First 9 Weeks Reading Test

25 Questions | Total Attempts: 47

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Reading Quizzes & Trivia

Read the following stories and answer the questions. Some questions will be short answer/essay style. You are expected to answer then with grammatically correct, complete sentences.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Time Van              Miguel’s father was a professor, an inventor, and a little strange. He spent most of his free time in the garage tinkering with an old van. Whenever Miguel’s friends came over, they wanted to peek in the garage. Exciting things always seemed to be happening—funny smells, strange sounds, and sometimes even explosions. One day when Felipe was visiting, he and Miguel peered into the garage. Miguel’s father was nowhere to be seen. The old van was rusty and missing most of its wheels, but it looked inviting. “Let’s check it out,” said Felipe, walking toward the van. “I don’t know,” said Miguel. “We’ll be careful,” Felipe said, opening the driver’s door. The boys climbed in. Felipe noticed Miguel’s dad had made changes to the dashboard. There were all sorts of complicated levers and dials.  The biggest dial read “1.1.3000.”              “What does this do?” Felipe asked, pulling down the longest lever. The van began to shake. Then it started to spin. The boys closed their eyes. Soon the spinning stopped. Miguel opened one eye. The garage had changed. It was silver and shiny. There were funny-looking people moving about. One tapped on the window of the van. Miguel rolled it down.  “Excuse me, sir,” said an oddly metallic voice, “are you guests of the party?” Miguel stared blankly, too shocked to respond.  Felipe said quickly, “Yes, um…sorry we’re late.”   “No need to apologize. Just leave your space pod with us. We’ll park it,” the metal man responded. Miguel looked closely and realized the man was actually a robot! He looked at the levers and dials of the van once more.  “1.1.3000?” he muttered. “That’s a date! We’ve gone forward  in time. The van is a time machine!” “Cool!” Felipe said, getting out of the van. “And we landed at a New Year’s Eve party!” Miguel and Felipe followed the sounds of music and laughter. In a round pink room, they found people in strange, colorful clothing. Odd electronic music played. A boy in a shiny orange suit drew near. “Great costumes! What are you supposed to be, children from the past?” The boy called to a group of children across the room. “Hey! Come see their costumes. They look just like children on our history discs.” The children moved closer and marveled.        One girl said, “I’m PZ10. Who are you?”        “We’re Felipe and Miguel,” said Felipe.        “Right! That’s a good one! Names that go with your costumes!” The children all laughed. Robots entered the room with trays of food and drinks. The boys didn’t recognize anything on the trays. There were tall, skinny foods that looked like hard, green spaghetti. Some of the drinks fizzed. Others smoked. Miguel suddenly wasn’t hungry. Felipe dug right in.        “You should try those blue things. They’re great!” Felipe mumbled with his mouth full.        “No thanks,” Miguel said. He was feeling homesick. He wandered around the room. The walls were covered with television screens of different shapes and sizes, like picture frames. Miguel watched as one picture changed from a dusty, red planet to a lush green one. Then a robot from the garage arrived.        “Excuse me, sir. You have a call in your pod. Your father wishes you to come home,” the robot said.              Miguel lost no time in finding Felipe. The two boys quickly said goodbye to their new friends. Then they raced down the hall and back to the garage. They jumped in the van, programmed the dial, and pulled the lever. In a few minutes they opened their eyes. They were in the old garage with Miguel’s dad waving and shouting, “It works! Tell me all about your trip!”   Q: In “Time Van” which statement is best supported by the information in the story?
    • A. 

      Miguel’s friends liked to visit in order to see unique inventions in his garage

    • B. 

      Miguel travels through time often

    • C. 

      A person must be a mechanic in order to travel through time

    • D. 

      Miguel’s father was angry at the boys for playing in his van

  • 2. 
    Which of the following is not a difference Miguel and his friends noticed in the future world to which they traveled?
    • A. 

      Robots are servants in the future world Miguel and his friends visited

    • B. 

      Pets in the future are much smaller than the pets Miguel and his friends have

    • C. 

      Children in the future will be known by a code rather than by a name

    • D. 

