AP English: Frankenstein Novel Questions! Trivia Quiz

75 Questions | Total Attempts: 293

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AP English: Frankenstein Novel Questions! Trivia Quiz

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Frankenstein’s initial reaction upon meeting with his creature can best be described as
    • A. 

      Profound despair

    • B. 

      Uncontrollable rage

    • C. 

      Paralyzing terror

    • D. 

      Heart-felt compassion

  • 2. 
    The creature recollects Victor’s initial rejection of him vividly.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 3. 
     The creature’s words and actions suggest all the following EXCEPT
    • A. 

      He respects the connection between creator and created

    • B. 

      He intends to deal with Frankenstein through threats

    • C. 

      He regrets the criminal deeds he has committed

    • D. 

      He has no intention of justifying himself to Frankenstein

  • 4. 
    Victor agrees to listen to the creature’s tale out of the all of the following EXCEPT
    • A. 

      A sense of duty to his creation

    • B. 

      Fear of his own well-being

    • C. 

      The need to confirm the murderer of his brother

    • D. 

      Curiosity and compassion

  • 5. 
    All of the following experiences compare the creature to an infant EXCEPT:
    • A. 

      His fascination with the moon.

    • B. 

      His ignorance of fire and wine.

    • C. 

      His need for a female companion.

    • D. 

      The predominance of his physical sensations.

  • 6. 
    The creature expresses a profound fear of anything related to nature.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 7. 
     As the creature watches the kindness and affection DeLacy shows his granddaughter, he
    • A. 

      Experiences a feeling he defines as hunger and thirst.

    • B. 

      Recognizes his lack of companionship.

    • C. 

      Experiences an indescribable sensation unlike any he has felt before.

    • D. 

      Grows angry at the sight of others feeling the affection denied him.

  • 8. 
    The creature determines not to approach the Delaceys until he has
    • A. 

      Provided them sufficient supplies to last the winter

    • B. 

      Determined his proper origins

    • C. 

      Befriended the children separately

    • D. 

      Mastered their language

  • 9. 
    Which of the following books is NOT one the creature reads in this section of the novel?
    • A. 

      The Bible

    • B. 

      Paradise Lost

    • C. 

      Plutarch’s Lives

    • D. 

      Goethe’s Sorrows of Werter

  • 10. 
    The creature discovers his origins by reading of them in Victor’s journal.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 11. 
    From his readings, the creature learns of the following EXCEPT
    • A. 

      The true story of the DeLacey family

    • B. 

      Humanity’s capacities for good and evil

    • C. 

      His own loneliness

    • D. 

      To admire and love the heroes of past ages

  • 12. 
    As a consequence of his meeting with DeLacey, the creature
    • A. 

      Gains the lasting acceptance he has so desperately sought

    • B. 

      Determines to show humanity the very kindness it has denied him

    • C. 

      Lapses into a despair mitigated only by an act of violence

    • D. 

      Withdraws from the larger world

  • 13. 
    Pathetic fallacy occurs when an author personifies inanimate objects to highlight the emotional expression of the characters involved in the scene. Which is NOT an example of this?
    • A. 

      The fierce wind and the raging fire consuming the DeLacey cottage

    • B. 

      The tranquil Alpine air ministering to the creature’s sufferings

    • C. 

      The gentle light of the moon enchanting the creature

    • D. 

      The rushing stream threatening to drown the child

  • 14. 
    The creature’s various good deeds
    • A. 

      Often go unnoticed or are ignored entirely

    • B. 

      Ultimately result in his affliction

    • C. 

      Help distract others from his horrid appearance

    • D. 

      Run counter to his nature

  • 15. 
    The creature undertakes connecting with William Frankenstein because
    • A. 

      He knows the boy is related to Victor

    • B. 

      The child reminds him of Agatha DeLacey

    • C. 

      He identifies with the child’s innocence

    • D. 

      He feels William has not yet fallen to the prejudices of society

  • 16. 
    Standing over William’s corpse, the creature feels
    • A. 

      Triumph and exaltation

    • B. 

      Self-loathing

    • C. 

      Moral confusion

    • D. 

