Human Body: Leg, Knee, And Foot Anatomy Test

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Human Body: Leg, Knee, And Foot Anatomy Test - Quiz

Human Body is made up of as many as 700 muscles, even more. Studying the body is the concern of anatomy and physiology. Here, in this quiz, we are going to ask you questions about the anatomy of the lower human body parts. This test is about thirty-five questions strong, so, we suggest you keep a notepad ready, in case you want to take notes.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What is the area behind the knee for the neurovascular passage?

    Explanation
    The area behind the knee is known as the popliteal fossa. It is a shallow depression located at the back of the knee joint. This region is important as it serves as a neurovascular passage, meaning it contains important nerves and blood vessels that supply the lower leg and foot. The popliteal artery, popliteal vein, tibial nerve, and common fibular nerve all pass through this area. Understanding the anatomy of the popliteal fossa is crucial for medical professionals when performing procedures or diagnosing conditions related to the lower limb.

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  • 2. 

    What is the superomedial border of the popliteal fossa?

    Explanation
    The superomedial border of the popliteal fossa refers to the upper and inner border of the space behind the knee. The semimembranosus muscle is located in this area and forms part of the border. It is one of the three hamstring muscles and is responsible for flexing the knee joint and extending the hip joint.

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  • 3. 

    What is the superolateral border of the popliteal fossa?

    Explanation
    The correct answer is biceps femoris. The biceps femoris muscle forms the superolateral border of the popliteal fossa. The popliteal fossa is a diamond-shaped space located at the back of the knee joint. It is bounded by various muscles, tendons, and bones. The biceps femoris muscle is one of the hamstring muscles and it runs along the back of the thigh. It forms the lateral boundary of the popliteal fossa, along with other structures such as the semitendinosus muscle and the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle.

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  • 4. 

    What is the inferomedial border of the popliteal fossa?

    Explanation
    The inferomedial border of the popliteal fossa is formed by the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle. This muscle is located on the back of the lower leg and contributes to the formation of the popliteal fossa, which is a diamond-shaped space behind the knee. The medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle helps to define the boundaries of the popliteal fossa and plays a role in the movement and stability of the knee joint.

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  • 5. 

    What is the inferolateral border of the popliteal fossa?

    Explanation
    The inferolateral border of the popliteal fossa is formed by the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle. The popliteal fossa is a diamond-shaped space located at the back of the knee joint. It is bounded by various muscles and structures, and the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle forms one of its borders. This muscle is part of the calf muscles and contributes to the overall structure and function of the popliteal fossa.

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  • 6. 

    Which ligament originates from the malleolar fossa?

    Explanation
    The talofibular ligament originates from the malleolar fossa. The malleolar fossa is a depression on the lateral surface of the talus bone, which is located in the ankle joint. The talofibular ligament is one of the major ligaments that stabilize the ankle joint, connecting the talus bone to the fibula bone. It helps to prevent excessive inversion or inward rolling of the foot, providing stability to the joint during movements.

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  • 7. 

    What nerve supplies the anterior crural compartment?

    Explanation
    The deep peroneal nerve is responsible for supplying the anterior crural compartment. This nerve originates from the common peroneal nerve and travels down the front of the leg. It innervates the muscles in the anterior compartment, which are responsible for dorsiflexion of the foot and extension of the toes. The deep peroneal nerve also provides sensory innervation to the skin on the dorsal surface of the foot and the first web space between the big toe and the second toe.

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  • 8. 

    What muscle originates from the lateral surface of the tibia and inserts on the medial cuneiform bone and the first metatarsal? 

    Explanation
    The muscle that originates from the lateral surface of the tibia and inserts on the medial cuneiform bone and the first metatarsal is the tibialis anterior. This muscle is located in the front of the lower leg and is responsible for dorsiflexion of the foot, which means it helps to lift the foot upwards.

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  • 9. 

    Which muscle providing dorsiflexion for the foot inserts on the 2nd through 5th toes?

    Explanation
    The extensor digitorum longus is a muscle that is responsible for dorsiflexion of the foot. It inserts on the 2nd through 5th toes, meaning it attaches to these toes and allows for movement and extension of the toes. This muscle plays a crucial role in controlling the movement and stability of the foot during activities such as walking or running.

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  • 10. 

    Which muscle supplied by the deep peroneal nerve inserts at the base of the 5th metatarsal?

    Explanation
    The peroneus tertius muscle is supplied by the deep peroneal nerve and inserts at the base of the 5th metatarsal. This muscle is responsible for dorsiflexion and eversion of the foot.

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  • 11. 

    Which muscle originates from the fibula and inserts on the distal phalanx of the great toe?

    Explanation
    The extensor hallucis longus muscle originates from the fibula and inserts on the distal phalanx of the great toe. This muscle is responsible for extending (straightening) the big toe, allowing for movements such as pointing the toe upwards.

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  • 12. 

    What nerve innervates the muscle that originates on the fibula and inserts on the plantar surface of the medial cuneiform bone and the first metatarsal?

