IBPS PO Exam 2015: English Language

40 Questions | Total Attempts: 1859

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English Language Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Rearrange the following six sentences A, B, C, D, E and F in the proper sequence to form the meaningful sentence and then answer the questions given below.a) Today, the earth has many satellites besides the moon.b) As a result, they travel in an orbit round the earthc) But the pull of the earth keeps them from doing so.d) They are the artificial satellites made by the man and very much smaller than the moon.e) The artificial satellites do not fall because they are going too fast to do so.f) As they speed along they tend to go straight off into spaceWhich of the following should be last sentence after rearrangement?
    • A. 

      A)

    • B. 

      B)

    • C. 

      C)

    • D. 

      D)

    • E. 

      E)

  • 2. 
    Rearrange the following six sentences A, B, C, D, E and F in the proper sequence to form the meaningful sentence and then answer the questions given below.a) Today, the earth has many satellites besides the moon.b) As a result, they travel in an orbit round the earthc) But the pull of the earth keeps them from doing so.d) They are the artificial satellites made by the man and very much smaller than the moon.e) The artificial satellites do not fall because they are going too fast to do so.f) As they speed along they tend to go straight off into spaceWhich of the following should be third sentence after rearrangement?
    • A. 

      A)

    • B. 

      B)

    • C. 

      C)

    • D. 

      D)

    • E. 

      E)

  • 3. 
    Rearrange the following six sentences A, B, C, D, E and F in the proper sequence to form the meaningful sentence and then answer the questions given below.a) Today, the earth has many satellites besides the moon.b) As a result, they travel in an orbit round the earthc) But the pull of the earth keeps them from doing so.d) They are the artificial satellites made by the man and very much smaller than the moon.e) The artificial satellites do not fall because they are going too fast to do so.f) As they speed along they tend to go straight off into spaceWhich of the following should be fifth sentence after rearrangement?
    • A. 

      A)

    • B. 

      B)

    • C. 

      D)

    • D. 

      E)

    • E. 

      F)

  • 4. 
    Rearrange the following six sentences A, B, C, D, E and F in the proper sequence to form the meaningful sentence and then answer the questions given below.a) Today, the earth has many satellites besides the moon.b) As a result, they travel in an orbit round the earthc) But the pull of the earth keeps them from doing so.d) They are the artificial satellites made by the man and very much smaller than the moon.e) The artificial satellites do not fall because they are going too fast to do so.f) As they speed along they tend to go straight off into spaceWhich of the following should be fourth sentence after rearrangement?
    • A. 

      A)

    • B. 

      B)

    • C. 

      C)

    • D. 

      D)

    • E. 

      E)

  • 5. 
    Rearrange the following six sentences A, B, C, D, E and F in the proper sequence to form the meaningful sentence and then answer the questions given below.a) Today, the earth has many satellites besides the moon.b) As a result, they travel in an orbit round the earthc) But the pull of the earth keeps them from doing so.d) They are the artificial satellites made by the man and very much smaller than the moon.e) The artificial satellites do not fall because they are going too fast to do so.f) As they speed along they tend to go straight off into spaceWhich of the following should be second sentence after rearrangement?
    • A. 

      A)

    • B. 

      B)

    • C. 

      C)

    • D. 

      D)

    • E. 

      E)

  • 6. 
    Question: The following questions consist of a single sentence with one blank only. You are given six words denoted by A, B, C, D, E & F as answer choices and. You have to pick correct which will make the sentence meaningfully complete.We must prevent endangered wild species from becoming ………………..in order that our future generation may…………… the great diversity of animal life.
    • A. 

      Rare, escape

    • B. 

      Outdated, know

    • C. 

      Volatile, notice

    • D. 

      Powerful, protect

    • E. 

      Extinct, enjoy

  • 7. 
    Question: The following questions consist of a single sentence with one blank only. You are given six words denoted by A, B, C, D, E & F as answer choices and. You have to pick correct which will make the sentence meaningfully complete.India’s immense physical size as also the fact of its …………….society ……………………any attempt towards a neat capsuled presentation on any subject.
    • A. 

      Cultured, demonstrates

    • B. 

      Pluralistic, defies

    • C. 

      Multi-religious, fails

    • D. 

      Amorphous, challenges

    • E. 