      Misery and torment

  • 17. 
    At the close of his tale, the creature demands Victor
    • A. 

      Swear never to repeat his horrid experiments

    • B. 

      Make him a mate

    • C. 

      Promise to locate and care for the DeLaceys

    • D. 

      Teach him the ways of human interactionIdentify the speaker unless otherwise indicated

  • 18. 
    "I was benevolent and good, but misery made me a fiend."
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      DeLacey

    • D. 

      Justine

  • 19. 
    "The crime had its source in HER; HERS be the punishment!"
    • A. 

      Elizabeth

    • B. 

      Safie

    • C. 

      Caroline Frankenstein

    • D. 

      Justine

  • 20. 
    "Devil, do you dare approach me? and do not you fear the fierce vengeance of my arm wreaked on your miserable head?"
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      William

    • D. 

      Felix

  • 21. 
    "How dare you sport thus with life?"
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      DeLacey

    • D. 

      Felix

  • 22. 
    "[I] cannot judge of your countenance, but there is something in your words which persuades me that you are sincere."
    • A. 

      The creature

    • B. 

      Victor

    • C. 

      DeLacey

    • D. 

      Felix

  • 23. 
    "…THIS LITTLE CREATURE was unprejudiced, and had lived too short a time to have imbibed a horror of deformity."
    • A. 

      William

    • B. 

      Safie

    • C. 

      Agatha

    • D. 

      Justine

  • 24. 
    "…but the hearts of men, when unprejudiced by any obvious self-interest, are full of brotherly love and charity. Rely, therefore, on your hopes…."
    • A. 

      The creature

    • B. 

      DeLacey

    • C. 

      William

    • D. 

      Felix

  • 25. 
    "But hear me. The guilty are allowed, by human laws, bloody as they are, to speak in their own defence before they are condemned."
    • A. 

      The creature

    • B. 

      DeLacey

    • C. 

      Victor

    • D. 

      Justine

  • 26. 
    Although Victor’s spirits are partially restored, to what does his father attribute his unusual behavior and attitude?
    • A. 

      Victor’s fears of fulfilling his promise to the creature.

    • B. 

      His belief that Victor does not wish to marry Elizabeth but feels bound to do so.

    • C. 

      The overwhelming news of William and Justine’s deaths.

    • D. 

      The workload of Victor’s studies in Ingolstadt.

  • 27. 
    Why did Victor wish to visit England?
    • A. 

      He wanted to confer with a renowned scientist whose work would help him fulfill his promise.

    • B. 

      He had promised the creature he would visit London and Oxford for souvenirs.

    • C. 

      Henry had suggested another walking tour and Victor felt it would help him forget.

    • D. 

      He wished to run as far away from the creature as possible.

  • 28. 
    When the friends split where does Victor go and what was he doing there?
    • A. 

      To Ireland to study Oriental languages.

    • B. 

      Back to Geneva to build a mate for his creature.

    • C. 

      To Scotland to fulfill his promise.

    • D. 

      To the Arctic to find the North Pole.

  • 29. 
    In Chapter 20, what did the creature see that caused within him a “howl of devilish despair”?
    • A. 

      Victor happily married to Elizabeth.

    • B. 

      Victor wrongfully imprisoned for murder.

    • C. 

      The hanging of an innocent girl.

    • D. 

      Victor destroying his mate’s inanimate body.

  • 30. 
    Victor disposes of the creature’s mate in a raging fire.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 31. 
    When Victor finally returns to land after being lost at sea, why must he meet with Mr. Kirwin?
    • A. 

      Mr. Kirwin, his father’s lawyer, informs Victor of his father’s death.

    • B. 

      Victor is accused of Clerval’s murder and must meet with the local magistrate.

    • C. 

      An accomplished scientist, Mr. Kirwin has made advances which could help Victor.

    • D. 

      Kirwin is actually the creature in disguise checking up on Victor’s progress.

  • 32. 
    What was the main point of Elizabeth’s letter?
    • A. 

      To beg Victor to return and marry her.

    • B. 

      To give her condolences on Henry’s murder.

    • C. 

      To release him from marital obligations.

    • D. 