      Food in the future is much different from the food Miguel and his friends normally eat

  • 3. 
                                                                                                        Time Van              Miguel’s father was a professor, an inventor, and a little strange. He spent most of his free time in the garage tinkering with an old van. Whenever Miguel’s friends came over, they wanted to peek in the garage. Exciting things always seemed to be happening—funny smells, strange sounds, and sometimes even explosions. One day when Felipe was visiting, he and Miguel peered into the garage. Miguel’s father was nowhere to be seen. The old van was rusty and missing most of its wheels, but it looked inviting. “Let’s check it out,” said Felipe, walking toward the van. “I don’t know,” said Miguel. “We’ll be careful,” Felipe said, opening the driver’s door. The boys climbed in. Felipe noticed Miguel’s dad had made changes to the dashboard. There were all sorts of complicated levers and dials.  The biggest dial read “1.1.3000.”              “What does this do?” Felipe asked, pulling down the longest lever. The van began to shake. Then it started to spin. The boys closed their eyes. Soon the spinning stopped. Miguel opened one eye. The garage had changed. It was silver and shiny. There were funny-looking people moving about. One tapped on the window of the van. Miguel rolled it down.  “Excuse me, sir,” said an oddly metallic voice, “are you guests of the party?” Miguel stared blankly, too shocked to respond.  Felipe said quickly, “Yes, um…sorry we’re late.”   “No need to apologize. Just leave your space pod with us. We’ll park it,” the metal man responded. Miguel looked closely and realized the man was actually a robot! He looked at the levers and dials of the van once more.  “1.1.3000?” he muttered. “That’s a date! We’ve gone forward  in time. The van is a time machine!” “Cool!” Felipe said, getting out of the van. “And we landed at a New Year’s Eve party!” Miguel and Felipe followed the sounds of music and laughter. In a round pink room, they found people in strange, colorful clothing. Odd electronic music played. A boy in a shiny orange suit drew near. “Great costumes! What are you supposed to be, children from the past?” The boy called to a group of children across the room. “Hey! Come see their costumes. They look just like children on our history discs.” The children moved closer and marveled.        One girl said, “I’m PZ10. Who are you?”        “We’re Felipe and Miguel,” said Felipe.        “Right! That’s a good one! Names that go with your costumes!” The children all laughed. Robots entered the room with trays of food and drinks. The boys didn’t recognize anything on the trays. There were tall, skinny foods that looked like hard, green spaghetti. Some of the drinks fizzed. Others smoked. Miguel suddenly wasn’t hungry. Felipe dug right in.        “You should try those blue things. They’re great!” Felipe mumbled with his mouth full.        “No thanks,” Miguel said. He was feeling homesick. He wandered around the room. The walls were covered with television screens of different shapes and sizes, like picture frames. Miguel watched as one picture changed from a dusty, red planet to a lush green one. Then a robot from the garage arrived.        “Excuse me, sir. You have a call in your pod. Your father wishes you to come home,” the robot said.              Miguel lost no time in finding Felipe. The two boys quickly said goodbye to their new friends. Then they raced down the hall and back to the garage. They jumped in the van, programmed the dial, and pulled the lever. In a few minutes they opened their eyes. They were in the old garage with Miguel’s dad waving and shouting, “It works! Tell me all about your trip!”   Which of the following events from “Time Van” occurred first in the story?
    • A. 

      Felipe pulls the lever in the van.

    • B. 

      The other children marvel at Filipe and Miguel.

    • C. 

      The garage changed.

    • D. 

      Miguel and Felipe see funny-looking people moving about

  • 4. 
    After Miguel and Felipe explored the scene, finding tall, skinny foods, fizzing drinks, and walls covered in television screens,
    • A. 

      Miguel’s dad said, “It works! Tell me all about your trip!”

    • B. 

      Miguel and Felipe followed the sounds of music and laughter.

    • C. 

      The robot tells Miguel that his father wishes him to return home.

    • D. 

      Miguel’s father is nowhere to be seen.