      Variegated, frustrates

  • 8. 
    Question: The following questions consist of a single sentence with one blank only. You are given six words denoted by A, B, C, D, E & F as answer choices and. You have to pick correct which will make the sentence meaningfully complete.The secretary ………………………. the society’s fund, ……………………he was dismissed.
    • A. 

      Misplaced, soon

    • B. 

      Robbed, thus

    • C. 

      Pirated, therefore

    • D. 

      Misappropriated, so

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 9. 
    Question: The following questions consist of a single sentence with one blank only. You are given six words denoted by A, B, C, D, E & F as answer choices and. You have to pick correct which will make the sentence meaningfully complete.There are attempts being made to try to………………….languages through specific ………………………, but the result is that some tongues become conserved as if they were a museum piece.
    • A. 

      Question: The following questions consist of a single sentence with one blank only. You are given six words denoted by A, B, C, D, E & F as answer choices and. You have to pick correct which will make the sentence meaningfully complete. Save, ways

    • B. 

      Conserve, factors

    • C. 

      Preserve, measures

    • D. 

      Protect, tricks

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 10. 
    Question: The following questions consist of a single sentence with one blank only. You are given six words denoted by A, B, C, D, E & F as answer choices and. You have to pick correct which will make the sentence meaningfully complete.Cholesterol has long being identified as a silent killer because the patient has no ……..of the danger freely ………………his system.
    • A. 

      Idea, infecting

    • B. 

      Thought, attacking

    • C. 

      Notion, ravishing

    • D. 

      Information, invading

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 11. 
    • A. 

      People above seventy five

    • B. 

      Years of age

    • C. 

      Are not allowed to travel

    • D. 

      By air

    • E. 

      No Error

  • 12. 
    Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. There Is 'No error'. The answer is ‘E’. (Ignore errors of punctuation, any).She counted the books/to make sure that/none of them/were missing/No Errors
    • A. 

      She counted the books

    • B. 

      To make sure that

    • C. 

      None of them

    • D. 

      Were missing

    • E. 

      No Errors

  • 13. 
    Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. There Is 'No error'. The answer is ‘E’. (Ignore errors of punctuation, any).To make him succeed/the correct thing to do/is to punish/until he does not try/No Error
    • A. 

      To make him succeed

    • B. 

      The correct thing to do

    • C. 

      Is to punish

    • D. 

      Until he does not try

    • E. 

      No Error

  • 14. 
    Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. There Is 'No error'. The answer is ‘E’. (Ignore errors of punctuation, any).It being a holiday/every student wanted/ to leave/ for their hometown/ No Error
    • A. 

      It being a holiday

    • B. 

      Every student wanted

    • C. 

      To leave

    • D. 

      For their hometown

    • E. 

      No Error

  • 15. 
    Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error or idiomatic error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number of that part is the answer. There Is 'No error'. The answer is ‘E’. (Ignore errors of punctuation, any).The invigilator asked him/that why he had/ not brought/ his call letter/ No Error
    • A. 

      The invigilator asked him

    • B. 

      That why he had

    • C. 

      Not brought

    • D. 

      His call letter

    • E. 

      No Error

  • 16. 
    Which of the phrases A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the word phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (E) as the answer.The increased time devoting to watch television is one of the important cases of decline in reading ability.
    • A. 

      Devoted for watch

    • B. 

      Devoted to watching

    • C. 

      Devoted for the watch of the

    • D. 

      Devoted to keep watch

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 17. 
    Which of the phrases A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the word phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (E) as the answer.Walking has distinctly advantageous over driving as you see many things while walking that you often miss while driving.
    • A. 

      Have advantages distinctly

    • B. 

      Is distinctly advantages

    • C. 

      Has distinct advantages

    • D. 

      Is distinct in advantageous

    • E. 

      No Correction Required

  • 18. 
    Which of the phrases A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the word phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (E) as the answer.He turned down our proposal which, we had prepared by so much dedication.
    • A. 

      Had prepared with

    • B. 

      Have prepared by

    • C. 

      Were prepared with

    • D. 

      Have been preparing for

    • E. 

      No Correction Required

  • 19. 
    Which of the phrases A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the word phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (E) as the answer.Although family TV Serials do vary, they have certain common element.
    • A. 

      Do not vary

    • B. 

      Seldom vary

    • C. 

      Rarely vary

    • D. 

      Are varying

    • E. 

