an aquifer faster than it can be replenished

    • B.

      When some of the groundwater is contaminated, and the usable amount is depleted

    • C.

      When the water on the ground dries up

    • D.

      When groundwater is sucked into a confined aquifer

    Correct Answer
    A. When we take water out of an aquifer faster than it can be replenished
    Explanation
    Groundwater depletion refers to the process of extracting water from an aquifer at a rate that exceeds its natural recharge or replenishment. This occurs when water is withdrawn from the aquifer faster than it can be naturally replenished through precipitation or other sources. As a result, the water table drops, wells may run dry, and the overall availability of groundwater diminishes. This can lead to various consequences such as land subsidence, saltwater intrusion, and ecological imbalances. It is a significant concern in many regions where groundwater is a vital source of freshwater for drinking, agriculture, and industrial purposes.

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  • 18. 

    Which variables are needed to find the source of groundwater contaminants?

    • A.

      Flow velocity

    • B.

      Flow direction

    • C.

      Size of aquifer

    • D.

      Depth underground

    • E.

      Type of pollutant

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Flow velocity
    B. Flow direction
    C. Size of aquifer
    Explanation
    To find the source of groundwater contaminants, several variables are needed. Flow velocity and flow direction are crucial as they help determine the movement and direction of the contaminants, which can lead to the source. The size of the aquifer is also important as it affects the spread and distribution of the contaminants. Additionally, the depth underground is significant as it can indicate the potential sources of pollution. Lastly, the type of pollutant is necessary to identify the specific contaminant and its potential sources.

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  • 19. 

    Which pollutants are most commonly found in groundwater?

    • A.

      Pfos

    • B.

      TCE

    • C.

      Chloride

    • D.

      Salts

    • E.

      Nitrogen

    • F.

      MtBE

    • G.

      Arsenic

    • H.

      Radon

    • I.

      Uranium

    • J.

      Oils

    • K.

      Phosphorus

    • L.

      Litter

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Pfos
    B. TCE
    C. Chloride
    D. Salts
    E. Nitrogen
    F. MtBE
    G. Arsenic
    H. Radon
    I. Uranium
    Explanation
    The pollutants that are most commonly found in groundwater include Pfos, TCE, chloride, salts, nitrogen, MtBE, arsenic, radon, uranium. These substances can contaminate groundwater through various sources such as industrial waste, agricultural runoff, and improper disposal of chemicals. They pose a significant risk to human health and the environment, and their presence in groundwater requires proper monitoring and remediation efforts.

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  • 20. 

    What did Pierre Ferrault do to learn about groundwater?

    • A.

      He quantified precipitation

    • B.

      He discovered that precipitation exceeds river discharge by 600%

    • C.

      He didn't account for evaporation

    • D.

      He thought it came from the sea

    • E.

      He discovered percolation

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. He quantified precipitation
    B. He discovered that precipitation exceeds river discharge by 600%
    C. He didn't account for evaporation
    Explanation
    Pierre Ferrault learned about groundwater by quantifying precipitation and discovering that precipitation exceeds river discharge by 600%. However, he didn't account for evaporation in his study.

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  • 21. 

    Which of the following are steps on the nitrogen cycle?

    • A.

      Nitrification

    • B.

      Denitrification

    • C.

      Nitrogen gas released into atmosphere

    • D.

      Oxification

    • E.

      Carbonization

    • F.

      Deoxification

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Nitrification
    B. Denitrification
    C. Nitrogen gas released into atmosphere
    Explanation
    The nitrogen cycle is a natural process that involves the conversion of nitrogen from one form to another. Nitrification is the process by which ammonia is converted into nitrites and then into nitrates by bacteria. Denitrification is the process by which nitrates are converted back into nitrogen gas by bacteria. Nitrogen gas is released into the atmosphere during denitrification. Therefore, the correct steps on the nitrogen cycle are nitrification, denitrification, and nitrogen gas released into the atmosphere.

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  • 22. 

    The green agricultural movement is dedicated is using less fertilizer, and other ways of being more environmentally friendly

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The statement suggests that the green agricultural movement is dedicated to using less fertilizer and finding other environmentally friendly methods. However, the correct answer is False because the given statement contains a grammatical error. It should be "The green agricultural movement is dedicated to using less fertilizer and finding other ways of being more environmentally friendly." Therefore, the correct answer is False.