  • 5. 
                                                                                                      Time Van              Miguel’s father was a professor, an inventor, and a little strange. He spent most of his free time in the garage tinkering with an old van. Whenever Miguel’s friends came over, they wanted to peek in the garage. Exciting things always seemed to be happening—funny smells, strange sounds, and sometimes even explosions. One day when Felipe was visiting, he and Miguel peered into the garage. Miguel’s father was nowhere to be seen. The old van was rusty and missing most of its wheels, but it looked inviting. “Let’s check it out,” said Felipe, walking toward the van. “I don’t know,” said Miguel. “We’ll be careful,” Felipe said, opening the driver’s door. The boys climbed in. Felipe noticed Miguel’s dad had made changes to the dashboard. There were all sorts of complicated levers and dials.  The biggest dial read “1.1.3000.”              “What does this do?” Felipe asked, pulling down the longest lever. The van began to shake. Then it started to spin. The boys closed their eyes. Soon the spinning stopped. Miguel opened one eye. The garage had changed. It was silver and shiny. There were funny-looking people moving about. One tapped on the window of the van. Miguel rolled it down.  “Excuse me, sir,” said an oddly metallic voice, “are you guests of the party?” Miguel stared blankly, too shocked to respond.  Felipe said quickly, “Yes, um…sorry we’re late.”   “No need to apologize. Just leave your space pod with us. We’ll park it,” the metal man responded. Miguel looked closely and realized the man was actually a robot! He looked at the levers and dials of the van once more.  “1.1.3000?” he muttered. “That’s a date! We’ve gone forward  in time. The van is a time machine!” “Cool!” Felipe said, getting out of the van. “And we landed at a New Year’s Eve party!” Miguel and Felipe followed the sounds of music and laughter. In a round pink room, they found people in strange, colorful clothing. Odd electronic music played. A boy in a shiny orange suit drew near. “Great costumes! What are you supposed to be, children from the past?” The boy called to a group of children across the room. “Hey! Come see their costumes. They look just like children on our history discs.” The children moved closer and marveled.        One girl said, “I’m PZ10. Who are you?”        “We’re Felipe and Miguel,” said Felipe.        “Right! That’s a good one! Names that go with your costumes!” The children all laughed. Robots entered the room with trays of food and drinks. The boys didn’t recognize anything on the trays. There were tall, skinny foods that looked like hard, green spaghetti. Some of the drinks fizzed. Others smoked. Miguel suddenly wasn’t hungry. Felipe dug right in.        “You should try those blue things. They’re great!” Felipe mumbled with his mouth full.        “No thanks,” Miguel said. He was feeling homesick. He wandered around the room. The walls were covered with television screens of different shapes and sizes, like picture frames. Miguel watched as one picture changed from a dusty, red planet to a lush green one. Then a robot from the garage arrived.        “Excuse me, sir. You have a call in your pod. Your father wishes you to come home,” the robot said.              Miguel lost no time in finding Felipe. The two boys quickly said goodbye to their new friends. Then they raced down the hall and back to the garage. They jumped in the van, programmed the dial, and pulled the lever. In a few minutes they opened their eyes. They were in the old garage with Miguel’s dad waving and shouting, “It works! Tell me all about your trip!”   Choose the event that happens in the middle of the story.
    • A. 

      The van began to shake.

    • B. 

      A funny-looking person tapped on the window of the van.

    • C. 

      Miguel and Felipe followed the sounds of music and laughter.

    • D. 

      The two boys jumped into the van, programmed the dial, and pulled the lever.

  • 6. 
    In “Time Van”, how did Miguel feel once Felipe and he arrived at the party?
    • A. 

      Excited

    • B. 

      Homesick

    • C. 

      Mad

    • D. 

      Upset

  • 7. 
    In “Time Van,” Miguel is
    • A. 

      Hesitant to check out the van.

    • B. 

      Excited to check out the van.

    • C. 

      Unwilling to check out the van.

    • D. 

      Mad when Felipe suggests checking out the van.

