AP English: Frankenstein Novel Questions! Trivia Quiz

75 Questions | Total Attempts: 330

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AP English: Frankenstein Novel Questions! Trivia Quiz

Mary Shelley authored the novel “Frankenstein,” first published in 1818. The book is about a scientist who creates something of a monster during an experiment. It doesn’t take long very before the reader begins to identify with the monster, pitying it while knowing that all it wants is love. The story was a complex horror story, and it became very popular. Take this quiz and get to know Dr. Frankenstein and his creation.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Frankenstein’s initial reaction upon meeting with his creature can best be described as
    • A. 

      Profound despair

    • B. 

      Uncontrollable rage

    • C. 

      Paralyzing terror

    • D. 

      Heart-felt compassion

  • 2. 
    The creature recollects Victor’s initial rejection of him vividly.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 3. 
     The creature’s words and actions suggest all the following EXCEPT
    • A. 

      He respects the connection between creator and created

    • B. 

      He intends to deal with Frankenstein through threats

    • C. 

      He regrets the criminal deeds he has committed

    • D. 

      He has no intention of justifying himself to Frankenstein

  • 4. 
    Victor agrees to listen to the creature’s tale out of the all of the following EXCEPT
    • A. 

      A sense of duty to his creation

    • B. 

      Fear of his own well-being

    • C. 

      The need to confirm the murderer of his brother

    • D. 

      Curiosity and compassion

  • 5. 
    All of the following experiences compare the creature to an infant EXCEPT:
    • A. 

      His fascination with the moon.

    • B. 

      His ignorance of fire and wine.

    • C. 

      His need for a female companion.

    • D. 

      The predominance of his physical sensations.

  • 6. 
    The creature expresses a profound fear of anything related to nature.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 7. 
     As the creature watches the kindness and affection DeLacy shows his granddaughter, he
    • A. 

      Experiences a feeling he defines as hunger and thirst.

    • B. 

      Recognizes his lack of companionship.

    • C. 

      Experiences an indescribable sensation unlike any he has felt before.

    • D. 

      Grows angry at the sight of others feeling the affection denied him.

  • 8. 
    The creature determines not to approach the Delaceys until he has
    • A. 

      Provided them sufficient supplies to last the winter

    • B. 

      Determined his proper origins

    • C. 

      Befriended the children separately

    • D. 

      Mastered their language

  • 9. 
    Which of the following books is NOT one the creature reads in this section of the novel?
    • A. 

      The Bible

    • B. 

      Paradise Lost

    • C. 

      Plutarch’s Lives

    • D. 

      Goethe’s Sorrows of Werter

  • 10. 
    The creature discovers his origins by reading of them in Victor’s journal.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 11. 
    From his readings, the creature learns of the following EXCEPT
    • A. 

      The true story of the DeLacey family

    • B. 

      Humanity’s capacities for good and evil

    • C. 

      His own loneliness

    • D. 

      To admire and love the heroes of past ages

  • 12. 
    As a consequence of his meeting with DeLacey, the creature
    • A. 

      Gains the lasting acceptance he has so desperately sought

    • B. 

      Determines to show humanity the very kindness it has denied him

    • C. 

      Lapses into a despair mitigated only by an act of violence

    • D. 

      Withdraws from the larger world

  • 13. 
    Pathetic fallacy occurs when an author personifies inanimate objects to highlight the emotional expression of the characters involved in the scene. Which is NOT an example of this?
    • A. 

      The fierce wind and the raging fire consuming the DeLacey cottage

    • B. 

      The tranquil Alpine air ministering to the creature’s sufferings

    • C. 

      The gentle light of the moon enchanting the creature

    • D. 

      The rushing stream threatening to drown the child

  • 14. 
    The creature’s various good deeds
    • A. 

      Often go unnoticed or are ignored entirely

    • B. 

      Ultimately result in his affliction

    • C. 

      Help distract others from his horrid appearance

    • D. 

      Run counter to his nature

  • 15. 
    The creature undertakes connecting with William Frankenstein because
    • A. 

      He knows the boy is related to Victor

    • B. 

      The child reminds him of Agatha DeLacey

    • C. 

      He identifies with the child’s innocence

    • D. 

      He feels William has not yet fallen to the prejudices of society

  • 16. 
    Standing over William’s corpse, the creature feels
    • A. 

      Triumph and exaltation

    • B. 

      Self-loathing

    • C. 

      Moral confusion

    • D. 

      Misery and torment

  • 17. 
    At the close of his tale, the creature demands Victor
    • A. 

      Swear never to repeat his horrid experiments

    • B. 

      Make him a mate

    • C. 

      Promise to locate and care for the DeLaceys

    • D. 

      Teach him the ways of human interactionIdentify the speaker unless otherwise indicated

  • 18. 
    "I was benevolent and good, but misery made me a fiend."
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      DeLacey

    • D. 

      Justine

  • 19. 
    "The crime had its source in HER; HERS be the punishment!"
    • A. 

      Elizabeth

    • B. 

      Safie

    • C. 

      Caroline Frankenstein

    • D. 

      Justine

  • 20. 
    "Devil, do you dare approach me? and do not you fear the fierce vengeance of my arm wreaked on your miserable head?"
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      William

    • D. 

      Felix

  • 21. 
    "How dare you sport thus with life?"
    • A. 

      Victor

    • B. 

      The creature

    • C. 

      DeLacey

    • D. 

      Felix

  • 22. 
    "[I] cannot judge of your countenance, but there is something in your words which persuades me that you are sincere."
    • A. 

      The creature

    • B. 

      Victor

    • C. 

      DeLacey

    • D. 

      Felix

  • 23. 
    "…THIS LITTLE CREATURE was unprejudiced, and had lived too short a time to have imbibed a horror of deformity."
    • A. 

      William

    • B. 

      Safie

    • C. 

      Agatha

    • D. 

      Justine

  • 24. 
    "…but the hearts of men, when unprejudiced by any obvious self-interest, are full of brotherly love and charity. Rely, therefore, on your hopes…."
    • A. 

      The creature

    • B. 

      DeLacey

    • C. 

      William

    • D. 

      Felix

  • 25. 
    "But hear me. The guilty are allowed, by human laws, bloody as they are, to speak in their own defence before they are condemned."
    • A. 

      The creature

    • B. 

      DeLacey

    • C. 

      Victor

    • D. 

      Justine

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