      No Correction required

  • 20. 
    Which of the phrases A), (B), (C) and (D) given below each sentence should replace the word phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is given and no correction is required, mark (E) as the answer.We have profound faith and hopes for the future.
    • A. 

      Faith for also hopes for

    • B. 

      Faith in and hopes for

    • C. 

      Faith and hopes for

    • D. 

      Faith about and hopes in

    • E. 

      No Correction Required

  • 21. 
    In the following passage, there are blank, each of which has been numbered find appropriate word from the option given below in each case.First aid expert stress that ……26………. What to do for an …………….27………….victim until a doctor or other trained person gets to the accident scene can………….28…………… a life, especially in case of stoppage of breathing, severe bleeding and shocking.People with special ………..29…………problems, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, epilepsy, or allergy, are ………………...30……………to wear some sort of emblem identifying the problem as a safeguard against administration of medication that might be injurious or even…………31…………… When emergencies do occur ……………..32…………first aid within minutes often ………….33…………….life of death.………34……….. adminstaring of first aid  and………………35……………….medical professionals to provide better care.
    • A. 

      Before

    • B. 

      Attempting

    • C. 

      Regarding

    • D. 

      Knowing

    • E. 

      About

  • 22. 
    In the following passage, there are blank, each of which has been numbered find appropriate word from the option given below in each case.First aid expert stress that ……26………. What to do for an …………….27………….victim until a doctor or other trained person gets to the accident scene can………….28…………… a life, especially in case of stoppage of breathing, severe bleeding and shocking.People with special ………..29…………problems, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, epilepsy, or allergy, are ………………...30……………to wear some sort of emblem identifying the problem as a safeguard against administration of medication that might be injurious or even…………31…………… When emergencies do occur ……………..32…………first aid within minutes often ………….33…………….life of death.………34……….. adminstaring of first aid  and………………35……………….medical professionals to provide better care.
    • A. 

      Injured

    • B. 

      Inquiring

    • C. 

      Efficient

    • D. 

      Important

    • E. 

      Accident

  • 23. 
    In the following passage, there are blank, each of which has been numbered find appropriate word from the option given below in each case.First aid expert stress that ……26………. What to do for an …………….27………….victim until a doctor or other trained person gets to the accident scene can………….28…………… a life, especially in case of stoppage of breathing, severe bleeding and shocking.People with special ………..29…………problems, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, epilepsy, or allergy, are ………………...30……………to wear some sort of emblem identifying the problem as a safeguard against administration of medication that might be injurious or even…………31…………… When emergencies do occur ……………..32…………first aid within minutes often ………….33…………….life of death.………34……….. adminstaring of first aid  and………………35……………….medical professionals to provide better care.
    • A. 

      Harm

    • B. 

      Comfort

    • C. 

      Take

    • D. 

      Soothe

    • E. 

      Save

  • 24. 
    In the following passage, there are blank, each of which has been numbered find appropriate word from the option given below in each case.First aid expert stress that ……26………. What to do for an …………….27………….victim until a doctor or other trained person gets to the accident scene can………….28…………… a life, especially in case of stoppage of breathing, severe bleeding and shocking.People with special ………..29…………problems, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, epilepsy, or allergy, are ………………...30……………to wear some sort of emblem identifying the problem as a safeguard against administration of medication that might be injurious or even…………31…………… When emergencies do occur ……………..32…………first aid within minutes often ………….33…………….life of death.………34……….. adminstaring of first aid  and………………35……………….medical professionals to provide better care.
    • A. 

      Mental

    • B. 

      Ethical

    • C. 

      Medical

    • D. 

      Accident

    • E. 

      Moral

  • 25. 
    In the following passage, there are blank, each of which has been numbered find appropriate word from the option given below in each case.First aid expert stress that ……26………. What to do for an …………….27………….victim until a doctor or other trained person gets to the accident scene can………….28…………… a life, especially in case of stoppage of breathing, severe bleeding and shocking.People with special ………..29…………problems, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, epilepsy, or allergy, are ………………...30……………to wear some sort of emblem identifying the problem as a safeguard against administration of medication that might be injurious or even…………31…………… When emergencies do occur ……………..32…………first aid within minutes often ………….33…………….life of death.………34……….. adminstaring of first aid  and………………35……………….medical professionals to provide better care.
    • A. 

      Prohibited

    • B. 

      Invited

    • C. 