    Explanation
    muscle: peroneus longus

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  • 13. 

    Where does the muscle that is innervated by the superficial peroneal nerve and allows deep eversion insert?

    Explanation
    The muscle that is innervated by the superficial peroneal nerve and allows deep eversion is called the peroneus brevis muscle. This muscle originates from the lower two-thirds of the lateral surface of the fibula and inserts into the tuberosity of the 5th metatarsal.

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  • 14. 

    What nerve innervates the superficial and deep posterior crural compartments?

    Explanation
    The tibial nerve is responsible for innervating both the superficial and deep posterior crural compartments. It is a branch of the sciatic nerve and provides sensory and motor innervation to the muscles and skin in these compartments. The superficial posterior crural compartment contains muscles such as the gastrocnemius and soleus, while the deep posterior crural compartment contains muscles such as the tibialis posterior and flexor hallucis longus. The tibial nerve plays a crucial role in the proper functioning of these compartments by providing the necessary nerve supply.

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  • 15. 

    The triceps surae insert where?

    Explanation
    The triceps surae muscles, which consist of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, insert at the Achilles tendon. The Achilles tendon is a strong fibrous tissue that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone (calcaneus). This tendon is responsible for transmitting the force produced by the triceps surae muscles to the foot, allowing for plantarflexion of the ankle joint and the ability to push off the ground during activities such as walking, running, and jumping.

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  • 16. 

    Check the muscles that make up the triceps surae.

    • A.

      Plantaris

    • B.

      Lateral head of gastrocnemius

    • C.

      Tibialis posterior

    • D.

      Flexor digitorum longus

    • E.

      Medial head of gastrocnemius

    • F.

      Soleus

    • G.

      Peroneus tertius

    • H.

      Popliteus

    Correct Answer(s)
    B. Lateral head of gastrocnemius
    E. Medial head of gastrocnemius
    F. Soleus
    Explanation
    The correct answer includes the lateral head of gastrocnemius, medial head of gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles. These three muscles together make up the triceps surae, which is located in the calf region of the leg. The lateral and medial heads of gastrocnemius are the largest and most superficial muscles in the calf, while the soleus is a deeper muscle that lies underneath them. These muscles work together to allow for plantar flexion of the foot, which is the movement of pointing the toes downwards.

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  • 17. 

    What arteries supply the posterior compartments?

    Correct Answer(s)
    posterior tibial, peroneal
    Explanation
    The posterior compartments of the body are supplied by the posterior tibial and peroneal arteries. These arteries are responsible for delivering oxygenated blood to the muscles, tendons, and other structures located in the posterior compartments. The posterior tibial artery runs down the back of the leg and supplies blood to the calf muscles, while the peroneal artery is located on the outer side of the leg and provides blood to the lateral compartment. Together, these arteries ensure proper blood flow and nourishment to the posterior compartments.

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  • 18. 

    What artery supplies the anterior compartment?

    Correct Answer(s)
    anterior tibial
    Explanation
    The anterior tibial artery is responsible for supplying blood to the anterior compartment of the leg. This compartment includes muscles such as the tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus, and extensor digitorum longus. The anterior tibial artery arises from the popliteal artery behind the knee and descends down the leg, eventually becoming the dorsalis pedis artery on the dorsum of the foot. It provides oxygenated blood to the muscles and tissues in the anterior compartment, allowing for their proper function and movement.

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  • 19. 

    The lateral crural compartment has a single main artery.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Supplied via perforators of anterior tibial and peroneal arteries

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  • 20. 

    Which muscle is also called the "freshman nerve"?

    Correct Answer
    plantaris
    Explanation
    small belly, long tendon

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  • 21. 

    Which muscle inserts on the navicular tuberosity?

    Correct Answer
    tibialis posterior
    Explanation
    The tibialis posterior muscle inserts on the navicular tuberosity. This means that the muscle attaches to the navicular tuberosity, which is a bony prominence on the navicular bone. The tibialis posterior muscle is located in the posterior compartment of the leg and plays a role in foot inversion and plantar flexion.

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  • 22. 

    Which muscle of the deep posterior crural compartment is the only that isn't a plantar flexor?

    Correct Answer
    popliteus
    Explanation
    The popliteus muscle is the only muscle in the deep posterior crural compartment that is not involved in plantar flexion. It is a small muscle located behind the knee joint and plays a crucial role in unlocking the knee joint by internally rotating the tibia. While the other muscles in the deep posterior crural compartment, such as the flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, and tibialis posterior, are responsible for plantar flexion of the foot, the popliteus muscle has a different function.

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  • 23. 

    What is the eponym for the transverse tarsal joint? 

    Correct Answer
    Chopart's joint
    Explanation
    Chopart's joint is the eponym for the transverse tarsal joint. This joint is located in the foot and connects the midfoot to the hindfoot. It is named after François Chopart, a French surgeon who first described the joint and its function. The transverse tarsal joint allows for a combination of inversion, eversion, and rotation movements, contributing to the flexibility and stability of the foot during walking and other activities.