      To remind him of his duties toward his creature.

  • 33. 
    When Victor visits the graves of his loved ones before departing Geneva for the last time, he does so
    • A. 

      To apologize for being the instrument of their destruction

    • B. 

      To draw the creature there and trap him

    • C. 

      To commit suicide in his despair

    • D. 

      To swear to avenge their deaths and to call upon their aid in this quest

  • 34. 
    During his pursuit of the creature, why did night give Victor the only joy he knew?
    • A. 

      Night concealed his whereabouts from the creature.

    • B. 

      Night reminded him of the death he longed for as release.

    • C. 

      In his dreams, Victor was reunited with the dead.

    • D. 

      At night Victor would build enormous bonfires for warmth.

  • 35. 
    What final request did Frankenstein make of Walton?
    • A. 

      Reverse his course to return to England.

    • B. 

      Never retell Victor’s story to another soul.

    • C. 

      Bury his body in Geneva.

    • D. 

      Continue Victor’s quest of destruction.

  • 36. 
    What is Frankenstein’s final advice to Walton?
    • A. 

      Treasure your childhood friends who know your infantine dispositions and can best judge the integrity of your motives.

    • B. 

      Return home as heroes who have fought and conquered and who know not what it is to turn their backs on a foe.

    • C. 

      Be men, or be more than men. Be steady to your purposes and firm as a rock.

    • D. 

      Seek peace in tranquility and avoid ambition, even if it be only to discover yourself in science and discoveries.

  • 37. 
    In Walton’s cabin, the creature gloats triumphantly over the corpse of his creator.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 38. 
    What is the final fate of Frankenstein’s creature?
    • A. 

      He determines to remain in the Arctic beyond contact with humanity.

    • B. 

      He returns with Walton to a new life in the deepest forests of England.

    • C. 

      He will destroy himself in a funeral pyre and find solace in death itself.

    • D. 

      He will continue to walk the earth until science can find a way to save him from loneliness.

  • 39. 
    "Are you to be happy, while I grovel in the intensity of my wretchedness? You can blast my other passions; but revenge remains—revenge, henceforth dearer than light or food!"
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      Elizabeth

    • D. 

      Walton

  • 40. 
    "What a glorious creature he must have been in the days of his prosperity, when he is thus noble and godlike in his ruin! He seems to feel his own worth, and the greatness of his fall."
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      Elizabeth

    • D. 

      Walton

  • 41. 
    "I am satisfied: miserable wretch! You have determined to live, and I am satistfied!"
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      Elizabeth

    • D. 

      Walton

  • 42. 
    Who is described as “…a being formed in the ‘very poetry of nature’ [whose] wild and enthusiastic imagination was chastened by the sensibility of his heart”?
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      Clerval

    • C. 

      Elizabeth

    • D. 

      Walton

  • 43. 
    "I, like the arch-fiend bore a hell within me; and, finding myself unsympathised with, wished to tear up the trees, spread havoc and destruction around me, and then to have sat down and enjoyed the ruin."
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      Clerval

    • D. 

      Walton

  • 44. 
    "Think YOU that the groans of Clerval were music to my ears?"
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      Elizabeth

    • D. 

      Walton

  • 45. 
    "But I am a blasted tree; the bolt has entered my soul; and I felt then that I should survive to exhibit what I shall soon cease to be – a miserable spectacle of humanity; pitiable to others, and intolerable to myself."
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      Elizabeth

    • D. 

      Walton

  • 46. 
    "…and if I but see one smile on your lips when we meet, occasioned by this or any other exertion of mine, I shall need no other happiness."
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      Elizabeth

    • D. 

      Walton

  • 47. 
    "How dare you sport thus with life? Do your duty toward me, and I will do mine towards you and all mankind."
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      Elizabeth

    • D. 

      Walton

  • 48. 
    "My life, as it passed thus, was indeed hateful to me, and it was during sleep alone that I could taste joy. O blessed sleep! often, when most miserable, I sank to repose, and my dreams lulled me even to rapture."
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      Elizabeth

    • D. 

