Hidden EP Quiz No.13

50 Questions | Total Attempts: 994

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Hidden EP Quiz No.13

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    In 1978, American Institute of Planners (established 1917) and American Society of Planning Officials (established 1934) combined to become the present-day
    • A. 

      American Institute of Environmental Planning

    • B. 

      Royal Institute ofTown and County Planning

    • C. 

      Planning Society of All-America

    • D. 

      American Planning Association

  • 2. 
    The first State-wide land use plan in 1973 which defined Urban Growth Boundaries (UGBs) that separated urban and rural areas in order to limit growth within serviced areas and to preserve rural farmland for a timeframe of 20 years, took place in the State of 
    • A. 

      Oregon

    • B. 

      New York

    • C. 

      California

    • D. 

      Florida

  • 3. 
    Which planning concept, first upheld by the US Supreme Court in the 1976 case o('Penn Central Transportation Co. versus City of New York incorporates a market mechanism to mitigate whatever financial burden local law might have imposed on property?
    • A. 

      Planned Unit Development

    • B. 

      Conservation Easements

    • C. 

      Transfer of Development Rights

    • D. 

      Eminent Domain

  • 4. 
    In all but one of following cases, the US Supreme Court declared "takings" by government as illegal, as it upheld the Constitutional precept that "private property shall not be taken for public use without just compensation"
    • A. 

      Where a regulation is merely intended to preventa nuisance and remove discomfort caused to the public

    • B. 

      Where a regulation forced a landowner to allow someone else to enter onto the property,

    • C. 

      Where a regulation imposes burdens or costs on a landowner that do not bear a reasonable relationship to the impacts of the project on the community;

    • D. 

      Where government can equally accomplish a valid public purpose through less intrusive regulation or through a requirement of dedicating property

    • E. 

      Where a landowner has been denied all economically viable use of the land

  • 5. 
    In 1987, United States Supreme Court in the case· of Nollan versus California Coastal Commission ruled against- California which required Nollan to dedicate a public sidewalk easement across their beachfront property as a building permit condition, thus the Court formulated a principle for governments regulatory action that "land use restrictions must be tied directly to a specific public purpose."
    • A. 

      Rough Proportionality

    • B. 

      Calibrated Enforcement

    • C. 

      Calculated Authority

    • D. 

      Rational Nexus

  • 6. 
    This school of thought claims that cities or human settlements can be studied as though they are biological organisms subject to laws of evolution, natural selection, competition, adaptation, survival of the fittest, decline, and death.
    • A. 

      Dialectical Historical Materialism

    • B. 

      AnarchoSyndicalism by Saul David Afinsky

    • C. 

      Frankfurt School of Social Critical Theory

    • D. 

      Chicago school of human ecology

  • 7. 
    Central Place Theory was found faulty in assuming uniform topography, fiat featureless terrain, ease of travel in all directions and ubiquity or all around presence of economic resources, but its major strength lies in characterizing the locational advantages of one place in relation to another, a geographic concept called -
    • A. 

      Surrounding

    • B. 

      Standing

    • C. 

      Situation

    • D. 

      State

  • 8. 
    The weakness of applying Central Place.Theory in a simplistic way on the Philippines is that
    • A. 

      Unlike other countlies, Philippines does not have compact land mass with homogenous features

    • B. 

      Archipelagic nature creates natural discontinuities that render movement & economic exchange difficult

    • C. 

      Spatial integration between urban and rural areas is impeded by poor transport that inflates prices

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 9. 
    128.    George Zipfs Rank-Size Rule, "Pn=P1/N*** was derived from Christallers Central Place Theory, and asserts that the population of city "n" is equal to the population of the largest city "1" divided by the rank of "n" in the hierarchy of aces. If the largest city in immediately preceding question had 2.6 million people in 2007 official census, using Zipfs rule what should have been the population of Davao City if it was ranked Number?
    • A. 

      520,000

    • B. 

      1,520,000

    • C. 

      1,300,000

    • D. 

      650,000

  • 10. 
    Does the formula of George Zipf in the immediately preceding question match the reality on the ground based on 2007 Official Census of the National Statistics Office?
    • A. 

      Yes

    • B. 

      Partially

    • C. 

      No

    • D. 

      Depends on whether old Davao City or Metro Davao is being a;ialyzed

  • 11. 
    Neo-classical Urban Bid-Rent theory provides the formula for Location Rent at center of city as equal= to 'Rent Gradient' times 'Radius' where 'Rent Gradient' is equal to 'transport cost per capita per year' multiplied by 'density per sq.km'. If Pateros has a radius distance of 10.266 km from the center of Metro Manila, with average density of= 29,495.24 persons per km.In 2009 and P15,330 transport cost per capita per year, what should be the location rent per square meter in Pateros as periphery-town of Metro Manila? (clue: convert sq.km to sq.m.)
    • A. 

      4,641 per m2

    • B. 

      around 46,41 0 per m2

    • C. 

      Around 464,100 per m2

    • D. 

      Around 464.10 per m2

  • 12. 
    According to Raleigh Barlowe (1958), this refers to the most profitable use of land when it yields optimum returns gen limited inputs; such returns can either be monetary or non-monetary, tangible or intangible, based on the criteria and interest of the person who makes such decisions.
    • A. 

      Maximum Sustainable Rent

    • B. 

      Maximum Sustainable Yield

    • C. 

      Profit Maximization

    • D. 

      Highest and Best Use

  • 13. 
    In Peirce Lewis' revision of the Ernest Burgess' monocentric model of urban land use, which of the following describes the spatial decline of concentric cities least effective. 
    • A. 

      The elite and their businesses leave the inner core due to pollution and congestion.

    • B. 

      Hollowing-out of the core results in the "donut shape"

    • C. 