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  • 23. 

    What is an artesian well?

    • A.

      When the top of a well is below the top of an aquifer

    • B.

      A hole in the ground lined with stones, with a little roof, and a bucket on a crank

    • C.

      A well with pretty colors

    • D.

      A well that taps into exactly the middle of an aquifer

    Correct Answer
    A. When the top of a well is below the top of an aquifer
    Explanation
    An artesian well is a type of well where the top of the well is positioned below the top of an aquifer. This allows for natural pressure to push water up through the well without the need for pumping. The pressure is created by the weight of the water in the aquifer, and when the well is drilled into a confined aquifer, the water is forced to rise to the surface. This type of well can provide a reliable and continuous source of water without the need for external energy sources.

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  • 24. 

    What is a cone of depression?

    • A.

      What happens in an confined aquifer when a well is taking water out

    • B.

      A cone of sadness filled when one's well water is filled with contaminants

    • C.

      An empty ice cream cone

    • D.

      When the soil dips down around the top of a well

    Correct Answer
    A. What happens in an confined aquifer when a well is taking water out
    Explanation
    A cone of depression occurs in a confined aquifer when water is being pumped out of a well. As water is extracted from the well, the water level in the aquifer around the well drops, creating a cone-shaped depression in the water table. This cone-shaped depression represents the area where the water level has been lowered due to the pumping action. The cone of depression can extend both horizontally and vertically, depending on the rate of pumping and the characteristics of the aquifer.

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  • 25. 

    Why is the Ogallala Aquifer interesting and important?

    • A.

      It's fun to say

    • B.

      It's the largest aquifer in North America

    • C.

      It's the reason the Wheat Belt even exists

    • D.

      It's shrinking

    • E.

      It's an unconfined aquifer

    • F.

      It's a confined aquifer

    • G.

      It's growing

    • H.

      It's the smallest aquifer in China

    • I.

      It's not

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. It's fun to say
    B. It's the largest aquifer in North America
    C. It's the reason the Wheat Belt even exists
    D. It's shrinking
    E. It's an unconfined aquifer
    Explanation
    The Ogallala Aquifer is interesting and important for several reasons. First, it's fun to say, which may make it more memorable and engaging for people learning about it. Second, it's the largest aquifer in North America, making it a significant water source for the region. Third, it's the reason the Wheat Belt even exists, as the aquifer provides vital irrigation for agriculture in the area. Fourth, it's shrinking, which raises concerns about the long-term sustainability of water resources. Lastly, it's an unconfined aquifer, meaning that it is not bounded by impermeable layers, allowing for easier extraction of water.

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  • 26. 

    Which of the following are steps used in clarifying drinking water?

    • A.

      Carbon filter

    • B.

      Chlorination

    • C.

      Let it stand and settle

    • D.

      Boiling

    • E.

      Reverse osmosis

    • F.

      Fluoride

    • G.

      Shaking

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Carbon filter
    B. Chlorination
    C. Let it stand and settle
    D. Boiling
    E. Reverse osmosis
    Explanation
    The steps used in clarifying drinking water include the use of a carbon filter to remove impurities, chlorination to kill bacteria and other microorganisms, letting the water stand and settle to allow any sediment to settle at the bottom, boiling the water to kill any remaining bacteria, and using reverse osmosis to remove additional contaminants. Fluoride is not mentioned as a step in clarifying drinking water, and shaking is not a recognized method for water clarification.

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  • 27. 

    What does the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) of 1974 do?

    • A.

      Make sure public drinking water is safe and frequently tested for contaminants

    • B.

      Make sure all drinking water has fluoride added

    • C.

      Make sure there aren't any fish in the pipes

    • D.

      Make it so everyone must have a filter on their kitchen sink

    Correct Answer
    A. Make sure public drinking water is safe and frequently tested for contaminants
    Explanation
    The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) of 1974 is a law that ensures the safety of public drinking water by implementing regulations and standards. It requires regular testing of drinking water to identify and monitor contaminants that may be present. This helps to protect the health and well-being of the public by ensuring that the water they consume is safe and free from harmful substances.

