Figurative Language And Poetry Quiz

29 Questions | Total Attempts: 285

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Figurative Language Quizzes & Trivia

We have been studying Figurative Language in Poetry. Based on the news terms you have learned and the Do Now readings we have completed in class, this quiz has beend designed to evaluate your processing skills. Answer the multpile choice questions, providing the best response. There is onlew one answer per question.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    She is like the wind.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 2. 
    He is a monster when he doesn't get his way.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Idiom

  • 3. 
    Who let the cat out of the bag?
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Idiom

  • 4. 
    The ocean waves carried the girl back to shore.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Idiom

  • 5. 
    Your skating on thin ice mister.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Idiom

  • 6. 
    They were a nightmare to work with yesterday!
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Alliteration

  • 7. 
    The sun smiled down on us.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Idiom

  • 8. 
    Sweet sugar seasoned the cookies.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Alliteration

  • 9. 
    She was a graceful as a swan during the ballet recital.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • D. 

      Personification

  • 10. 
    The scream of the siren woke him up.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Idiom

  • 11. 
    The frog waltzed over to the lily pad.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Idiom

  • 12. 
    Her eyes were the center of the storm.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Idiom

    • D. 

      Alliteration

  • 13. 
    You can't teach an old dog new tricks.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Idiom

    • D. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 14. 
    The basketball swooshed into the basket and the crowd roared.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Idiom

    • D. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 15. 
    My backpack is as heavy as lead.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Idiom

    • D. 

      Alliteration

  • 16. 
    Pop! The car rattled down the road with a flat tire.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • D. 

      Idiom

  • 17. 
    The icecream is heaven.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Alliteration

    • D. 

      Personification

  • 18. 
    The color yellow is a friendship rose.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Alliteration

  • 19. 
    Tired and true may love transcend time.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Alliteration

    • D. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 20. 
    It cost her an arm and a leg to buy those shoes.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • D. 

      Idiom

  • 21. 
    In poetry, a group of lines placed together is called a what?
    • A. 

      Line

    • B. 

      Stanza

    • C. 

      Row

    • D. 

      Paragraph

  • 22. 
    The pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables is called what?
    • A. 

      Rhyme

    • B. 

      Meter

    • C. 

      Pattern

    • D. 

      Song

  • 23. 
    Choose to chance the rapids and dare to dance the tide is an example of:
    • A. 

      Personification and end rhyme

    • B. 

      Alliteration and end rhyme

    • C. 

      Personification and internal rhyme

    • D. 

      Alliteration and internal rhyme

  • 24. 
    The speaker of a poem is:
    • A. 

      The poet

    • B. 

      The author

    • C. 

      The narrator

    • D. 

      The Writer

  • 25. 
    What is the rhyme scheme of the following poem? My dog eats candy Her name is Sandy She likes to eat my pants and occasionally eats ants she drives my family crazy as she seldom is lazy running here and running there Sandy's going everywhere!!
    • A. 

      Aabbccdd

    • B. 

      Abcdabcd

    • C. 

      Bcadcabd

    • D. 

      Adbcadcb

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