      Surrounded by the poor in the historic center, government increasingly becomes captive to pressure groups

    • D. 

      Land values rapidly fall in inner-city areas experiencing urban blight and urban decay.

  • 14. 
    In Urban land use models of the Chicago school of human ecology, the affluent and middle classes are inclined to E- away from downtown and inner-city in favor of suburban locations and this process results in a paradox or "spatial mismatch" as regards labor.
    • A. 

      Sophisticated upperdasses locate in city-edges with semi-rural conditions where no employment is available

    • B. 

      Lower-classes who cannot create employment by themselves are left to occupy high-priced land in the inner core of cities.

    • C. 

      Blue-collar workers are forced to accept !ow-skill jobs as maids. yayas, gardeners in affluent suburban subdivisions

    • D. 

      Non-tax paying people in the informal sector are closer to the seat of government than the landed gentry

  • 15. 
    Social status declines with increasing distance from the center of the city" is a proposition about poor Third World countries that contradicts the original land use models from the Chicago school of human ecology,
    • A. 

      Donut model

    • B. 

      Core-Periphery Dependency Model

    • C. 

      Polycentric model

    • D. 

      Inverse Concentric

  • 16. 
    According to M. White (1987), the more economically complex a city, the more varied would be the number of high growth points, the more socially complex it becomes, and the stronger is its tendency towards differentiation such as in the case of residents segregating themselves into enclaves according to economic level, social status, or ethnicity.
    • A. 

      Bipolar Model

    • B. 

      Palimpsest or Mosaic Model

    • C. 

      Multiple Nuclei

    • D. 

      Urban Land Nexus Theory

  • 17. 
    Advancements in transportation and communication technologies have affected many cities in such a way that information based production can be done by anyone, anywhere at any time regardless of distance from city center. Which of the following is the likely spatial form arising from these economic trends? 
    • A. 

      Cyber-city sends all dirty smokestack industries to remote regions.

    • B. 

      CBD becomes an elongated corridor or spine following the lines of telecommunications & electronic services

    • C. 

      Suburban subdivisions form a belt-like edge or natural perimeter around the mother city

    • D. 

      Edge cities, office parks, and techno-poles develop in various parts of a complex mother city

  • 18. 
    According to Wilbur Richard Thompson (1965), once a city reaches a resident population of 250.000, it attains L1 permanence. Certain city sections may suffer decay and decline, but the city as a whole will survive because of sheer size and strength of tertiary economy, inherent capacity to diversify, and its political weight vis-a-vis other settlements.
    • A. 

      Urban land Nexus

    • B. 

      Urban Ratchet Theory

    • C. 

      Urban Spiral Economy

    • D. 

      Urban Force Momentum

  • 19. 
    By plotting on a graph the economic benefits from agglomeration against the costs of congestion and overconcentration, Leo Klaasen concluded that 'Optimum City Size' of a viable city should be between
    • A. 

      20,000-190,000

    • B. 

      200,000 -600,000

    • C. 

      700,000-One million

    • D. 

      One million -Two million

  • 20. 
    The following are characteristics of a central business district. Which one increases the LGU responsibility to feguard the well­being of people, often beyond the capacities of a single local authority?
    • A. 

      Large concentration of office and retail activities;

    • B. 

      Significantly large number of tertiary and service jobs generated

    • C. 

      High price of land forces property-owners to build high

    • D. 

      Large regular inflow and outflow of motorists; daytime population higher than nighttime population

  • 21. 
    Not all megacities become 'world cities'. According to David Simon in World City Hypothesis (1996), the following criteria determines how a city reaches Tier 1 status. Which criterion is pursued as cities 'de-industrialize' by banishing dirty smokestack industries from their territories in the contest to achieve "greater global competitiveness"?
    • A. 

      Existence of a sophisticated financial and service complex serving a global clientele

    • B. 

      Level of international networks of capital information and communication flows

    • C. 

      large number of headquarters of international institutions

    • D. 

      Quality of life conducive to attracting investors and retaining skilled international migrants

  • 22. 
    Which concern of regional planning pertains to institutional capacitation of focal governments, and the appropriate distribution of authority among them?
    • A. 

      spatial integration between urban and rural settlements

    • B. 

      Complementation among agriculture, industry, other sectors

    • C. 

      Balanced distribution of population

    • D. 

      Federalism and decentralization of development

    • E. 

      Equitable distribution of resources among places

    • F. 

      Reduction of economic disparities among regions

  • 23. 
    Earliest regional planning models in USA in 1933 revolved around Tennessee Valley, Dallas Plain, Columbia River Basin, Colorado River, St Lawrence Seaway, Delaware River, Chesapeake Bay watershad, which are essentially
    • A. 

      Cultural or ethno-linguistic regions

    • B. 

      Deltaic riverine regions

    • C. 

      Natural regions

    • D. 

      Crossborder regions

  • 24. 
    According to economists Theodore Schultz, Jacob Mincer, and Gary S.Becker, this collective term for people's embodied assets such as knowledge, skills, good health, attitudes, and entrepreneurial qualities, determines how a local community or region absorbs new technologies, expands productive capacity and generates own progress.
    • A. 

      Seven Domains of Intelligence

    • B. 

      Intellectual Quotient

    • C. 

      Managerial Aptitude

    • D. 

      Human Capital

  • 25. 
    The twin strategy of 'concentrated decentralization' and 'industrial dispersal' to correct urban primacy and inter-regional divergence in the Philippines was begun under the administration of President
    • A. 

      Carlos P. Garcia

    • B. 

      Ferdinand E. Marcos

    • C. 

      Corazon C. Aquino

    • D. 

      Fidel V. Ramos

    • E. 

      Gloria M. Arroyo

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