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  • 28. 

    What does MCL stand for?

    • A.

      Maximum contaminant levels

    • B.

      Maximilian Charles Legard

    • C.

      Meters of chlorinated levels

    • D.

      Mice, cheese, love

    Correct Answer
    A. Maximum contaminant levels
    Explanation
    MCL stands for Maximum Contaminant Levels. This term refers to the maximum allowable concentration of contaminants that are permitted in drinking water. These levels are set by regulatory agencies to ensure that the water is safe for consumption and to protect public health. Monitoring and maintaining MCLs is crucial in ensuring the quality and safety of drinking water.

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  • 29. 

    What contaminants are people looking for in drinking water?

    • A.

      Bacteria

    • B.

      Nitrates

    • C.

      Heavy metals

    • D.

      Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    • E.

      Radionuclioids

    • F.

      Sand

    • G.

      Oils

    • H.

      Xenon

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Bacteria
    B. Nitrates
    C. Heavy metals
    D. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
    E. Radionuclioids
    Explanation
    People are looking for various contaminants in drinking water to ensure its safety and quality. Bacteria can cause waterborne diseases and infections, while nitrates can be harmful to infants. Heavy metals like lead and mercury can have long-term health effects. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are toxic chemicals that can come from industrial pollution or pesticides. Radionuclides are radioactive substances that can pose a risk to human health. Therefore, testing for these contaminants is crucial in order to ensure that drinking water is free from harmful substances.

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  • 30. 

    What are a few water borne diseases?

    • A.

      Cholera

    • B.

      Typhoid

    • C.

      Yellow fever

    • D.

      Dysentery

    • E.

      Cancer

    • F.

      HIV/AIDS

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Cholera
    B. Typhoid
    C. Yellow fever
    D. Dysentery
    Explanation
    Cholera, typhoid, yellow fever, and dysentery are all examples of waterborne diseases. These diseases are caused by pathogens, such as bacteria or viruses, that are present in contaminated water sources. When individuals consume or come into contact with this contaminated water, they can become infected and develop symptoms ranging from mild to severe. Proper sanitation and access to clean drinking water are crucial in preventing the spread of these diseases.

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  • 31. 

    What are the steps in treating sewage water?

    • A.

      Intake

    • B.

      Filter out course bits

    • C.

      Microbes working to consume contaminants

    • D.

      Aerobic and anaerobic conditions to further the nitrogen cycle

    • E.

      Let sludge settle

    • F.

      Add proper chemicals

    • G.

      Get rid of phosphorus and chlorine

    • H.

      Put it into a river

    • I.

      Pump into deep underground

    • J.

      Read it a book

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Intake
    B. Filter out course bits
    C. Microbes working to consume contaminants
    D. Aerobic and anaerobic conditions to further the nitrogen cycle
    E. Let sludge settle
    F. Add proper chemicals
    G. Get rid of phosphorus and chlorine
    H. Put it into a river
    Explanation
    The steps in treating sewage water include intake, filtering out course bits, allowing microbes to consume contaminants, creating aerobic and anaerobic conditions to further the nitrogen cycle, letting sludge settle, adding proper chemicals, getting rid of phosphorus and chlorine, and finally, disposing of the treated water either by putting it into a river or pumping it into deep underground.

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  • 32. 

    It's impossible to fix a contaminated river or lake

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The statement that it is impossible to fix a contaminated river or lake is false. Contaminated rivers or lakes can be restored through various methods such as water treatment, implementing pollution control measures, and restoring natural habitats. These efforts can help improve water quality, remove pollutants, and restore the ecosystem of the contaminated water body. Therefore, it is possible to fix a contaminated river or lake with the right interventions and strategies.

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  • 33. 

    What is point source pollution?

    • A.

      Pollution that comes from a centralized location

    • B.

      Pollution that comes from many places

    • C.

      Pollution from something pointy, like a needle

    • D.

      Total ion in the water

    Correct Answer
    A. Pollution that comes from a centralized location
    Explanation
    Point source pollution refers to pollution that originates from a specific and identifiable source, such as a factory or a sewage treatment plant. It is characterized by the discharge of pollutants from a single location, making it easier to track and control. This type of pollution can include various contaminants, such as chemicals, heavy metals, or wastewater, that are released directly into the environment. Unlike non-point source pollution, which comes from diffuse and unidentifiable sources, point source pollution can be effectively managed and regulated through targeted measures and monitoring.