      Compelled

    • D. 

      Allowed

    • E. 

      Urged

  • 26. 
    In the following passage, there are blank, each of which has been numbered find appropriate word from the option given below in each case.First aid expert stress that ……26………. What to do for an …………….27………….victim until a doctor or other trained person gets to the accident scene can………….28…………… a life, especially in case of stoppage of breathing, severe bleeding and shocking.People with special ………..29…………problems, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, epilepsy, or allergy, are ………………...30……………to wear some sort of emblem identifying the problem as a safeguard against administration of medication that might be injurious or even…………31…………… When emergencies do occur ……………..32…………first aid within minutes often ………….33…………….life of death.………34……….. adminstaring of first aid  and………………35……………….medical professionals to provide better care.
    • A. 

      Appropriate

    • B. 

      Dangerous

    • C. 

      Beneficial

    • D. 

      Fatal

    • E. 

      Remedial

  • 27. 
    In the following passage, there are blank, each of which has been numbered find appropriate word from the option given below in each case.First aid expert stress that ……26………. What to do for an …………….27………….victim until a doctor or other trained person gets to the accident scene can………….28…………… a life, especially in case of stoppage of breathing, severe bleeding and shocking.People with special ………..29…………problems, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, epilepsy, or allergy, are ………………...30……………to wear some sort of emblem identifying the problem as a safeguard against administration of medication that might be injurious or even…………31…………… When emergencies do occur ……………..32…………first aid within minutes often ………….33…………….life of death.………34……….. adminstaring of first aid  and………………35……………….medical professionals to provide better care.
    • A. 

      Expecting

    • B. 

      Providing

    • C. 

      Avoiding

    • D. 

      Ignoring

    • E. 

      Neglecting

  • 28. 
    In the following passage, there are blank, each of which has been numbered find appropriate word from the option given below in each case.First aid expert stress that ……26………. What to do for an …………….27………….victim until a doctor or other trained person gets to the accident scene can………….28…………… a life, especially in case of stoppage of breathing, severe bleeding and shocking.People with special ………..29…………problems, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, epilepsy, or allergy, are ………………...30……………to wear some sort of emblem identifying the problem as a safeguard against administration of medication that might be injurious or even…………31…………… When emergencies do occur ……………..32…………first aid within minutes often ………….33…………….life of death.………34……….. adminstaring of first aid  and………………35……………….medical professionals to provide better care.
    • A. 

      Determines

    • B. 

      Offers

    • C. 

      Vanishes

    • D. 

      Reflects

    • E. 

      Begs

  • 29. 
    In the following passage, there are blank, each of which has been numbered find appropriate word from the option given below in each case.First aid expert stress that ……26………. What to do for an …………….27………….victim until a doctor or other trained person gets to the accident scene can………….28…………… a life, especially in case of stoppage of breathing, severe bleeding and shocking.People with special ………..29…………problems, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, epilepsy, or allergy, are ………………...30……………to wear some sort of emblem identifying the problem as a safeguard against administration of medication that might be injurious or even…………31…………… When emergencies do occur ……………..32…………first aid within minutes often ………….33…………….life of death.………34……….. adminstaring of first aid  and………………35……………….medical professionals to provide better care.
    • A. 

      Hasty

    • B. 

      Careless

    • C. 

      Proper

    • D. 

      Probable

    • E. 

      Reasonably

  • 30. 
    In the following passage, there are blank, each of which has been numbered find appropriate word from the option given below in each case.First aid expert stress that ……26………. What to do for an …………….27………….victim until a doctor or other trained person gets to the accident scene can………….28…………… a life, especially in case of stoppage of breathing, severe bleeding and shocking.People with special ………..29…………problems, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, epilepsy, or allergy, are ………………...30……………to wear some sort of emblem identifying the problem as a safeguard against administration of medication that might be injurious or even…………31…………… When emergencies do occur ……………..32…………first aid within minutes often ………….33…………….life of death.………34……….. adminstaring of first aid  and………………35……………….medical professionals to provide better care.
    • A. 

      Resist

    • B. 

      Instigates

    • C. 

      Hinder

    • D. 

      Prevents

    • E. 