      Walton

  • 49. 
    "You throw a torch into a pile of buildings; and when they are consumed, you sit among the ruins, and lament the fall. Hypocritical fiend…! It is not pity you feel; you lament only because the victim of your malignity is withdrawn from your power."
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      Elizabeth

    • D. 

      Walton

  • 50. 
    "You hate me; but your abhorrence cannot equal that with which I regard myself."
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      Elizabeth

    • D. 

      Walton

  • 51. 
    The narrator of the letters is:
    • A. 

      Mary W. Shelley

    • B. 

      Victor Frankenstein

    • C. 

      Robert Walton

    • D. 

      The creature

  • 52. 
    To whom is the first letter addressed?
    • A. 

      Mrs. Elizabeth Frankenstein in Vienna from her husband in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    • B. 

      Mrs. Margaret Saville in St. Petersburg from her brother in England.

    • C. 

      Mrs. Mary W. Shelley in England from her father in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    • D. 

      Mrs. Margaret Saville in England from her brother in St. Petersburg, Russia.

  • 53. 
    Why is Robert Walton sailing so far from home?
    • A. 

      He wishes to be the first explorer to circumnavigate the globe.

    • B. 

      He is on a voyage of discovery to the North Pole.

    • C. 

      He has disgraced his family and is seeking glory to regain his respect.

    • D. 

      He races sailboats for profit and has wagered to sail to Russia in three months.

  • 54. 
    In Walton’s opinion, what is the “most severe evil” of his voyage?
    • A. 

      Separation from family.

    • B. 

      The lack of companionship.

    • C. 

      His inability to attend Mass.

    • D. 

      His love of glory.

  • 55. 
    Which of the following events did not occur while Walton and his crew were surrounded by ice?
    • A. 

      They perceived the gigantic figure of a man riding a dog-sled across the ice.

    • B. 

      They find the remains of a European skeleton and a dog frozen in the ice beside the ship.

    • C. 

      They rescue a nearly dead European and his dog from a large ice floe.

    • D. 

      They discover an albatross like the one from Coleridge’s poem.

  • 56. 
    How does the stranger shock Walton and his crew?
    • A. 

      He demands that they relinquish control of the vessel to him.

    • B. 

      He refuses to be rescued from the ice until they reveal their destination.

    • C. 

      He knows each of them previous voyages and speaks all of their languages.

    • D. 

      He seems possessed by unearthly forces.

  • 57. 
    Which of the following best describes the stranger Walton and his crew discover?
    • A. 

      Melancholic and despairing, though benevolent and thankful for help.

    • B. 

      Bitterly angry at the crew and resentful of their efforts to preserve him.

    • C. 

      Incoherent and babbling endlessly about evil specters and monsters of darkness.

    • D. 

      Lighthearted and jovial, constantly joking with the men to keep their spirits up.

  • 58. 
    Considering Walton’s descriptions of the new passenger, how do you think he feels about the stranger?
    • A. 

      He considers him a threat to the crew and their mission.

    • B. 

      He sees the stranger as a noble creature and strikes an easy friendship with him.

    • C. 

      He is deeply disturbed by the stranger’s personality and wants nothing to do with him.

    • D. 

      He admires the stranger for his obvious education, but wants to leave him at the next port of call.

  • 59. 
    Why does the stranger decide to tell Walton his story?
    • A. 

      Walton has bombarded him with questions about his past ever since he came on board.

    • B. 

      The stranger wants Walton’s opinion of what he should do with his life.

    • C. 

      The stranger sees himself in Walton and wants to warn him from following in his footsteps.

    • D. 

      The crew threatens to harm the stranger if he does not tell them about himself.

  • 60. 
    What are the stranger’s earliest recollections of his parents?
    • A. 

      Their bitter arguments and screaming at each other.

    • B. 

      None, since they abandoned him at birth.

    • C. 

      His mother’s tender caresses and father’s smiles.

    • D. 

      Their poverty and coldness toward him.

  • 61. 
    How does Elizabeth enter the Frankenstein household?
    • A. 

      She was adopted from an impoverished family.

    • B. 

      She is the third child their mother died delivering.

    • C. 

      She was abandoned on the doorstep one Christmas.

    • D. 