  • 8. 
                                                                                                          Time Van              Miguel’s father was a professor, an inventor, and a little strange. He spent most of his free time in the garage tinkering with an old van. Whenever Miguel’s friends came over, they wanted to peek in the garage. Exciting things always seemed to be happening—funny smells, strange sounds, and sometimes even explosions. One day when Felipe was visiting, he and Miguel peered into the garage. Miguel’s father was nowhere to be seen. The old van was rusty and missing most of its wheels, but it looked inviting. “Let’s check it out,” said Felipe, walking toward the van. “I don’t know,” said Miguel. “We’ll be careful,” Felipe said, opening the driver’s door. The boys climbed in. Felipe noticed Miguel’s dad had made changes to the dashboard. There were all sorts of complicated levers and dials.  The biggest dial read “1.1.3000.”              “What does this do?” Felipe asked, pulling down the longest lever. The van began to shake. Then it started to spin. The boys closed their eyes. Soon the spinning stopped. Miguel opened one eye. The garage had changed. It was silver and shiny. There were funny-looking people moving about. One tapped on the window of the van. Miguel rolled it down.  “Excuse me, sir,” said an oddly metallic voice, “are you guests of the party?” Miguel stared blankly, too shocked to respond.  Felipe said quickly, “Yes, um…sorry we’re late.”   “No need to apologize. Just leave your space pod with us. We’ll park it,” the metal man responded. Miguel looked closely and realized the man was actually a robot! He looked at the levers and dials of the van once more.  “1.1.3000?” he muttered. “That’s a date! We’ve gone forward  in time. The van is a time machine!” “Cool!” Felipe said, getting out of the van. “And we landed at a New Year’s Eve party!” Miguel and Felipe followed the sounds of music and laughter. In a round pink room, they found people in strange, colorful clothing. Odd electronic music played. A boy in a shiny orange suit drew near. “Great costumes! What are you supposed to be, children from the past?” The boy called to a group of children across the room. “Hey! Come see their costumes. They look just like children on our history discs.” The children moved closer and marveled.        One girl said, “I’m PZ10. Who are you?”        “We’re Felipe and Miguel,” said Felipe.        “Right! That’s a good one! Names that go with your costumes!” The children all laughed. Robots entered the room with trays of food and drinks. The boys didn’t recognize anything on the trays. There were tall, skinny foods that looked like hard, green spaghetti. Some of the drinks fizzed. Others smoked. Miguel suddenly wasn’t hungry. Felipe dug right in.        “You should try those blue things. They’re great!” Felipe mumbled with his mouth full.        “No thanks,” Miguel said. He was feeling homesick. He wandered around the room. The walls were covered with television screens of different shapes and sizes, like picture frames. Miguel watched as one picture changed from a dusty, red planet to a lush green one. Then a robot from the garage arrived.        “Excuse me, sir. You have a call in your pod. Your father wishes you to come home,” the robot said.              Miguel lost no time in finding Felipe. The two boys quickly said goodbye to their new friends. Then they raced down the hall and back to the garage. They jumped in the van, programmed the dial, and pulled the lever. In a few minutes they opened their eyes. They were in the old garage with Miguel’s dad waving and shouting, “It works! Tell me all about your trip!”   What happens after the passage below? “What does this do?” Felipe asked, pulling down the longest lever. The van began to shake. Then it started to spin. The boys closed their eyes.
    • A. 

      Felipe jumps out of the van and runs home.

    • B. 

      Miguel’s father runs into the garage and orders the boys to leave.

    • C. 

      Miguel and Felipe travel into the future.

    • D. 

      Miguel and Felipe arrive at a New Year ‘s Eve party in the year 3000.

  • 9. 
    At the end of the passage, Miguel’s father is
    • A. 

      Upset with the boys.

    • B. 

      Excited the time van works.

    • C. 

      Calling Felipe’s father so that he will punished.

    • D. 

      Worried about the boys’ trip.

  • 10. 
    What might have happened in the story if Felipe never visited Miguel?
    • A. 

      Miguel would not have a relationship with his dad.

    • B. 

      Miguel’s father would not have known that his time van works.

    • C. 

      Miguel and his father would travel in the van together.

    • D. 

      Felipe and Miguel would remain friends.

  • 11. 
    What is the best clue from the party dialogue in “Time Van” that suggests Felipe is a more adventurous character than Miguel?
    • A. 

      “Cool!” Felipe said getting out of the van.

    • B. 

      “Yes, um...sorry we’re late.”

    • C. 

      “We’re Felipe and Miguel” said Felipe

    • D. 

      “You should try those blue things. They’re great!” Felipe mumbled with his mouth full.

  • 12. 
    The statement “Right! That’s a good one! Names that go with your costumes!” suggests that the children in the future
    • A. 

      Consider Felipe and Miguel good at choosing costumes

    • B. 

      Believe Felipe and Miguel are from the past

    • C. 

      No longer have personal names but are identified by a code

    • D. 