      Enable

  • 31. 
    Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.The education system is breeding more and more frustration among both students and teachers. And yet no one seems too clear about what can be done to make it more meaningful. Many reforms have been discussed at length but have come to nothing for one reason or another. The authorities are now peddling the idea of autono- mous colleges as a means of toning up teaching standards. They argue that by allowing certain colleges to introduce their own courses, to hold seminars, and above all, to evolve their own method of assessing students, students will get a far better deal. Indeed they made out that such colleges will have a free hand in nearly everything except granting degrees. In theory, all this sounds attractive enough. But there is little to show that the managements concerned are keen on such reforms. Even today, nothing prevents a college from inviting guest speakers on specialised subjects or holding courses in English for vernacular students. But not a single one of those who are now clamouring for autonomy has bothered to do so. It is no secret that colleges which may be 'freed' to an extent from university control are highly elitist. In Bombay, for example, there is a big cultural gulf between city colleges and suburban colleges. If some of the former are now given a degree of autonomy, it will only heighten this disparity.The answer to the vexed problem of declining standards in higher education does not lie in encouraging the growth of 'model' institutions but in improving overall standards. This is of course easier said than done, since more young people are seeking degrees. The only solution, however unpalatable it may sound, is to drastically reduce the number of those who are admitted to colleges. Even though there is political pressure on many State Governments to build new colleges and to reserve more seats for backward classes, it will be sheer folly to expand such facilities recklessly without giving any thought to the quality of education imparted. If admissions are made far more selective, it will automatically reduce the number of entrants. This should apply particularly to new colleges, many of which are little more than degree factories. Only then can the authorities hope to bring down the teacher-student ratio to manageable proportions. What is more, teachers should be given refresher courses every summer vacation to brush up their knowledge. Besides, if college managements increase the library budget it will help both the staff and the students a great deal. At the same time, however, it will be unfair to deny college education to thousands of young men and women unless employers stop insisting on degrees even for clerical jobs. For a start, why can't the Government disqualify graduates from securing certain jobs-say Class III and Class IV posts? Once the link between degrees and jobs is severed at least in some important departments, it will make young people think twice before joining college.The author’s attitude in the comprehension passage is
    • A. 

      Cynical

    • B. 

      Optimistic

    • C. 

      Critical

    • D. 

      Conservative

    • E. 

      Constructive

  • 32. 
    Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.The education system is breeding more and more frustration among both students and teachers. And yet no one seems too clear about what can be done to make it more meaningful. Many reforms have been discussed at length but have come to nothing for one reason or another. The authorities are now peddling the idea of autono- mous colleges as a means of toning up teaching standards. They argue that by allowing certain colleges to introduce their own courses, to hold seminars, and above all, to evolve their own method of assessing students, students will get a far better deal. Indeed they made out that such colleges will have a free hand in nearly everything except granting degrees. In theory, all this sounds attractive enough. But there is little to show that the managements concerned are keen on such reforms. Even today, nothing prevents a college from inviting guest speakers on specialised subjects or holding courses in English for vernacular students. But not a single one of those who are now clamouring for autonomy has bothered to do so. It is no secret that colleges which may be 'freed' to an extent from university control are highly elitist. In Bombay, for example, there is a big cultural gulf between city colleges and suburban colleges. If some of the former are now given a degree of autonomy, it will only heighten this disparity.The answer to the vexed problem of declining standards in higher education does not lie in encouraging the growth of 'model' institutions but in improving overall standards. This is of course easier said than done, since more young people are seeking degrees. The only solution, however unpalatable it may sound, is to drastically reduce the number of those who are admitted to colleges. Even though there is political pressure on many State Governments to build new colleges and to reserve more seats for backward classes, it will be sheer folly to expand such facilities recklessly without giving any thought to the quality of education imparted. If admissions are made far more selective, it will automatically reduce the number of entrants. This should apply particularly to new colleges, many of which are little more than degree factories. Only then can the authorities hope to bring down the teacher-student ratio to manageable proportions. What is more, teachers should be given refresher courses every summer vacation to brush up their knowledge. Besides, if college managements increase the library budget it will help both the staff and the students a great deal. At the same time, however, it will be unfair to deny college education to thousands of young men and women unless employers stop insisting on degrees even for clerical jobs. For a start, why can't the Government disqualify graduates from securing certain jobs-say Class III and Class IV posts? Once the link between degrees and jobs is severed at least in some important departments, it will make young people think twice before joining college.Which of the following is the most significant feature of the scheme of autonomous colleges, according to the passage?
    • A. 

