Ex. 12 - Stalls

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 193

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Aircraft Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What is a stall in an airplane?
    • A. 

      Flight beyond the critical angle of attack; i.e., the angle of attack beyond which increasing the angle of attack will decrease, not increase, lift

    • B. 

      Flight below the critical airspeed; i.e., the airspeed given in the POH below which the wing will no longer produce lift

    • C. 

      A condition in which the plane's engine has stopped because the propeller blades exceeded the critical angle of attack

    • D. 

      A sudden nose drop and a rapid descent at high airspeed, caused by excessive nose-up attitude of the airplane

  • 2. 
    What is washout, and what's the purpose of building it into the plane's design?
    • A. 

      It is a tapering of the wing towards the trailing edge to ensure smooth airflow

    • B. 

      It is a built-in increase in the angle of incidence as you go towards the wingtips to ensure they stall first while the rest of the wing is still flying normally

    • C. 

      It is the a shallow bowl-shaped dip at the top of each wing, to "trap" turbulent air and delay a stall

    • D. 

      It is the difference in the angle of incidence between the wing root and the wing tip, used to increase aileron effectiveness in stalls

  • 3. 
    How does power affect a plane's stalling characteristics?
    • A. 

      A power-on stall will be "gentler" than a power-off stall, but it is dangerous because the engine noise may make it difficult to hear the stall horn

    • B. 

      A power-on stall will occur at a higher airspeed than a power-off stall, but will be less dramatic and easier to recover from

    • C. 

      A power-on stall will occur at a lower airspeed than a power-off stall, but will be more "aggressive" and is more likely to result in a wing drop

    • D. 

      Power has no noticeable difference on stall characteristics

  • 4. 
    During a power-on stall practice, your right wing drops as the plane stalls. Which of the following actions would you immediately take to help remedy the situation? (Check ALL that apply.)
    • A. 

      Apply left rudder

    • B. 

      Turn yoke to the left

    • C. 

      Pull the yoke all the way back to increase control effectiveness

  • 5. 
    What accounts for buffeting (airframe shaking) you may experience as you approach a stall?
    • A. 

      Engine roughness due to overheating because of insufficient cooling at high angles of attack

    • B. 

      Aileron flutter

    • C. 

      Turbulent airflow over the wings due to an increase in the angle of attack

    • D. 

      Elevator oscillations due to insufficient air flow

  • 6. 
    True or false: to break a stall, you must reduce the plane's angle of attack by reducing back pressure (or pushing forward) on the yoke?
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 7. 
    On a recovery from a typical power-off stall, how far do you push the nose down?
    • A. 

      As far down as it can go, to build up the airspeed faster

    • B. 

      Well below the horizon, to build up the airspeed faster

    • C. 

      Just sufficiently to unstall the wing (typically close to cruise attitude)

    • D. 

      Barely a degree or two

  • 8. 
    Ok, so as you recover from a stall, you put the nose down just enough to unstall the wings. What can you do next to prevent further altitude loss?
    • A. 

      Immediately pull nose up

    • B. 

      Add power (and turn carb heat off, if your plane has it!)

    • C. 

      Lower flaps

    • D. 

      Maintain best glide speed

  • 9. 
    We say that a plane always stalls at the same angle of attack (and in case of a straight unaccelerated flight this means the same airspeed). However, the wing's aerodynamics will vary based on the number of conditions, which affect the critical angle of attack and the stall speed. Which of the following factors INCREASE the stall speed? (Check ALL that apply.)
    • A. 

      Forward centre of gravity

    • B. 

      Aft centre of gravity

    • C. 

      Higher weight

    • D. 

      Lower weight

    • E. 

      Steep bank angles

    • F. 

      Power

    • G. 

      Flaps

  • 10. 
    Assuming your plane is equipped with a properly functioning stall warning horn, in which cases will it likely fail to sound before the stall? (Check ALL that apply.)
    • A. 

      In steep turns, because the plane will stall at much higher airspeed than normal

    • B. 

      In severe icing conditions, because the plane will stall at a much higher angle of attack than normal

    • C. 

      In any stalling situation which occurs above published stall speeds (turns, high-G manoeuvres etc.)

    • D. 

      A properly functioning stall warning horn will always sound just before a stall since it detects the increase in airflow turbulence over the wing which occurs before every stall

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