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  • 34. 

    What is non point source pollution?

    • A.

      Pollution that comes from many places

    • B.

      Pollution that comes from one specific place

    • C.

      Clean water that dilutes polluted water

    • D.

      Non existent

    Correct Answer
    A. Pollution that comes from many places
    Explanation
    Non-point source pollution refers to pollution that comes from multiple, diffuse sources rather than one specific location. This type of pollution is caused by runoff from rain or snowmelt that picks up pollutants from various sources such as agricultural fields, urban areas, and construction sites, and carries them into bodies of water. Unlike point source pollution, which comes from a single identifiable source like a factory or sewage treatment plant, non-point source pollution is more challenging to control and mitigate because it comes from numerous dispersed locations.

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  • 35. 

    What does conductivity measure?

    • A.

      Number of positive or negative ions in the water

    • B.

      Water clarity

    • C.

      How many heavy metals are in the water

    • D.

      How much electricity is in the water

    Correct Answer
    A. Number of positive or negative ions in the water
    Explanation
    Conductivity is a measure of the ability of a substance, in this case water, to conduct electric current. The presence of positive or negative ions in the water determines its conductivity. When ions are dissolved in water, they can carry electric charge and allow the flow of electricity. Therefore, the number of positive or negative ions in the water affects its conductivity.

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  • 36. 

    What does turbidity measure?

    • A.

      Water clarity

    • B.

      Water movement

    • C.

      Number of positive and negative ions in the water

    • D.

      Likelihood of a neutral pH

    Correct Answer
    A. Water clarity
    Explanation
    Turbidity measures water clarity. It refers to the amount of suspended particles or solids in the water, which can affect its transparency. Higher turbidity indicates cloudier or murkier water, while lower turbidity suggests clearer water with fewer particles. By measuring turbidity, one can assess the overall quality and health of the water, as well as its suitability for various purposes such as drinking, aquatic life, or recreational activities.

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  • 37. 

    How much more basic is a pH 7 than a pH 6?

    • A.

      10 times

    • B.

      6 times

    • C.

      20 times

    • D.

      1 unit

    Correct Answer
    A. 10 times
    Explanation
    A pH scale is used to measure the acidity or basicity of a substance. A pH of 7 is considered neutral, while a pH of 6 is slightly acidic. The difference between pH 7 and pH 6 is 1 unit. Since the pH scale is logarithmic, each unit represents a tenfold difference in acidity or basicity. Therefore, a pH 7 is 10 times more basic than a pH 6.

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  • 38. 

    What are some of the reasons for wetland habitat loss and degradation?

    • A.

      Drainage

    • B.

      Dredging and channeling

    • C.

      Diking and damming

    • D.

      Tilling for crop production

    • E.

      Logging

    • F.

      Mining

    • G.

      Construction

    • H.

      Changes to nutrient levels

    • I.

      Release of toxic chemicals

    • J.

      Introduction of nonnative species

    • K.

      Erosion

    • L.

      Sea level rise

    • M.

      Droughts

    • N.

      Storms

    • O.

      Environmental efforts

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Drainage
    B. Dredging and channeling
    C. Diking and damming
    D. Tilling for crop production
    E. Logging
    F. Mining
    G. Construction
    H. Changes to nutrient levels
    I. Release of toxic chemicals
    J. Introduction of nonnative species
    K. Erosion
    L. Sea level rise
    M. Droughts
    N. Storms
    Explanation
    The given answer lists various reasons for wetland habitat loss and degradation. These include activities such as drainage, dredging and channeling, diking and damming, tilling for crop production, logging, mining, and construction. Additionally, changes to nutrient levels, the release of toxic chemicals, the introduction of nonnative species, erosion, sea level rise, droughts, storms, and even environmental efforts can also contribute to wetland habitat loss and degradation.

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  • 39. 

    What are fines?

    • A.

      Particles smaller than sand

    • B.

      Diamond particles

    • C.

      Sand made from semi-precious stones

    • D.