      They can introduce new courses

    • B. 

      They can hold seminars

    • C. 

      They can evolve their methods of assessment

    • D. 

      They can award degrees

    • E. 

      They can make admissions without restrictions

  • 33. 
    Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.The education system is breeding more and more frustration among both students and teachers. And yet no one seems too clear about what can be done to make it more meaningful. Many reforms have been discussed at length but have come to nothing for one reason or another. The authorities are now peddling the idea of autono- mous colleges as a means of toning up teaching standards. They argue that by allowing certain colleges to introduce their own courses, to hold seminars, and above all, to evolve their own method of assessing students, students will get a far better deal. Indeed they made out that such colleges will have a free hand in nearly everything except granting degrees. In theory, all this sounds attractive enough. But there is little to show that the managements concerned are keen on such reforms. Even today, nothing prevents a college from inviting guest speakers on specialised subjects or holding courses in English for vernacular students. But not a single one of those who are now clamouring for autonomy has bothered to do so. It is no secret that colleges which may be 'freed' to an extent from university control are highly elitist. In Bombay, for example, there is a big cultural gulf between city colleges and suburban colleges. If some of the former are now given a degree of autonomy, it will only heighten this disparity.The answer to the vexed problem of declining standards in higher education does not lie in encouraging the growth of 'model' institutions but in improving overall standards. This is of course easier said than done, since more young people are seeking degrees. The only solution, however unpalatable it may sound, is to drastically reduce the number of those who are admitted to colleges. Even though there is political pressure on many State Governments to build new colleges and to reserve more seats for backward classes, it will be sheer folly to expand such facilities recklessly without giving any thought to the quality of education imparted. If admissions are made far more selective, it will automatically reduce the number of entrants. This should apply particularly to new colleges, many of which are little more than degree factories. Only then can the authorities hope to bring down the teacher-student ratio to manageable proportions. What is more, teachers should be given refresher courses every summer vacation to brush up their knowledge. Besides, if college managements increase the library budget it will help both the staff and the students a great deal. At the same time, however, it will be unfair to deny college education to thousands of young men and women unless employers stop insisting on degrees even for clerical jobs. For a start, why can't the Government disqualify graduates from securing certain jobs-say Class III and Class IV posts? Once the link between degrees and jobs is severed at least in some important departments, it will make young people think twice before joining college.The author does believe that
    • A. 

      Colleges have the capacity to develop courses

    • B. 

      Colleges have expertise for assessment

    • C. 

      Some colleges are only degree factories

    • D. 

      College managements are really keen on reforms

    • E. 

      Some colleges are elitist

  • 34. 
    Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.The education system is breeding more and more frustration among both students and teachers. And yet no one seems too clear about what can be done to make it more meaningful. Many reforms have been discussed at length but have come to nothing for one reason or another. The authorities are now peddling the idea of autono- mous colleges as a means of toning up teaching standards. They argue that by allowing certain colleges to introduce their own courses, to hold seminars, and above all, to evolve their own method of assessing students, students will get a far better deal. Indeed they made out that such colleges will have a free hand in nearly everything except granting degrees. In theory, all this sounds attractive enough. But there is little to show that the managements concerned are keen on such reforms. Even today, nothing prevents a college from inviting guest speakers on specialised subjects or holding courses in English for vernacular students. But not a single one of those who are now clamouring for autonomy has bothered to do so. It is no secret that colleges which may be 'freed' to an extent from university control are highly elitist. In Bombay, for example, there is a big cultural gulf between city colleges and suburban colleges. If some of the former are now given a degree of autonomy, it will only heighten this disparity.The answer to the vexed problem of declining standards in higher education does not lie in encouraging the growth of 'model' institutions but in improving overall standards. This is of course easier said than done, since more young people are seeking degrees. The only solution, however unpalatable it may sound, is to drastically reduce the number of those who are admitted to colleges. Even though there is political pressure on many State Governments to build new colleges and to reserve more seats for backward classes, it will be sheer folly to expand such facilities recklessly without giving any thought to the quality of education imparted. If admissions are made far more selective, it will automatically reduce the number of entrants. This should apply particularly to new colleges, many of which are little more than degree factories. Only then can the authorities hope to bring down the teacher-student ratio to manageable proportions. What is more, teachers should be given refresher courses every summer vacation to brush up their knowledge. Besides, if college managements increase the library budget it will help both the staff and the students a great deal. At the same time, however, it will be unfair to deny college education to thousands of young men and women unless employers stop insisting on degrees even for clerical jobs. For a start, why can't the Government disqualify graduates from securing certain jobs-say Class III and Class IV posts? Once the link between degrees and jobs is severed at least in some important departments, it will make young people think twice before joining college.What, according to the passage, would be the result of granting autonomy to some colleges?
    • A. 