      She belonged to a servant in legal troubles.

  • 62. 
    Which of the following best describes Clerval?
    • A. 

      A romantic risk-taker who loved make-believe and morality.

    • B. 

      A calculated thinker and scientist interested in the causes of the natural world.

    • C. 

      A quiet introvert who enjoyed writing love poems, but never revealing any of them.

    • D. 

      A pugnacious bully and rascal who threatened Frankenstein and Elizabeth periodically.

  • 63. 
    What were Victor’s main interests as a child?
    • A. 

      The aerial creations of the poets

    • B. 

      The moral relations of things

    • C. 

      The metaphysical secrets of heaven and earth

    • D. 

      The magnificent appearance of things

  • 64. 
    How did Frankenstein’s mother die?
    • A. 

      She was killed in a chance farming accident.

    • B. 

      She was murdered by the monster.

    • C. 

      Her heart failed from a genetic defect.

    • D. 

      She contracted an illness while tending Elizabeth

  • 65. 
    Where does Frankenstein go at the age of seventeen?
    • A. 

      To serve in the military in Ingolstadt.

    • B. 

      To manage his father’s factory in Geneva.

    • C. 

      To study at the university in Ingolstadt.

    • D. 

      To seek his fortune as a sailor.

  • 66. 
    Whose guidance proved crucial to Victor’s scientific interests?
    • A. 

      M. Krempe

    • B. 

      R. Walton

    • C. 

      M. Waldman

    • D. 

      H. Clerval

  • 67. 
    What observation does Victor make regarding the pursuit of science?
    • A. 

      Unlike other fields, science has a definite beginning and end.

    • B. 

      Science does not offer much to the mind that questions the universe.

    • C. 

      The field of science offers continual discoveries and wonders.

    • D. 

      Victor decides that there are too many moral dilemmas in science and he studies English instead.

  • 68. 
    What question did Victor often ask himself about science?
    • A. 

      Does God really exist?

    • B. 

      Where does life itself come from?

    • C. 

      What part does morality play in scientific experimentation?

    • D. 

      How can disease and suffering be avoided?

  • 69. 
    Describe Victor’s attitude toward death and the supernatural.
    • A. 

      Sheltered from horrors as a child, he had no fear of ghost stories or graveyards.

    • B. 

      Death and tales of the supernatural were common in his family, so they did not frighten him.

    • C. 

      The death of his mother had psychologically scarred Victor and he was terrified of corpses.

    • D. 

      His parents were once undertakers in Geneva and he was constantly exposed to death.

  • 70. 
    When Victor brings his creature to life, his first reaction is one of:
    • A. 

      Exaltation and pride

    • B. 

      Disbelief

    • C. 

      Disappointment and disgust

    • D. 

      Anger.

  • 71. 
    When he discovers the creature at his bedside, Frankenstein:
    • A. 

      Flees in terror from the thing he had created.

    • B. 

      Attacks the creature with a burning torch.

    • C. 

      Forces the creature into the courtyard and imprisons it there.

    • D. 

      Attempts to communicate with the creature but only angers it in the process.

  • 72. 
    Who arrives in Ingolstadt to visit Victor?
    • A. 

      Elizabeth

    • B. 

      His father

    • C. 

      M. Waldman

    • D. 

      Clerval

  • 73. 
    What tragic news does Victor receive from home?
    • A. 

      His father has fallen ill with scarlet fever.

    • B. 

      Elizabeth has eloped with a local fisherman.

    • C. 

      His youngest brother has been found murdered.

    • D. 

      His father cannot afford the university tuition.

  • 74. 
    What information does Victor gain upon returning home?
    • A. 

      Elizabeth is guilty of William’s murder.

    • B. 

      His family suspects Victor’s creature of the murderer.

    • C. 

      Justine is accused of William’s murder.

    • D. 

      Victor himself stands accused of the murder.

  • 75. 
    What happens to Victor almost immediately after welcoming his new guest?
    • A. 

      His creature has been spotted near the university.

    • B. 

      He suffers from a nervous fever for months.

    • C. 

      He ends his experiments to resume his studies.

    • D. 

      Clerval encourages his experiments.