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  • 24. 

    What is the eponym for the tarsal-metatarsal joint? 

    Correct Answer
    LisFranc's joint
    Explanation
    LisFranc's joint is the eponym for the tarsal-metatarsal joint. This joint is located in the midfoot, specifically between the tarsal bones and the metatarsal bones. It is named after Jacques Lisfranc de St. Martin, a French surgeon who first described this joint and its associated injuries.

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  • 25. 

    What is the only tarsal bone that articulates with the leg bones?

    Correct Answer
    talus
    Explanation
    The talus is the only tarsal bone that articulates with the leg bones. It is located at the top of the foot, between the tibia and fibula of the leg. The talus plays a crucial role in allowing movement between the foot and the leg, forming a joint called the ankle joint. Its unique shape and structure enable it to transmit weight from the leg to the foot while providing stability and flexibility in walking and other activities.

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  • 26. 

    Which tendon articulates with the calcaneus?

    Correct Answer
    flexor hallucis longus
    Explanation
    The flexor hallucis longus tendon articulates with the calcaneus. This means that it attaches to and moves the calcaneus bone. The flexor hallucis longus is a muscle located in the lower leg and is responsible for flexing the big toe. Its tendon runs along the inside of the ankle and inserts into the base of the distal phalanx of the big toe. By attaching to the calcaneus, the flexor hallucis longus tendon helps to control the movement of the foot and toes.

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  • 27. 

    Which structures support the medial longitudinal arch?

    • A.

      Plantar aponeurosis

    • B.

      Intrinsic pedal muscles

    • C.

      Anterior tibiotalar ligament

    • D.

      Long plantar ligament

    • E.

      Tibiocalcaneal ligament

    • F.

      Posterior tibiotalar ligament

    • G.

      Short plantar ligament

    • H.

      Tibionavicular ligament

    • I.

      Spring ligament

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Plantar aponeurosis
    B. Intrinsic pedal muscles
    D. Long plantar ligament
    G. Short plantar ligament
    I. Spring ligament
    Explanation
    The structures that support the medial longitudinal arch are the plantar aponeurosis, intrinsic pedal muscles, long plantar ligament, short plantar ligament, and spring ligament. These structures work together to provide stability and maintain the shape of the arch during weight-bearing activities. The plantar aponeurosis is a thick band of connective tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot and helps to support the arch. The intrinsic pedal muscles, including the flexor hallucis brevis and flexor digitorum brevis, also play a role in supporting the arch. The long plantar ligament and short plantar ligament provide additional support by connecting the bones of the foot. Finally, the spring ligament, also known as the plantar calcaneonavicular ligament, supports the arch by connecting the calcaneus (heel bone) to the navicular bone.

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  • 28. 

    What is the most frequently torn ligament in the body?

    Correct Answer(s)
    anterior talofibular ligament
    Explanation
    The anterior talofibular ligament is the most frequently torn ligament in the body. This ligament is located in the ankle and is responsible for stabilizing the joint. It is commonly injured during activities that involve sudden twisting or rolling of the ankle, such as sports or accidents. The tear in this ligament can result in pain, swelling, and instability of the ankle joint. Prompt medical attention and appropriate treatment are necessary to ensure proper healing and prevent long-term complications.

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  • 29. 

    What nerve innervates the muscle that attaches to the 1st metatarsal tuberosity?

    Correct Answer(s)
    superficial peroneal nerve
    Explanation
    peroneus longus

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  • 30. 

    What nerve innervates the muscle that attaches to the 5th metatarsal tuberosity?

    Correct Answer(s)
    superficial peroneal nerve
    Explanation
    peroneus brevis

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  • 31. 

    Which muscles are tendons of the tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus, extensor digitorum longus, and peroneus Tertius?

    Correct Answer(s)
    extensor digitorum brevis, extensor hallucis brevis
    Explanation
    The tendons of the tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus, extensor digitorum longus, and peroneus tertius muscles are the extensor digitorum brevis and extensor hallucis brevis.

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  • 32. 

    Which muscles originate from the flexor digitorum longus tendon?

    Correct Answer(s)
    lumbrical muscles
    Explanation
    The lumbrical muscles originate from the flexor digitorum longus tendon. These muscles are located in the foot and are responsible for flexing the toes at the metatarsophalangeal joints.

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  • 33. 

    The neurovascular plane is between the 2nd and 3rd layers of the foot. 

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    1st and 2nd

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  • 34. 

    What is the axis of function for the foot?

    Correct Answer
    2nd toe
    Explanation
    The axis of function for the foot refers to the line or point around which the foot moves or pivots. In this case, the 2nd toe is identified as the axis of function for the foot. This means that when the foot is in motion, it primarily pivots or rotates around the 2nd toe.

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  • 35. 

    What is the acronym for medial plantar nerve innervation?

    Correct Answer
    F2LAb
    Explanation
    Flexor hallucis brevis, flexor digitorum brevis, 1st lumbrical, abductor hallucis.

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