      Want Felipe and Miguel to enjoy themselves

  • 13. 
                                                                   The Bell of Atri                                                       Retold by James Baldwin        Atri is the name of a little town in Italy. It is a very old town and is built halfway up the side of a steep hill.             A long time ago, the King of Atri bought a fine large bell and had it hung up in a tower in the marketplace. A long rope that reached almost to the ground was fastened to the bell. The smallest child could ring the bell by pulling upon this rope.            “It is the bell of justice,” said the King.            When at last everything was ready, the people of Atri had a great holiday. All the men and women and children came down to the marketplace to look at the bell of justice. It was a very pretty bell and was polished until it looked almost as bright and yellow as the sun.            “How we should like to hear it ring!” they said. Then the King came down the street. “Perhaps he will ring it,” said the people. And everybody stood very still and waited to see what he would do.            But he did not ring the bell. He did not even take the rope in his hands. When he came to the foot of the tower, he stopped, and raised his hand.             “My people,” he said, “do you see this beautiful bell? It is your bell. But it must never be rung except in case of need. If any one of you is wronged at any time, you may come and ring the bell. And then the judges shall come together at once, and hear your case, and give you justice. Rich and poor, old and young, all alike may come. But no one must touch the rope unless you know that you have been wronged.”            Many years passed by after this. Many times did the bell in the marketplace ring out to call the judges together. Many wrongs were righted, many ill-doers were punished. At last the rope was almost worn out. The lower part of it was untwisted; some of the strands were broken; it became so short that only someone tall could reach it.            “This will never do,” said the judges one day. “What if a child should be wronged? The child could not ring the bell to let us know it.”            They gave orders that a new rope should be put upon the bell at once—a rope that should hang down to the ground so that the smallest child could reach it. But there was not a rope to be found in all Atri. They would have to send across the mountains for one, and it would be many days before it could be brought. What if some great wrong should be done before it came? How could the judges know about it, if the injured one could not reach the old rope?            “Let me fix it for you,” said a man who stood by.            He ran into his garden, which was not far away, and soon came back with a long grapevine in his hands.            “This will do for a rope,” he said.            And he climbed up and fastened it to the bell. The slender vine, with its leaves and tendrils still upon it, trailed to the ground.            “Yes,” said the judges, “it is a very good rope. Let it be as it is.”            Now, on the hillside above the village, there lived a man who had once been a brave knight. In his youth he had ridden through many lands, and he had fought in many a battle. His best friend through all that time had been his horse—a strong, noble steed that had borne him safe through many a danger.            But the knight, when he grew older, cared no more to ride into battle; he cared no more to do brave deeds; he thought of nothing but gold; he became a miser.  At last he sold all that he had, except his horse, and went to live in a little hut on the hillside. Day after day he sat among his moneybags and planned how he might get more gold. And day after day his horse stood in his bare stall, hungry and shivering with cold.            “What is the use of keeping that lazy steed?” said the miser to himself one morning. “Every week it costs me more to keep him than he is worth. I might sell him, but there is no one who wants him. I cannot even give him away. I will turn him out to shift for himself and pick grass by the roadside.”            So the brave old horse was turned out to find what he could among the rocks on the barren hillside. Lame and sick, he strolled along the dusty roads, glad to find a blade of grass or a thistle. The dogs barked at him, and in all the world there was no one to pity him.            One hot afternoon, when no one was upon the street, the horse chanced to wander into the marketplace. Not a man nor child was there, for the heat of the sun had driven them all indoors. The gates were wide open; the poor beast could roam where he pleased. He saw the grapevine rope that hung from the bell of justice. The leaves and tendrils upon it were still fresh and green, for it had not been there long. What a fine dinner they would be for a hungry horse!            He stretched his thin neck and took one of the tempting morsels in his mouth. It was hard to break it from the vine. He pulled at it, and the great bell above him began to ring. All the people in Atri heard it. It seemed to say, Someone has done me wrong!  Someone has done me wrong! Oh, come and judge my case! Oh, come and judge my case! For I’ve been wronged!      The judges heard it. They put on their robes and went out through the hot streets to the marketplace. They wondered who it could be who would ring the bell at such a time. When they passed through the gate, they saw the old horse nibbling at the vine.            “Ha!” cried one, “It is the miser’s steed. He has come to call for justice. For his master, as everybody knows, has treated him most shamefully.”        “He pleads his cause as well as any animal can,” said another.            “And he shall have justice!” said the third.            Meanwhile a crowd of men and women and children had come into the marketplace, eager to learn what case the judges were about to try. When they saw the horse, all stood still in wonder. Then everyone was ready to tell how they had seen him wandering on the hills, unfed, uncared for, while his master sat at home counting his bags of gold.            “Go bring the miser before us,” said the judges.            And when he came, they bade him stand and hear their judgment.            “This horse has served you well for many a year,” they said. “He has saved you from many a peril. He has helped you gain your wealth. Therefore we order that one half of all your gold shall be set aside to buy him shelter and food, a green pasture where he may graze, and a warm stall to comfort him in his old age.”            The miser hung his head and grieved to lose his gold. But the people shouted with joy, and the horse was led away to his new stall and a dinner such as he had not had in many a day. Adaptation of “The Bell of Atri” retold by James Baldwin from The Book of Virtues for Young People, William J. Bennett, editor, copyright _ 1996 by William J. Bennett. Q:When does this story most likely take place?
    • A. 