      Holes in the ground where groundwater seeps through

    Correct Answer
    A. Particles smaller than sand
    Explanation
    Fines refer to particles that are smaller in size than sand. They are typically tiny fragments or particles that can be found in various materials such as soil, gravel, or construction aggregates. Fines can affect the properties and behavior of these materials, influencing factors such as compaction, permeability, and stability. The presence of fines can have significant implications in industries like construction and geotechnical engineering, where the understanding and management of particle size distribution are crucial.

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  • 40. 

    What is glacial till?

    • A.

      Rock debris that is transported by glaciers and then deposited

    • B.

      Grooves left in the ground from moving glaciers

    • C.

      The set time when a glacier will melt

    • D.

      Sand frozen into a glacier

    Correct Answer
    A. Rock debris that is transported by glaciers and then deposited
    Explanation
    Glacial till refers to rock debris that is picked up and transported by glaciers and then deposited as the glacier melts. As the glacier moves, it acts like a bulldozer, picking up rocks, boulders, and sediment along its path. When the glacier begins to melt, it drops this debris, creating a mixture of different-sized particles called glacial till. This process helps to shape the landscape and can leave behind characteristic landforms such as moraines and drumlins.

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  • 41. 

    What is the vadose zone (aka unsaturated zone)?

    • A.

      The moist area just above the saturated groundwater

    • B.

      A cone of depression

    • C.

      The area under an aquifer

    • D.

      Where Darth Vader lives

    Correct Answer
    A. The moist area just above the saturated groundwater
    Explanation
    The vadose zone, also known as the unsaturated zone, refers to the area just above the saturated groundwater. It is a region where the soil and rock contain both air and water, but the spaces between them are not fully saturated with water. This zone plays a crucial role in controlling the movement of water and contaminants through the soil, as well as providing a habitat for various organisms.

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  • 42. 

    What is the saturated zone?

    • A.

      The part of groundwater the is completely saturated

    • B.

      The area just above the groundwater

    • C.

      The part of the groundwater saturated with contaminants

    • D.

      The part of groundwater that only exists on Saturdays

    Correct Answer
    A. The part of groundwater the is completely saturated
    Explanation
    The saturated zone refers to the part of groundwater that is completely saturated. This means that all the pore spaces within the geological formation are filled with water. It is the area where the water table is located and where groundwater can be extracted through wells. This zone is important for water supply as it holds and transmits water, and it is also relevant for understanding groundwater flow and contamination.

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  • 43. 

    What is the groundwater table?

    • A.

      The top of the saturated zone

    • B.

      The bedrock on top of a confined aquifer

    • C.

      What the groundwater merpeople eat their meals off of

    • D.

      An upside down table on the ground in a puddle of water

    Correct Answer
    A. The top of the saturated zone
    Explanation
    The groundwater table refers to the top of the saturated zone, which is the level at which the ground is fully saturated with water. This means that below the groundwater table, all the pores and spaces in the soil or rock are filled with water. It is an important concept in hydrology as it determines the availability and movement of groundwater.

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  • 44. 

    What is an artesian spring?

    • A.

      A spring out of a confined aquifer, where the pressure forces the water out

    • B.

      A spring that, when the sun shines on it, makes rainbows

    • C.

      An old-fashioned spring

    • D.

      A spring coming out of an unconfined aquifer

    Correct Answer
    A. A spring out of a confined aquifer, where the pressure forces the water out
    Explanation
    An artesian spring is a type of spring that occurs when water from a confined aquifer is forced to the surface due to the pressure exerted on it. The water in the confined aquifer is trapped between layers of impermeable rock or clay, creating a high-pressure environment. When a pathway, such as a fracture or a well, is created in the confining layer, the water is released and flows upward, forming an artesian spring. This type of spring does not require a pump or external energy to bring the water to the surface, as the pressure within the aquifer naturally forces it out.

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  • 45. 

    What is auger drilling?

    • A.

      A drill drilling down to make a well

    • B.

      Drilling a well with high pressure air or water

    • C.

      Hammering out a well

    • D.