      The teacher student ratio will come down

    • B. 

      Disparity and sub-urban college will increase

    • C. 

      Colleges will multiply

    • D. 

      Some colleges will start selling degrees

    • E. 

      All of these

  • 35. 
    Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.The education system is breeding more and more frustration among both students and teachers. And yet no one seems too clear about what can be done to make it more meaningful. Many reforms have been discussed at length but have come to nothing for one reason or another. The authorities are now peddling the idea of autono- mous colleges as a means of toning up teaching standards. They argue that by allowing certain colleges to introduce their own courses, to hold seminars, and above all, to evolve their own method of assessing students, students will get a far better deal. Indeed they made out that such colleges will have a free hand in nearly everything except granting degrees. In theory, all this sounds attractive enough. But there is little to show that the managements concerned are keen on such reforms. Even today, nothing prevents a college from inviting guest speakers on specialised subjects or holding courses in English for vernacular students. But not a single one of those who are now clamouring for autonomy has bothered to do so. It is no secret that colleges which may be 'freed' to an extent from university control are highly elitist. In Bombay, for example, there is a big cultural gulf between city colleges and suburban colleges. If some of the former are now given a degree of autonomy, it will only heighten this disparity.The answer to the vexed problem of declining standards in higher education does not lie in encouraging the growth of 'model' institutions but in improving overall standards. This is of course easier said than done, since more young people are seeking degrees. The only solution, however unpalatable it may sound, is to drastically reduce the number of those who are admitted to colleges. Even though there is political pressure on many State Governments to build new colleges and to reserve more seats for backward classes, it will be sheer folly to expand such facilities recklessly without giving any thought to the quality of education imparted. If admissions are made far more selective, it will automatically reduce the number of entrants. This should apply particularly to new colleges, many of which are little more than degree factories. Only then can the authorities hope to bring down the teacher-student ratio to manageable proportions. What is more, teachers should be given refresher courses every summer vacation to brush up their knowledge. Besides, if college managements increase the library budget it will help both the staff and the students a great deal. At the same time, however, it will be unfair to deny college education to thousands of young men and women unless employers stop insisting on degrees even for clerical jobs. For a start, why can't the Government disqualify graduates from securing certain jobs-say Class III and Class IV posts? Once the link between degrees and jobs is severed at least in some important departments, it will make young people think twice before joining college.The author’s chief concern seems to be
    • A. 

      Frustration among students

    • B. 

      Standard of education

    • C. 

      Delinking of degrees and jobs

    • D. 

      Spread of college education

    • E. 

      Autonomy to colleges

  • 36. 
    Which of the following is the main difficulty, according to the passage, in the way of improving standards?
    • A. 

      Paucity of library facility

    • B. 

      Paucity of funds

    • C. 

      Ever increasing number of young men wanting degree

    • D. 

      Grant of autonomy to colleges

    • E. 

      Absence of refresher courses

  • 37. 
    Choose the word/group of words which is most similar in meaning to the word! group of words printed In bold as used in the passage.YAMMER
    • A. 

      Strike

    • B. 

      Exclaim

    • C. 

      Whimper

    • D. 

      Shiver

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 38. 
    Choose the word/group of words which is most similar in meaning to the word! group of words printed In bold as used in the passage.SEETHE
    • A. 

      Boil

    • B. 

      Spill

    • C. 

      Look inwards

    • D. 

      Catch

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 39. 
    Choose the word/group of words which is most opposite in meaning to the words printed in bold as used in the passage.ANATHEMA
    • A. 

      Benediction

    • B. 

      Mercy

    • C. 

      Anger

    • D. 

      Amnesty

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 40. 
    Choose the word/group of words which is most opposite in meaning to the words printed in bold as used in the passage.NEFARIOUS
    • A. 

      Virtuous

    • B. 

      Immortal

    • C. 

      Pious

    • D. 

      Clandestine

    • E. 

      None of these