      The recent past

    • B. 

      The distant past

    • C. 

      The present

    • D. 

      Prehistoric times

  • 14. 
    The mood of this story can best be described as ____
    • A. 

      Nostalgic.

    • B. 

      Dramatic.

    • C. 

      Serious.

    • D. 

      Reflective.

  • 15. 
    The miser's actions towards the horse shows he is  ______
    • A. 

      Selfish.

    • B. 

      Brave.

    • C. 

      Generous.

    • D. 

      Regretful.

  • 16. 
    Placing the bell in the marketplace in Atri is part of the _____ of this story.
    • A. 

      Exposition

    • B. 

      Climax

    • C. 

      Conflict

    • D. 

      Conflict (yes, I realize this is on here twice. This test came from the Board and I am giving it EXACTLY like theysent it to me)

  • 17. 
    The main conflict of the story is ____
    • A. 

      Man against man.

    • B. 

      Man against nature.

    • C. 

      Man against God.

    • D. 

      Man against himself.

  • 18. 
    The theme of the story is primarily about _____
    • A. 

      The triumph of justice over injustice.

    • B. 

      The triumph of injustice over justice.

    • C. 

      An old miser's repentance of his evil ways.

    • D. 

      A town's system for calling judges to judge wrongdoings.

  • 19. 
    The horse is finally rewarded with fine food and a stall in the part of the story known as the _____
    • A. 

      Plot.

    • B. 

      Exposition.

    • C. 

      Climax.

    • D. 

      Denoument.

  • 20. 
    The climax of the story occurs ____
    • A. 

      When the rope is replaced with a grapevine.

    • B. 

      When the horse causes the bell to ring.

    • C. 

      When the judgement is made against the miser.

    • D. 

      When the horse is given a new stall and dinner.

  • 21. 
    All of the action that takes place  in the story is part of the ____
    • A. 

      Exposition.

    • B. 

      Rising action.

    • C. 

      Plot.

    • D. 

      Denoument.

  • 22. 
    The King of Atri can best be characterized as ___
    • A. 

      Just.

    • B. 

      Miserly.

    • C. 

      Loving.

    • D. 

      Vengeful.

  • 23. 
                The Children’s Hour by  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow   Between the dark and the daylight, When the night is beginning to lower, Comes a pause in the day's occupations, That is known as the Children's Hour.   I hear in the chamber above me The patter of little feet, The sound of a door that is opened, And voices soft and sweet.   From my study I see in the lamplight, Descending the broad hall stair, Grave Alice, and laughing Allegra, And Edith with golden hair.   A whisper, and then a silence: Yet I know by their merry eyes They are plotting and planning together To take me by surprise.   A sudden rush from the stairway, A sudden raid from the hall! By three doors left unguarded They enter my castle wall!   They climb up into my turret O'er the arms and back of my chair; If I try to escape, they surround me; They seem to be everywhere.   They almost devour me with kisses, Their arms about me entwine, Till I think of the Bishop of Bingen In his Mouse-Tower on the Rhine!   Do you think, o blue-eyed banditti, Because you have scaled the wall, Such an old mustache as I am Is not a match for you all!   I have you fast in my fortress, And will not let you depart, But put you down into the dungeon In the round-tower of my heart.   And there will I keep you forever, Yes, forever and a day, Till the walls shall crumble to ruin, And moulder in dust away!   Q: What time of day does this poem take place?
    • A. 

      Evening

    • B. 

      Dawn

    • C. 

      Midnight

    • D. 

      Afternoon

  • 24. 
    The word that best describes the mood of the poem is _____
    • A. 

      Serious.

    • B. 

      Mysterious.

    • C. 

      Peaceful.

    • D. 

      Dramatic.

  • 25. 
    The narrator’s response to the children’s attack shows that he is ____
    • A. 

      Frustrated.

    • B. 

      Nervous.

    • C. 

      Annoyed.

    • D. 

      Playful.

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