      Burning out a well

    Correct Answer
    A. A drill drilling down to make a well
    Explanation
    Auger drilling is a method used to create wells by drilling down into the ground. It involves the use of a drill that has a rotating helical screw blade, known as an auger, attached to it. As the drill rotates, the auger cuts into the ground, creating a hole. This process is commonly used in various industries, such as construction, mining, and geotechnical engineering, to create wells for various purposes, including extracting water, soil sampling, and installing foundations or piles.

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  • 46. 

    What is fluid drilling?

    • A.

      Drilling a well with high pressure air or water

    • B.

      Drilling a well with a drill

    • C.

      Hammering a well

    • D.

      Drilling for fluid of any kind

    Correct Answer
    A. Drilling a well with high pressure air or water
    Explanation
    Fluid drilling refers to the process of drilling a well using high pressure air or water. This technique involves using the force of pressurized fluid to create a borehole in the ground. The high pressure fluid is directed through the drill bit, which helps to break up the rock or soil and remove the cuttings from the hole. This method is commonly used in various industries, including oil and gas exploration, geothermal energy production, and water well drilling. By using high pressure air or water, fluid drilling allows for efficient and effective excavation of wells.

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  • 47. 

    What is percussion drilling?

    • A.

      Hammering out a well

    • B.

      Drilling out a well with a drill

    • C.

      Drilling out a well with high pressure air or water

    • D.

      Making a well by playing the drums really loudly

    Correct Answer
    A. Hammering out a well
    Explanation
    Percussion drilling refers to the process of hammering out a well. This technique involves repeatedly striking the ground with a heavy drill bit, causing it to break up the rock or soil and create a hole. The hammering action helps to penetrate hard surfaces and allows for the drilling of relatively shallow wells. This method is commonly used in areas with softer ground or when drilling through rock formations that are not easily penetrated by other drilling techniques.

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  • 48. 

    In a well, what is the drawdown?

    • A.

      The reduced groundwater level caused by pumping

    • B.

      The pipe going into the groundwater

    • C.

      The downward current in the groundwater caused by pumping

    • D.

      The force causing by the drill

    Correct Answer
    A. The reduced groundwater level caused by pumping
    Explanation
    The drawdown in a well refers to the reduced groundwater level caused by pumping. When water is extracted from a well, the water table is lowered, creating a cone-shaped depression around the well. This decrease in groundwater level is known as drawdown. It is an important concept in hydrogeology as it determines the amount of water that can be effectively pumped from a well and impacts the overall availability of groundwater resources.

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  • 49. 

    What are some examples of point source pollution?

    • A.

      Factories

    • B.

      Waste water treatment plans

    • C.

      Landfills

    • D.

      Abandoned mines

    • E.

      Fuel storage tanks

    • F.

      City streets

    • G.

      Golf courses

    • H.

      Farmland

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Factories
    B. Waste water treatment plans
    C. Landfills
    D. Abandoned mines
    E. Fuel storage tanks
    Explanation
    Point source pollution refers to the discharge of pollutants from a single identifiable source, such as factories, waste water treatment plans, landfills, abandoned mines, and fuel storage tanks. These sources release pollutants directly into the environment, which can contaminate water bodies, soil, and air. City streets, golf courses, and farmland can also contribute to point source pollution through the runoff of pollutants like chemicals, fertilizers, and pesticides.

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  • 50. 

    What are some examples on non point source pollution?

    • A.

      Lawns

    • B.

      Gardens

    • C.

      Golf courses

    • D.

      Farms

    • E.

      City streets

    • F.

      Construction

    • G.

      Stormwater runoff

    • H.

      Factories

    • I.

      Abandoned mines

    • J.

      Wastewater treatment plants

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Lawns
    B. Gardens
    C. Golf courses
    D. Farms
    E. City streets
    F. Construction
    G. Stormwater runoff
    Explanation
    Non point source pollution refers to pollution that comes from diffuse sources, rather than from a single point. In this case, lawns, gardens, golf courses, farms, city streets, construction sites, and stormwater runoff are all examples of non point source pollution. These sources can contribute to pollution through the use of fertilizers, pesticides, and other chemicals that can be carried away by rainwater or irrigation runoff. Additionally, urban areas and construction sites can generate pollutants such as sediment, oil, and debris that can be washed into water bodies during rainfall events.

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Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 21, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Nov 03, 2017
    Quiz Created by
    Kate09132014
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